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Current Advertising News and Events, Advertising News Articles.
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The prevention of childhood obesity would require stricter advertising regulations
Spain ranks fifth among European countries for childhood obesity. Sugar-sweetened beverages and soft drinks are consumed by 81% of Spanish children weekly. (2020-05-26)
Newspapers report on car safety recalls less when manufacturers advertise more with them
A new study looked at the relationship between advertising by car manufacturers in US newspapers and news coverage of car safety recalls in the early 2000s. (2020-05-21)
Most parents concerned about privacy, body image impact of tweens using health apps
Most parents say they have concerns about how health apps may impact children ages 8-12, according to the C.S. (2020-05-18)
The commercial consequences of collective layoffs
Layoff firms experience adverse changes in sales, advertising effectiveness, and price sensitivity. (2020-04-30)
Media bias with corporate social irresponsibility events
News media do not report corporate misconduct - such as environmental offenses or corruption - consistently and independently. (2020-04-29)
In politics and pandemics, trolls use fear, anger to drive clicks
A new CU Boulder study shows that Facebook ads developed and shared by Russian trolls around the 2016 election were clicked on nine times more than typical social media ads. (2020-03-26)
Corporate social irresponsibility: Which cases are critically reported -- and which aren't?
A new study on media reports about corporate misconduct in five countries shows that reporting or no reporting often depends on interests of the media companies. (2020-03-12)
Confusing standards lead to extra sugar in kids' breakfast cereals
Parents may let their children consume more sugar from their breakfast cereal than intended due to insufficient industry nutritional guidelines. (2020-03-06)
Alcohol marketing and underage drinking
A new study by a research team including scientists from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation provides a systematic review of research that examines relationships between exposure to alcohol marketing and alcohol use behaviors among adolescents and young adults. (2020-03-06)
Predicting intentional accounting misreporting
Taking a fine-tooth comb over the words in a firm's annual report, instead of the numbers, could better predict intentional misreporting, says SMU Assistant Professor Richard Crowley. (2020-03-01)
Highlighting product greenness may put consumers off buying
New research suggests that companies looking to promote their latest environmentally friendly product should downplay its green credentials if they want consumers to buy it. (2020-02-28)
Alcohol ads lead to youth drinking, should be more regulated, experts say
The marketing of alcoholic beverages is one cause of underage drinking, public health experts conclude. (2020-02-24)
Just as tobacco advertising causes teen smoking, exposure to alcohol ads causes teens to drink
Exposure to alcohol advertising changes teens' attitudes about alcohol and can cause them to start drinking, finds a new analysis led by NYU School of Global Public Health and NYU Grossman School of Medicine. (2020-02-24)
Studies gauge effect of soft drink taxation, advertising and labeling laws
Laws affecting the labeling, marketing and taxation of sugary soft drinks impact the behavior of both consumers and manufacturers, according to two studies published this week in PLOS Medicine. (2020-02-11)
Less advertising for high-calorie snacks on children's TV
The number of overweight children has increased significantly. Some food and beverage companies have signed a voluntary commitment at EU level to restrict advertising of foods high in fat, sugar and salt to children. (2020-02-05)
Ad spending on toddler milks increased four-fold from 2006 to 2015
Formula companies quadrupled their advertising of toddler milk products over a ten- year period, contributing to a 2.6 times increase in the amount of toddler milk sold, according to a new paper published in Public Health Nutrition from researchers at the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut. (2020-02-04)
Political TV ads referencing guns increased eightfold over four election cycles
The number of political candidate television advertisements that refer to guns increased significantly across four election cycles in US media markets, according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2020-02-03)
Study finds vaping prevention program significantly reduces use in middle school students
In response to the youth vaping crisis, experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) developed CATCH My Breath, a program to prevent electronic cigarette use among fifth - 12th grade students. (2020-01-30)
News aggregator websites play critical role in driving readers to media outlet websites
News aggregators help to simplify consumers' search for news stories by gathering content based on viewing history or other factors. (2020-01-21)
Researchers find that cookies increase ad revenue for online publishers
How long has it been since you logged onto a Web site and you were prompted to decide whether to opt out of 'cookies' that the site told you will enhance your online experience? (2020-01-17)
How successful are retailer-themed super saver events?
Retailer-Themed Super Saver Events (ReTSS) yield different outcomes than regular sales promotions. (2020-01-09)
Cigarette smoke damages our mental health, too
The researchers found that students who smoked had rates of clinical depression that were twice to three times higher than did their non-smoking peers. (2020-01-08)
People think marketing and political campaigns use psychology to influence their behaviors
A new study has shown that whilst people think advertising and political campaigns exploit psychological research to control their unconscious behaviors, ultimately they feel the choices they make are still their own. (2019-12-23)
Watching TV makes us prefer thinner women
The more TV we watch the more we prefer thinner female bodies, according to a new comprehensive study on body image. (2019-12-19)
A more intuitive online banking service would reinforce its use among the over-55s
The very nature of online banking is the cause of the reticence of the over-55s to use it as they do not feel comfortable navigating the 'digital world'. (2019-12-18)
Climate change legislation, media coverage drives oil companies' ad spending, study finds
An analysis led by an Institute at Brown for Environment and Society visiting professor found that oil companies ramp up advertising campaigns when they face negative media coverage or new regulations. (2019-12-17)
Advertising continues to assume mothers only use knowledge for domestic caring
Magazine adverts continue to tell mothers to put caring for their families front and centre - and encourage them to devote all their knowledge to protecting and caring for them rather than for their own benefit or professional advancement. (2019-12-10)
Social media could be a force for good in tackling depression but for privacy concerns
Social media has been identified by a number of studies as being a significant factor in mental health problems, especially in young people. (2019-12-03)
'Native advertising' builds credibility, not perceived as 'tricking' visitors
CATONSVILLE, MD, December 2, 2019 - The concept of ''native advertising'' has been in existence for as long as advertisements were designed to resemble the editorial content in newspapers and magazines. (2019-12-02)
Research: Alcohol and tobacco policies can reduce cancer deaths
Policies aimed at cutting alcohol and tobacco consumption, including the introduction of random breath testing programs and bans on cigarette advertising, have resulted in a significant reduction in Australian cancer death rates, new research shows. (2019-11-26)
Survey: Most teenagers in legalized states see marijuana marketing on social media
Despite restrictions on paid advertising cannabis on social media, most teenagers reported seeing marijuana marketing on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, according to a public health study authored by University of Massachusetts Amherst injury prevention researcher Jennifer Whitehill. (2019-11-21)
70% of teens surveyed engaged with food and beverage brands on social media in 2017
70% of teens surveyed report engaging with food and beverage brands on social media and 35 percent engaged with at least five brands, according to a new study from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. (2019-11-20)
Money spent on beer ads linked to underage drinking
Advertising budgets and strategies used by beer companies appear to influence underage drinking, according to new research. (2019-11-18)
What will make grandma use her Fitbit longer?
For older adults, Fitbits and other activity trackers may be popular gifts, but they may not be used for very long. (2019-11-18)
Inoculating against the spread of viral misinformation
In the first study of public health-related Facebook advertising, newly published in the journal Vaccine, researchers at the University of Maryland, the George Washington University and Johns Hopkins University show that a small group of anti-vaccine ad buyers has successfully leveraged Facebook to reach targeted audiences and that the social media platform's efforts to improve transparency have actually led to the removal of ads promoting vaccination and communicating scientific findings. (2019-11-14)
Researchers lift the curtain behind the 'black box' of data broker records
It's no longer news that our data is for sale. (2019-11-04)
Digital evidence falls short, can hurt victims of intimate partner violence
New research from LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication published in the International Journal of Communication shows digital evidence -- from tablets, smartphones, computers and other electronic communication methods -- can fall short of providing reliable legal evidence in cases of domestic and sexual assault, known as intimate partner violence. (2019-10-28)
Scientists discover new species of wasp-mimicking praying mantis
Cleveland Museum of Natural History Director of Research and Collections Dr. (2019-10-17)
Sweetened drinks represented 62% of children's drink sales in 2018
Fruit drinks and flavored waters that contained added sugars and/or low-calorie (diet) sweeteners dominated sales of drinks intended for children in 2018, making up 62% of the $2.2 billion in total children's drink sales. (2019-10-16)
Teen study reveals how schools influence e-cigarette use, outlines prevention strategies
When e-cigarettes hit the US market in 2007, they were promoted as a safer, healthier alternative to traditional, combustible cigarettes. (2019-09-30)
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