Nav: Home

Current Adverse drug reactions News and Events

Current Adverse drug reactions News and Events, Adverse drug reactions News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Helping the body's ability to grow bone
For the first time, scientists have been able to study how well synthetic bone grafts stand up to the rigors and 'strains' of life, and how quickly they help bone re-grow and repair. (2019-06-24)
Can deprescribing drugs linked to cognitive impairment actually reduce risk of dementia?
A JAMA Internal Medicine commentary by three Regenstrief Institute research scientists calls for randomized deprescribing trials to address anticholinergic drug use as a potentially modifiable and reversible risk factor for dementia, a growing public health issue. (2019-06-24)
Novel noninvasive molecular imaging for monitoring rheumatoid arthritis
A first-in-human Phase 1/Phase II study demonstrates that intravenous administration of the radiopharmaceutical imaging agent technetium-99m (99mTc) tilmanocept promises to be a safe, well-tolerated, noninvasive means of monitoring rheumatoid arthritis disease activity. (2019-06-23)
Using graphene and tiny droplets to detect stomach-cancer causing bacteria
A Japan-based research team led by Osaka University used graphene and microfluidics to identify stomach-cancer causing bacteria by detecting chemical reactions of the bacteria at the surface of the biosensor. (2019-06-20)
Why does the moon smell like gunpowder? (video)
After walking on the Moon astronauts hopped back into their lunar lander, bringing Moon dust with them. (2019-06-20)
Vitamin D supplementation not associated with reduced cardiovascular events
This study, called a meta-analysis, combined the results of 21 randomized clinical trials with about 83,000 patients to look at whether vitamin D supplementation was associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease events such as heart attack or stroke. (2019-06-19)
Vitamin D may not help your heart
While previous research has suggested a link between low levels of vitamin D in the blood and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a new Michigan State University study has found that taking vitamin D supplements did not reduce that risk. (2019-06-19)
Reconfigurable multi-organ-on-a-chip system reliably evaluates chemotherapy toxicity
Christopher McAleer and colleagues have created a new multiorgan-on-a-chip system that can accurately capture the toxic effects of chemotherapies that have been metabolized by the liver -- effects usually not seen in standard cell culture preclinical drug development. (2019-06-19)
Drug boosts growth in youngsters with most common form of dwarfism, new study finds
A drug that helps regulate bone development has boosted growth rates in children with achondroplasia -- the most common type of dwarfism -- in a trial by Melbourne's Murdoch Children's Research Institute. (2019-06-18)
Harvard chemists' breakthrough in synthesis advances a potent anti-cancer agent
Chemists at Harvard University and Eisai have achieved what a new paper calls a 'landmark in drug discovery' with the total synthesis of 11.5g of halichondrin. (2019-06-17)
Cardiac toxicity risk factors identified with relapsed multiple myeloma therapy
More than half of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma treated with carfilzomib experienced cardiac issues during treatment, according to a multi-institutional study published June 12, 2019 in Journal of Clinical Oncology. (2019-06-13)
Gut microbes eat our medication
Researchers have discovered one of the first concrete examples of how the microbiome can interfere with a drug's intended path through the body. (2019-06-13)
Researchers develop drug-targeting molecules to improve cancer treatment
A compound was developed from a new material, described as an easily injected hydrogel, which acts as a 'homing' cue to attract drug molecules to sites bearing a tumor. (2019-06-12)
Early release rules for prisoners at end of life may be 'discriminatory,' say doctors
Doctors are calling for reform to rules governing when terminally ill prisoners are suitable for early release on compassionate grounds (ERCG) amid concerns that the current approach is discriminatory. (2019-06-12)
Proof of sandwiched graphene-membrane superstructure opens up a membrane-specific drug delivery mode
Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Tsinghua University (THU) proved a sandwiched superstructure for graphene oxide (GO) that transport inside cell membranes for the first time. (2019-06-07)
Where to draw the line between mental health and illness?
Schizophrenia is considered an illness by nearly all Finns, while grief and homosexuality are not. (2019-06-06)
Could you fail a drug test by taking CBD? (video)
Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a non-psychoactive compound produced by the marijuana plant that seems to be everywhere these days. (2019-06-06)
Dietary supplements linked with severe health events in children, young adults
Consumption of dietary supplements sold for weight loss, muscle building, and energy was associated with increased risk for severe medical events in children and young adults compared to consumption of vitamins, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. (2019-06-05)
Study: New drug regimens improve outcomes for kidney transplant patients
Preliminary results from a $5.2 million clinical trial led by University of Cincinnati researchers show that the immunosuppressive drug belatacept can help safely and effectively treat kidney transplant patients without the negative long-term side effects of traditional immunosuppressive regimens, the study's leaders announced this week at the annual American Transplant Congress gathering. (2019-06-05)
Researchers develop breakthrough process to create cancer-killing drugs
A new strategy for drug development can be used to produce targeted therapies against a variety of diseases. (2019-06-04)
Immunotherapy drug found safe in treating cancer patients with HIV
The results of a study led by physicians at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center showed that patients living with HIV and one of a variety of potentially deadly cancers could be safely treated with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, also known by its brand name, KEYTRUDA. (2019-06-03)
Guidelines for managing anaphylaxis in children need an update
Treatment guidelines for managing anaphylaxis in children should be reassessed, according to a new Canadian study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. (2019-05-31)
What are the northern lights? (video)
Every winter, thousands of tourists head north hoping to catch a glimpse of the luminous auroras dancing in the sky. (2019-05-31)
Heartburn drugs linked to fatal heart and kidney disease, stomach cancer
A study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-05-30)
Energy researchers break the catalytic speed limit
A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota and University of Massachusetts Amherst has discovered new technology that can speed up chemical reactions 10,000 times faster than the current reaction rate limit. (2019-05-28)
Mathematically designed graphene has improved electrocatalytic activity
An international research group has improved graphene's ability to catalyze the 'hydrogen evolution reaction,' which releases hydrogen as a result of passing an electronic current through water. (2019-05-24)
Could there be life without carbon? (video)
One element is the backbone of all forms of life we've ever discovered on Earth: carbon. (2019-05-23)
How bacteria acquire antibiotic resistance in the presence of antibiotics
A new study's disconcerting findings reveal how antibiotic resistance is able to spread between bacteria cells despite the presence of antibiotics that should prevent them from growing. (2019-05-23)
Artificial photosynthesis transforms carbon dioxide into liquefiable fuels
Chemists at the University of Illinois have successfully produced fuels using water, carbon dioxide and visible light through artificial photosynthesis. (2019-05-22)
Synthesis of helical ladder polymers
Researchers at Kanazawa University synthesized helical ladder polymers with a well-defined cyclic repeating unit and one-handed helical geometry, as they reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2019-05-20)
Machine learning speeds modeling of experiments aimed at capturing fusion energy on Earth
Release describes application of machine learning form of artificial intelligence to predict the behavior of fusion plasma. (2019-05-17)
Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not
Customers who feel afraid in the wake of a data breach care more about the size and scope of the breach than do angry customers, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-05-16)
Young adults distressed by labels of narcissism, entitlement
Young adults both believe and react negatively to messages that members of their age group are more entitled and narcissistic than other living generations, suggests new research presented by Joshua Grubbs of Bowling Green State University, Ohio, and colleagues in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 15, 2019. (2019-05-15)
Jawless fish take a bite out of the blood-brain barrier
A jawless parasitic fish could help lead the way to more effective treatments for multiple brain ailments, including cancer, trauma and stroke. (2019-05-15)
Companies benefit from giving congressional testimony, study finds
Researchers studied the effect of congressional testimony given by representatives of large companies and found that investors responded favorably to several aspects of testimony. (2019-05-15)
Early in vitro testing for adverse effects on embryos
ETH researchers have combined embryonic cells and liver cells in a new cell culture test. (2019-05-14)
Serious adverse outcomes from respiratory tract infection are rare but predictable
In routine primary care practice, serious adverse outcomes occur in only 1% of adult patients with lower respiratory tract infection, but such outcomes may be predicted with moderate accuracy. (2019-05-14)
Inappropriate prescribing can lead to adverse outcomes
In older adults, inappropriate prescribing in primary care is associated with a wide range of adverse outcomes, but not mortality. (2019-05-14)
Researchers identify faster, more effective drug combinations to treat tuberculosis
Study describes a way to reduce the duration of tuberculosis treatment by using an approach called 'artificial intelligence-parabolic response surface' that allows researchers to quickly identify three or four drug combinations among billions of possible combinations to treat TB up to five times faster than current therapies. (2019-05-14)
Physician procedure volume linked to outcomes after surgical abortion
Although surgically induced abortion is a low-risk procedure, women whose physician infrequently performs it have almost twice the risk of severe complications, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-05-13)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Moving Forward
When the life you've built slips out of your grasp, you're often told it's best to move on. But is that true? Instead of forgetting the past, TED speakers describe how we can move forward with it. Guests include writers Nora McInerny and Suleika Jaouad, and human rights advocate Lindy Lou Isonhood.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...