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Current Aerospace engineering News and Events, Aerospace engineering News Articles.
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Incorporating solar harvesting into the side of buildings could enhance energy sustainability
If builders could incorporate solar harvesting into the siding of a building, the amount of energy from the grid that a structure would need may significantly decrease. (2020-08-05)
Computational modeling enables heart valve visualizations
Computational modeling has provided new insights into the heart's vascular system, a complex and mechanically demanding system that remains poorly understood. (2020-08-05)
Analyzing pros and cons of two composite manufacturing methods
Airplane wings and wind turbine blades are typically created using bulk polymerization in composite manufacturing facilities. (2020-08-03)
Engineers find thinner tissues in replacement heart valves create problematic flutter
Iowa State and University of Texas engineers have developed high-fidelity computational models of replacement heart valves to examine the performance of biological tissues built into the valves. (2020-07-29)
In HEPA we trust: making the indoors safer during COVID
As schools and offices prepare to reopen, Syracuse University Professor Jianshun 'Jensen' Zhang offers a three-step plan to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) and help prevent the spread of COVID indoors. (2020-07-29)
Discovery of disordered nanolayers in intermetallic alloys
A research team led by scientists of City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has recently discovered the disordered nanoscale layers at grain boundaries in the ordered intermetallic alloys. (2020-07-24)
If relaxed too soon, physical distancing measures might have been all for naught
If physical distancing measures in the United States are relaxed while there is still no COVID-19 vaccine or treatment and while personal protective equipment remains in short supply, the number of resulting infections could be about the same as if distancing had never been implemented to begin with, reports a UCLA-led team of mathematicians and scientists. (2020-07-23)
Kazan University chemists offer a new look at polymers for space industry
Employees of the Department of Physical Chemistry of Kazan Federal University have found out that the mechanisms of polymerization of aryl cyanates in the solid state and in the melt differ in the number of broken multiple bonds of the monomer at the stage that determines the rate of the process. (2020-07-22)
Avoiding food contamination with a durable coating for hard surfaces
A new study from a team of University of Missouri engineers and food scientists demonstrates that a durable coating, made from titanium dioxide, is capable of eliminating foodborne germs, such as salmonella and E. coli, and provides a preventative layer of protection against future cross-contamination on stainless steel food-contact surfaces. (2020-07-16)
Spider silk made by photosynthetic bacteria
A research team in Japan reported that they succeeded in producing the spider silk -- ultra-lightweight, though, biodegradable and biocompatible material -- using photosynthetic bacteria. (2020-07-08)
Machine learning reveals vulnerabilities in 3D-printed carbon-fiber composites
Components made of glass- and carbon- fiber reinforced composites, soaring in high-performance applications, can be 3D printed. (2020-07-06)
Jellyfish-inspired soft robots can outswim their natural counterparts
Engineering researchers have developed soft robots inspired by jellyfish that can outswim their real-life counterparts. (2020-07-01)
Researchers use electric fields to herd cells like flocks of sheep
Princeton researchers have created a device that can herd groups of cells like sheep, precisely directing the cells' movements by manipulating electric fields to mimic those found in the body during healing. (2020-06-24)
Microbubbles controlled by acoustical tweezers for highly localized drug release
Microbubbles are used every day as contrast agents in medical sonography, and are the subject of intense research for the delivery of therapeutic agents. (2020-06-22)
Researchers make next-generation, high-toughness battery component
By combining a ceramic material with graphene, Brown University engineers have made what they say is the toughest solid electrolyte built to date. (2020-06-18)
Uncovering hidden flow patterns in coastal waters likely leads to faster disaster response
With more accurate modeling data, response teams can better predict the search area grid from the air, and reduce emergency response time when lives are on the line. (2020-06-17)
Amyloid formation in the International Space Station
The collaborative research team of Japan using the International Space Station (ISS) successfully characterized Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid fibril formation under microgravity conditions. (2020-06-16)
University of Melbourne to build and launch innovative satellite
Funding helps develop cutting edge space capabilities in Australia and collaboration with multiple Australian space industry companies and the Italian Space Agency (2020-06-16)
Directly printing 3D tissues within the body
In the TV series Westworld, human body parts are built on robotic frames using 3D printers. (2020-06-15)
A robot to track and film flying insects
French scientists have developed the first cable-driven robot that can follow and interact with free-flying insects. (2020-06-10)
These flexible feet help robots walk faster
Roboticists at the University of California San Diego have developed flexible feet that can help robots walk up to 40 percent faster on uneven terrain such as pebbles and wood chips. (2020-06-01)
Clever computing puts millions into charities' hands
Charities can now begin accessing millions of pounds more in donations thanks to a small shift in how people can donate. (2020-06-01)
Designing a flexible material to protect buildings, military personnel
Now, a team of engineers led by Guoliang Huang, a James C. (2020-05-26)
Measuring blood damage
Red blood cells sometimes rupture when blood is sent through faulty equipment, such as a dialysis machine. (2020-05-21)
Engineers develop low-cost, high-accuracy GPS-like system for flexible medical robots
Roboticists at the University of California San Diego have developed an affordable, easy to use system to track the location of flexible surgical robots inside the human body. (2020-05-18)
HKU super steel project attains major breakthrough
The Super Steel project led by Professor Huang Mingxin at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), with collaborators at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), has made important breakthrough in its new super D&P steel (produced using a new deformed and partitioned method) to greatly enhance its fracture resistance while maintaining super strong in strength for advanced industrial applications. (2020-05-12)
UCLA and Carnegie Mellon researchers develop real-time physics engine for soft robotics
Collaborators from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Carnegie Mellon University have adapted sophisticated computer graphics technology, used to create hair and fabric in animated films, to simulate the movements of soft, limbed robots for the first time. (2020-05-11)
Inspired by cheetahs, researchers build fastest soft robots yet
Inspired by the biomechanics of cheetahs, researchers have developed a new type of soft robot that is capable of moving more quickly on solid surfaces or in the water than previous generations of soft robots. (2020-05-08)
Plasma medicine research highlights antibacterial effects and potential uses
As interest in the application of plasma medicine -- the use of low-temperature plasma (LTP) created by an electrical discharge to address medical problems -- continues to grow, so does the need for research advancements proving its capabilities and potential impacts on the health care industry. (2020-05-08)
Suppressing spatter reduces random defects in metal 3D printing
Controlling spatter during laser powder bed fusion -- a form of 3D printing that uses metal as a medium -- reduces random defects and increases the overall reliability of built parts. (2020-05-07)
Sustainable structural material for plastic substitute
A team lead by Prof. Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report a high-performance sustainable structural material called cellulose nanofiber plate (CNFP) which is constructed from bio-based CNF and ready to replace the plastic in many fields. (2020-05-01)
UCF researchers develop groundbreaking new rocket-propulsion system
A University of Central Florida researcher and his team have developed an advanced new rocket-propulsion system once thought to be impossible. (2020-04-30)
'Breathable' electronics pave the way for more functional wearable tech
Engineering researchers have created ultrathin, stretchable electronic material that is gas permeable, allowing the material to 'breathe.' The material was designed specifically for use in biomedical or wearable technologies, since the gas permeability allows sweat and volatile organic compounds to evaporate away from the skin, making it more comfortable for users -- especially for long-term wear. (2020-04-30)
Learning from fish and flags to inform new propulsion strategies
Recent research by Andres J. Goza at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found relationships between frequencies and the passive dynamics at play when vehicles move in air or water toward a better understanding of how to use these forces to enhance performance. (2020-04-29)
A great new way to paint 3D-printed objects
Rutgers engineers have created a highly effective way to paint complex 3D-printed objects, such as lightweight frames for aircraft and biomedical stents, that could save manufacturers time and money and provide new opportunities to create ''smart skins'' for printed parts. (2020-04-28)
Electronics for high-altitude use can get smaller and sturdier with new nanomaterials
Demand is growing for new materials that can be printed at ever smaller dimensions. (2020-04-27)
Environment-friendly compound shows promise for solar cell use
In research published today in Advanced Functional Materials, a team of engineers, material scientists, and physicists demonstrated how a new material -- a lead-free chalcogenide perovskite -- that hadn't previously been considered for use in solar cells could provide a safer and more effective option than others that are commonly considered. (2020-04-24)
Thermal tides cause Venus' atmosphere to rotate far faster than its surface
By tracking the thick clouds of Venus' rapidly rotating atmosphere, researchers have gained new insight into the dynamic forces that drive atmospheric super-rotation - a little-understood phenomenon in which an atmosphere rotates much faster than the solid planetary body below. (2020-04-23)
A breakthrough in estimating the size of a (mostly hidden) network
A newly discovered connection between control theory and network dynamical systems could help estimate the size of a network even when a small portion is accessible. (2020-04-22)
USGS releases first-ever comprehensive geologic map of the Moon
For the first time, the entire lunar surface has been completely mapped and uniformly classified. (2020-04-22)
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