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Current Aerosols News and Events

Current Aerosols News and Events, Aerosols News Articles.
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Study: Reflecting sunlight to cool the planet will cause other global changes
Study finds reflecting sunlight to cool the planet will weaken extratropical storm tracks, causing other global changes. (2020-06-02)
COVID-19 could be a seasonal illness
A study conducted in Sydney, Australia, during the early epidemic stage of COVID-19 has found an association between lower humidity and an increase in locally acquired positive cases. (2020-06-01)
Atmospheric scientists identify cleanest air on Earth in first-of-its-kind study
A research group at Colorado State University identified an atmospheric region unchanged by human-related activities in the first study to measure bioaerosol composition of the Southern Ocean south of 40 degrees south latitude. (2020-06-01)
A potential explanation for urban smog
The effect of nitric acid on aerosol particles in the atmosphere may offer an explanation for the smog seen engulfing cities on frosty days. (2020-05-27)
As businesses reopen, it's crucial we wear masks, safely distance
In a perspective piece published today in the journal Science, UC San Diego experts describe in detail the growing evidence that SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, can be spread by asymptomatic people via aerosols -- a reality that deeply underscores the ongoing importance of regular widespread testing, wearing masks and physical distancing to reduce the spread of the virus. (2020-05-27)
Masks reduce airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2
Growing evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, can be spread by asymptomatic people via aerosols -- a reality that deeply underscores the ongoing importance of regular widespread testing, wearing masks and physical distancing to reduce the spread of the virus, say Kimberly Prather and colleagues in a new Perspective. (2020-05-27)
Evidence shows cloth masks may help against COVID-19
The international research team examined a century of evidence including recent data, and found strong evidence showing that cloth and cloth masks can reduce contamination of air and surfaces. (2020-05-25)
Using wastewater to monitor COVID-19
A recent review paper from an international research group shows how wastewater could provide a useful tool for monitoring COVID-19 and highlights the further research needed to develop this as a viable method for tracking virus outbreaks. (2020-05-24)
Fire aerosols decrease global terrestrial ecosystem productivity through changing climate
Cooling, drying, and light attenuation are major impacts of fire aerosols on the global terrestrial ecosystem productivity. (2020-05-20)
Study finds breathing and talking contribute to COVID-19 spread
Current knowledge about the role of aerosols in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 warrants urgent attention. (2020-05-07)
Study: Climate change has been influencing where tropical cyclones rage
While the global average number of tropical cyclones each year has not budged from 86 over the last four decades, climate change has been influencing the locations of where these deadly storms occur, according to new NOAA-led research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. (2020-05-04)
New understanding of asthma medicines could improve future treatment
New research has revealed new insights into common asthma aerosol treatments to aid the drug's future improvements which could benefit hundreds of millions of global sufferers. (2020-04-27)
The best material for homemade face masks may be a combination of two fabrics
In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people wear masks in public. (2020-04-24)
A new biosensor for the COVID-19 virus
A team of researchers from Empa, ETH Zurich and Zurich University Hospital has succeeded in developing a novel sensor for detecting the new coronavirus. (2020-04-21)
Wearing surgical masks in public could help slow COVID-19 pandemic's advance
Surgical masks may help prevent infected people from making others sick with seasonal viruses, including coronaviruses, according to new research. (2020-04-03)
How important is speech in transmitting coronavirus?
Normal speech by individuals who are asymptomatic but infected with coronavirus may produce enough aerosolized particles to transmit the infection, according to aerosol scientists at UC Davis. (2020-04-03)
Smaller than expected phytoplankton may mean less carbon sequestered at sea bottom
A study that included the first-ever winter sampling of phytoplankton in the North Atlantic revealed cells smaller than what scientists expected, meaning carbon sequestration models may be too optimistic. (2020-03-31)
Coral tells own tale about El Niño's past
Rice University and Georgia Tech scientists use data from ancient coral to build a record of temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last millennium. (2020-03-26)
Surprise! Ammonia emitted from fertilized paddy fields mostly doesn't end up in the air
A new study indicates that ammonia deposition in the neighborhood of sources can largely reduce the amount of emitted ammonia entering the atmosphere, and thus can reduce atmospheric ammonia pollution. (2020-03-20)
Study reveals how long COVID-19 remains infectious on cardboard, metal and plastic
The virus that causes COVID-19 remains for several hours to days on surfaces and in aerosols, a new scientific study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found. (2020-03-20)
The right dose of geoengineering could reduce climate change risks
Injecting the right dose of sulphur dioxide into Earth's upper atmosphere to thicken the layer of light reflecting aerosol particles artificially could reduce the effects of climate change overall, exacerbating change in only a small fraction of places, according to new research by UCL and Harvard. (2020-03-19)
New coronavirus stable for hours on surfaces
The virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is stable for several hours to days in aerosols and on surfaces, according to a new study from National Institutes of Health, CDC, UCLA and Princeton University scientists in NEJM. (2020-03-17)
First-time direct proof of chemical reactions in particulates
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have developed a new method to analyse particulate matter more precisely than ever before. (2020-03-13)
Scientists discover dust from Middle East cools the Red Sea
Researchers at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) have discovered dust from the Middle East has a positive cooling effect over the land and the Red Sea. (2020-02-26)
Vaping changes oral microbiome, increasing risk for infection
Using e-cigarettes alters the mouth's microbiome -- the community of bacteria and other microorganisms -- and makes users more prone to inflammation and infection, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. (2020-02-26)
E-cigarette users are exposed to potentially harmful levels of metal linked to DNA damage
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have completed a cross-sectional human study that compares biomarkers and metal concentrations in the urine of e-cigarette users, nonsmokers, and cigarette smokers. (2020-02-20)
How to deflect an asteroid
MIT engineers devise a decision map to identify the best mission type to deflect an incoming asteroid. (2020-02-19)
Do the climate effects of air pollution impact the global economy?
Aerosol emissions from burning coal and wood are dangerous to human health, but it turns out that by cooling the Earth they also diminish global economic inequality, according to a new study by Carnegie's Yixuan Zheng, Geeta Persad, and Ken Caldeira, along with UC Irvine's Steven Davis. (2020-02-17)
Agricultural area residents in danger of inhaling toxic aerosols
Excess selenium from fertilizers and other natural sources can create air pollution that could lead to lung cancer, asthma, and Type 2 diabetes, according to new UC Riverside research. (2020-02-03)
Study: Aerosols have an outsized impact on extreme weather
A reduction in manmade aerosols in Europe has been tied to a reduction in extreme winter weather in the region. (2020-02-03)
From smoke going round the world to aerosol levels, NASA observes Australia's bushfires
NASA scientists using data from its NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite, has traced the movement of the smoke coming off the Australian fires across the globe showing that it has circumnavigated the Earth. (2020-01-14)
Shutdown of coal-fired plants in US saves lives and improves crop yields
The decommissioning of coal-fired power plants in the continental United States has reduced nearby pollution and its negative impacts on human health and crop yields, according to a new University of California San Diego study. (2020-01-06)
NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite views New South Wales fires raging on
NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over the New South Wales fires in Australia on December 16, 2019 and found devastation from the ongoing fires. (2019-12-16)
Climate science: Amazon fires may enhance Andean glacier melting
Burning of the rainforest in southwestern Amazonia (the Brazilian, Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon) may increase the melting of tropical glaciers in the Andes, according to a study in Scientific Reports. (2019-11-28)
Clean carbon nanotubes with superb properties
Scientists at Aalto University, Finland, and Nagoya University, Japan, have found a new way to make ultra-clean carbon nanotube transistors with superior semiconducting properties. (2019-11-19)
New findings on the largest natural sulfur source in the atmosphere
An international research team was able to experimentally show in the laboratory a completely new reaction path for the largest natural sulfur source in the atmosphere. (2019-11-18)
Bushfires on east coast of Australia out of control
An unprecedented number of bushfires have erupted on the east coast of Australia due to hot, dry, windy weather. (2019-11-08)
Satellite tracking shows how ships affect clouds and climate
By matching the movement of ships to the changes in clouds caused by their emissions, researchers have shown how strongly the two are connected. (2019-11-05)
Intensified global monsoon extreme rainfall signals global warming -- A study
A new study reveals significant associations between global warming and the observed intensification of extreme rainfall over the global monsoon region and its several subregions, including the southern part of South Africa, India, North America and the eastern part of the South America. (2019-10-30)
How aerosols affect our climate
Greenhouse gases may get more attention, but aerosols -- from car exhaust to volcanic eruptions -- also have a major impact on the Earth's climate. (2019-10-17)
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