Nav: Home

Current Acoustics News and Events

Current Acoustics News and Events, Acoustics News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 12 | 463 Results
Photonic amorphous topological insulator
The current understanding of topological insulators and their classical wave analogues, such as photonic topological insulators, is mainly based on topological band theory. (2020-07-27)
Topological photonics in fractal lattices
Photonic topological insulators are currently a subject of great interest because of the features: insulating bulk and topological edge states. (2020-07-21)
Physicists find ways to control gamma radiation
Researchers from Kazan Federal University, Texas A&M University and Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Academy of Sciences) found ways to direct high frequency gamma radiation by means of acoustics. (2020-07-21)
Animals who try to sound 'bigger' are good at learning sounds
Some animals fake their body size by sounding 'bigger' than they actually are. (2020-07-08)
The human brain tracks speech more closely in time than other sounds
The way that speech processing differs from the processing of other sounds has long been a major open question in human neuroscience. (2020-06-22)
Acoustics put a fresh spin on electron transitions
Electrons are very much at the mercy of magnetic fields, which scientists can manipulate to control the electrons and their angular momentum -- i.e. their 'spin.' (2020-06-10)
'Whispering gallery' effect controls electron beams with light
When you speak softly in one of the galleries of St Paul's cathedral, the sound runs around the dome and visitors anywhere on its circumference can hear it. (2020-06-05)
SUTD scientists led development of novel acoustofluidic technology that isolates submicron particles
SUTD researchers and their collaborators developed a novel nanoacoustic trapping device that manipulates particles within submicron ranges by applying a structured elastic layer at the interface between a microfluidic channel and a travelling surface acoustic wave (SAW). (2020-05-19)
Two-face god in sound: Directionality beyond spin-directed acoustics
Understanding unidirectional and topological wave phenomena requires the unveiling of intrinsic geometry and symmetry for wave dynamics. (2020-05-12)
Tuning into dolphin chatter could boost conservation efforts
Researchers from Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Australia and Curtin University have moved an important step closer to using sound rather than sight to track individual dolphin activity. (2020-04-29)
Additions to resource industry underwater robots can boost ocean discoveries
Underwater robots are regularly used by the oil and gas industry to inspect and maintain offshore structures. (2020-04-15)
New research sheds light on the unique 'call' of Ross Sea killer whales
New Curtin University-led research has found that the smallest type of killer whale has 28 different complex calls, comprising a combination of burst-pulse sounds and whistles, which they use to communicate with family members about the changing landscape and habitat. (2020-02-26)
APS tip sheet: Listening to bursting bubbles
Sound signatures from violent fluid events, like bubbles bursting, can be used to measure forces at work during these events. (2020-02-24)
Deep learning can fool listeners by imitating any guitar amplifier
A study from the Aalto Acoustics Lab demonstrates that digital simulations of guitar amplifiers can sound just like the real thing. (2020-02-11)
Acoustic focusing to amass microplastics in water
Microplastics suspended in water can be gathered using acoustic forces in microchannels. (2019-12-09)
Fish scattering sound waves has impact on aquaculture
Fisheries acoustics have been studied for over 40 years to assess biomass and optimize aquaculture applications, and researchers in France have examined the phenomenon of how fish scatter acoustic waves in a dense school of fish contained in an open-sea cage. (2019-12-06)
Stormquakes: Powerful storms cause seafloor tremors
Stormquakes are a phenomenon characterized by seismic activity originating at the ocean floor due to powerful storms. (2019-12-06)
Move over Jules Verne -- scientists deploy ocean floats to peer into Earth's interior
The release of more than 50 floating sensors, called Mobile Earthquake Recording in Marine Areas by Independent Divers (MERMAIDs), is increasing the number of seismic stations around the planet. (2019-12-06)
Finding meaning in 'Rick and Morty,' one burp at a time
One of the first things viewers of 'Rick and Morty' might notice about Rick is his penchant for punctuating his speech with burps. (2019-12-05)
Bats may benefit from wildfire
Bats face many threats -- from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome. (2019-12-05)
Can 3D-printing musical instruments produce better sound than traditional instruments?
Music is an art, but it is also a science involving vibrating reeds and strings, sound waves and resonances. (2019-12-05)
Atom music lets listeners experience atomic world through sound
Atoms absorb and release energy in the form of photons that we perceive as different colors, which can be passed through a prism that reveals the atom's spectrum as colored lines. (2019-12-04)
National Park Service scientists: Does aircraft noise make birds more vocal?
National Park Service scientists analyzed nearly 1 million 10-second audio recording samples from national parks across the country and discovered a small increase in bird sound detection when an aircraft sound is also detected. (2019-12-04)
Characterizing whale vocalization can help map migration
Killer whale pods each have their own set of calls they use to communicate, sometimes referred to as the pod's 'dialect.' By characterizing a pod's calls, researchers can track its seasonal movements, gaining a better understanding of the whales' lives. (2019-12-03)
Ultrasound techniques give warning signs of preterm births
Ultrasound can be used to examine cervix tissue and improve diagnostics, which is essential for predicting preterm births, and ultrasound data is used to compare two techniques for evaluating changes in cervical tissue throughout pregnancy. (2019-12-03)
Improving drug delivery for brain tumor treatment
Despite improvements in drug delivery mechanisms, treating brain tumors has remained challenging. (2019-12-02)
Whales stop being socialites when boats are about
The noise and presence of boats can harm humpback whales' ability to communicate and socialise, in some cases reducing their communication range by a factor of four. (2019-11-28)
Super light dampers for low tones
A team of Empa acoustic researchers has built macroscopic crystal structures that use internal ro-tation to attenuate the propagation of waves. (2019-10-15)
Light and sound in silicon chips: The slower the better
Acoustics is a missing dimension in silicon chips because acoustics can complete specific tasks that are difficult to do with electronics and optics alone. (2019-09-16)
Underwater soundscapes reveal differences in marine environments
Storms, boat traffic, animal noises and more contribute to the underwater sound environment in the ocean, even in areas considered protected. (2019-09-04)
Ultrasound: The potential power for cardiovascular disease therapy
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. (2019-08-15)
Researchers create first-ever personalised sound projector with £10 webcam
A University of Sussex research team have demonstrated the first sound projector that can track a moving individual and deliver an acoustic message as they move, to a high-profile tech and media conference in LA. (2019-08-05)
Strong storms also play big role in Antarctic ice shelf collapse
Warming temperatures and changes in ocean circulation and salinity are driving the breakup of ice sheets in Antarctica, but a new study suggests that intense storms may help push the system over the edge. (2019-07-18)
Mastering a prickly problem in ferrofluids
Computer simulation accurately captures the beguiling motion of a liquid magnetic material. (2019-07-15)
Auroral crackling sounds are related to the electromagnetic resonances of the Earth
A new study shows that the sounds generated at an altitude of 70 to 80 metres are the result of the activation of Schumann resonances. (2019-07-10)
Storing data in music
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a technique for embedding data in music and transmitting it to a smartphone. (2019-07-09)
The discovery of acoustic spin
Recently, Chengzhi Shi (now at Georgia Tech), Rongkuo Zhao, Sui Yang, Yuan Wang, and Xiang Zhang from the University of California, Berkeley and Long Yang, Hong Chen, and Jie Ren from Tongji University discover and experimentally observe the existence of acoustic spin in airborne sound waves. (2019-05-28)
Restaurant acoustics that schmeckt
Acoustics consultant Klaus Genuit says that new ISO guidelines for defining, measuring and evaluating soundscapes are a big step forward in guiding the creation of audibly fine restaurants. (2019-05-17)
New whistle alerts bats to steer clear of wind turbines
Wind turbines are a critical component in the strategy for energy independence, but these massive structures are also killing bats. (2019-05-15)
Scientists suss out the secrets of human screams
Screaming is well-studied in animals, but much less is known about how human screams function in communication, or how similar or different human screams are from those of other species. (2019-05-15)
Page 1 of 12 | 463 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Our Relationship With Water
We need water to live. But with rising seas and so many lacking clean water – water is in crisis and so are we. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around restoring our relationship with water. Guests on the show include legal scholar Kelsey Leonard, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier, and community organizer Colette Pichon Battle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#568 Poker Face Psychology
Anyone who's seen pop culture depictions of poker might think statistics and math is the only way to get ahead. But no, there's psychology too. Author Maria Konnikova took her Ph.D. in psychology to the poker table, and turned out to be good. So good, she went pro in poker, and learned all about her own biases on the way. We're talking about her new book "The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.