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Could your computer please be more polite? Thank you
In a tense time when a pandemic rages, politicians wrangle for votes and protesters demand racial justice, a little politeness and courtesy go a long way. (2020-06-30)
The "eyes" say more than the "mouth" and can distinguish English sounds
Toyohashi University of Technology has discovered that the difference in the ability to hear and distinguish English words including L and R, which are considered difficult for Japanese people, appears in pupillary responses. (2020-06-30)
NIH study finds out why some words may be more memorable than others
In a recent study of epilepsy patients and healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers found that our brains may withdraw some common words, like ''pig,'' ''tank,'' and ''door,'' much more often than others, including ''cat,'' ''street,'' and ''stair.'' By combining memory tests, brain wave recordings, and surveys of billions of words published in books, news articles and internet encyclopedia pages, the researchers not only showed how our brains may recall words but also memories of our past experiences. (2020-06-29)
Wearable-tech glove translates sign language into speech in real time
UCLA bioengineers have designed a glove-like device that can translate American Sign Language into English speech in real time though a smartphone app. (2020-06-29)
Polarized tweets reveal deep divisions in congressional COVID-19 messaging
An analysis of COVID-19-related tweets issued by members of Congress from January 17 through March 31, 2020 finds that Democrats and Republicans quickly polarized along party lines in their messaging about the virus on Twitter. (2020-06-24)
Machine learning has a flaw; it's gullible
Research forthcoming in Strategic Management Journal explores potential biases that limit the effectiveness of ML process technologies and the scope for human capital to be complementary in reducing such biases. (2020-06-23)
The human brain tracks speech more closely in time than other sounds
The way that speech processing differs from the processing of other sounds has long been a major open question in human neuroscience. (2020-06-22)
JHU: A man who can't see numbers provides new insight into awareness
By studying an individual with an extremely rare brain anomaly that prevents him from seeing certain numbers, Johns Hopkins University researchers provided new evidence that a robust brain response to something like a face or a word does not mean a person is aware of it. (2020-06-22)
AI reduces 'communication gap' for nonverbal people by as much as half
Researchers have used artificial intelligence to reduce the 'communication gap' for nonverbal people with motor disabilities who rely on computers to converse with others. (2020-06-15)
The brain uses minimum effort to look for key information in text
The human brain avoids taking unnecessary effort. When a person is reading, she strives to gain as much information as possible by dedicating as little of her cognitive capacity as possible to the processing. (2020-06-11)
People make irrational trust decisions precisely
Online health information is deemed doubly less trustworthy if the text includes both ''shouting'' and spelling errors together, according to a new study at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS). (2020-06-10)
Infants have a basic knowledge of the role and limitations of language
Marc Colomer and Núria Sebastián Gallés, members of the Speech Acquisition and Perception (SAP) research group of the Center for Brain and Cognition (CBC) at UPF have investigated whether 14 month-old infants understand that language is a communication tool for transmitting information between speakers of the same language. (2020-06-08)
Forgot where you parked the car? Research suggests memory is a game of all or nothing
An online study, involving more than 400 participants aged 18-35, reveals that memories for specific locations are either totally forgotten or, if they are remembered, it's with as much precision as when they were first learnt. (2020-06-08)
Your brain needs to be ready to remember?
What happens in the hippocampus even before people attempt to form memories may impact whether they remember. (2020-06-01)
Exploring the use of 'stretchable' words in social media
An investigation of Twitter messages reveals new insights and tools for studying how people use stretched words, such as 'duuuuude,' 'heyyyyy,' or 'noooooooo.' Tyler Gray and colleagues at the University of Vermont in Burlington present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 27, 2020. (2020-05-27)
Arts-based method to detect school bullying
Co-authors Daria Hanolainen and Elena Semenova created and tested an experimental method of graphical vignettes - a set of incomplete comic strips which kids are asked to complete using their own creative vision. (2020-05-18)
Oink, oink makes the pig
In a new study, neuroscientists at TU Dresden demonstrated that the use of gestures and pictures makes foreign language teaching in primary schools more effective and sustainable. (2020-05-13)
The feeling a limb doesn't belong is linked to lack of brain structure and connection
People with body integrity dysphoria (BID) often feel as though one of their healthy limbs isn't meant to be a part of their bodies. (2020-05-07)
Similar brain glitch found in slips of signing, speaking
The discovery of a common neural mechanism in speech and ASL errors -- one that occurs in just 40 milliseconds -- could improve recovery in deaf signers after a stroke. (2020-05-04)
How the heart affects our perception
When we encounter a dangerous situation, signals from the brain make sure that the heart beats faster. (2020-04-28)
Eye contact activates the autonomic nervous system even during video calls
A new study from Tampere University in Finland found that eye contact during video calls can elicit similar psychophysiological responses than those in genuine, in-person eye contact. (2020-04-23)
Views on guns and death penalty are linked to harsh treatment of immigrants
An online study that pulled equally from people who identify as Democrats or Republicans has found subtle new clues that underlie the dehumanization of immigrants. (2020-04-22)
Scientists uncover principles of universal self-assembly
Self-assembly is the process that built up life and its surrounding, atom-by-atom. (2020-04-20)
The lipid code
So far, it has been difficult to analyze the functions of lipid molecules in living cells. (2020-04-17)
Blocking the iron transport could stop tuberculosis
The bacteria that cause tuberculosis need iron to survive. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now solved the first detailed structure of the transport protein responsible for the iron supply. (2020-04-01)
Some mobile phone apps may contain hidden behaviors that users never see
A team of cybersecurity researchers has discovered that a large number of cell phone applications contain hardcoded secrets allowing others to access private data or block content provided by users. (2020-03-31)
We're getting better at wildlife conservation, AI study of scientific abstracts suggests
Researchers are using a kind of machine learning known as sentiment analysis to assess the successes and failures of wildlife conservation over time. (2020-03-19)
At 8 months, babies already know their grammar
Even before uttering their first words, babies master the grammar basics of their mother tongue. (2020-03-12)
Environmental DNA in rivers offers new tool for detecting wildlife communities
Ecologists in England and Scotland, collaborating with ecologists Christopher Sutherland and Joseph Drake at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, report this week on a new method of identifying an 'entire community of mammals' -- including elusive and endangered species that are otherwise difficult to monitor -- by collecting DNA from river water. (2020-03-12)
Neuroscientists discover new structure of important protein in the brain
A novel structure of a so-called 'neurotransmitter: sodium symporter' has been mapped at the University of Copenhagen. (2020-03-06)
New sleep method strengthens brain's ability to retain memories
A new joint study by Tel Aviv University and Weizmann Institute of Science researchers has yielded an innovative method for bolstering memory processes in the brain during sleep. (2020-03-05)
How computational linguistics helps to understand how language works
Distributional semantics obtains representations of the meaning of words by processing thousands of texts and extracting generalizations using computational algorithms. (2020-03-03)
Predicting intentional accounting misreporting
Taking a fine-tooth comb over the words in a firm's annual report, instead of the numbers, could better predict intentional misreporting, says SMU Assistant Professor Richard Crowley. (2020-03-01)
Bilingual mash ups: Counterintuitive findings from sociolinguistics
A new study exposes the fallacy of relying on pronunciation as a measure of linguistic proficiency. (2020-02-26)
Why Edgar Allan Poe probably did not kill himself
A computational analysis of language used by the writer Edgar Allan Poe has revealed that his mysterious death was unlikely to have been suicide. (2020-02-24)
The strategy of cells to deal with the accumulation of misfolded proteins is identified
In the paper, published in the journal Cell Reports, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe yeast model has been used to investigate the protein quality control process. (2020-02-21)
Mediterranean rainfall immediately affected by greenhouse gas changes
Mediterranean-type climates face immediate drops in rainfall when greenhouse gases rise, but this could be interrupted quickly if emissions are cut. (2020-02-17)
Scientists pinpoint brain coordinates for face blindness
Danish and Norwegian researchers have moved one step closer to understanding where face blindness stems from in the brain. (2020-02-17)
Words matter when it comes to apparel for people living with disabilitie
Brands should consider the language they use when marketing products to this group of consumers, according to a new study from the University of Missouri. (2020-02-06)
Praise, rather than punish, to see up to 30% greater focus in the classroom
To improve behavior in class, teachers should focus on praising children for good behavior, rather than telling them off for being disruptive, according to a new study published in Educational Psychology. (2020-01-29)
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