Nav: Home

Current Affordable care act News and Events

Current Affordable care act News and Events, Affordable care act News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Roadmap to reducing colorectal cancer deaths
The American Gastroenterological Association has outlined a strategy to increase the number of people screened via tests that are more convenient, accurate and less expensive and tailored to people's individual cancer risks. (2020-08-03)
Medicaid-covered mothers have less say in birthing experience: BU study
Giving birth in the United States is a radically different experience based on race and income, illustrated most brutally by the Black and Indigenous maternal mortality crisis. (2020-07-28)
Same-day IUD placements hard to come by in Ohio, study finds
Though same-day access to IUDs increases the likelihood a woman will get the reproductive health care she wants and decreases the chance she'll become pregnant when she doesn't plan to, most providers in Ohio don't offer the service, a new study has found. (2020-07-27)
Narcissists don't learn from their mistakes because they don't think they make any
When most people find that their actions have resulted in an undesirable outcome, they tend to rethink their decisions and ask, ''What should I have done differently to avoid this outcome?'' When narcissists face the same situation, however, their refrain is, ''No one could have seen this coming!'' In refusing to acknowledge that they have made a mistake, narcissists fail to learn from those mistakes, a recent study from Oregon State University - Cascades found. (2020-07-22)
UK's Modern Slavery Act challenging for universities -- new study
The UK's universities are struggling to live up to the spirit and ambition of the Modern Slavery Act, hampered by poor oversight of their supply chains, a lack of skills and resource in supply chain management, a focus on reducing costs, and lacklustre engagement from many in senior management, a new study from the University of Bath shows. (2020-07-21)
Does "naming and shaming" of colleges with large tuition increases make a difference?
A study published in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis today found that the U.S. (2020-07-16)
When you're 84...What should life look like as we age?
What will your life look like when you're 84? When a health system leader put that question to Lewis A. (2020-07-16)
New, remote weight-loss method helped slash pounds
A new Northwestern Medicine remote weight-loss program, called Opt-IN, provides maximum weight loss for the lowest cost and with much less hassle than the gold-standard National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), the most successful behavioral non-drug treatment currently available. (2020-07-14)
The five phases of pandemic care for primary care
The authors present a roadmap for necessary primary care practice transformations to care for patients and communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-07-14)
Correlations identified between insurance coverage and states' voting patterns
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University reviewed national data from the U.S. (2020-07-14)
Cost prevents one in five US women from using their preferred contraception
Recent Supreme Court Ruling Will Increase Birth Control Costs for Many Women, Make it Less Likely They Will Use the Birth Control They Want (2020-07-13)
Access to nature requires attention when addressing community health needs
Nature is a tool to address deeply entrenched health disparities; health systems should work to increase nature access, as they have with other social determinants of health. (2020-07-09)
Rochester community initiative increases teenage use of effective contraception
Study finds that teenagers in Rochester utilize Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC) at a rate five times higher than the United States as a whole. (2020-07-09)
Value-based payments disproportionately impact safety-net hospitals
A new study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, in collaboration with Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, shows that value-based incentive programs aimed at reducing health care-associated infections did not improve infection rates in either safety-net or non-safety-net hospitals. (2020-07-08)
Study finds decreased rates of high-cost care after a community development initiative
More than a decade into the community development initiative called Healthy Neighborhoods Healthy Families, the 30-block Southern Orchards neighborhood on Columbus, Ohio's South Side had clear, notable improvement. (2020-07-08)
Stress testing 'coral in a box'
Save the corals: Mobile rapid test to assess coral thermotolerance developed in an international collaboration with the University of Konstanz (2020-07-08)
Study indicates that Medicaid expansion has led to earlier cancer detection among individuals with low income
New research found that the likelihood of being diagnosed with advanced cancer decreased among individuals with low income after expansion of Medicaid coverage. (2020-07-06)
Patients may be exposed to hormone-disrupting chemicals in medication, medical supplies
Health care providers may unintentionally expose patients to endocrine- disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by prescribing certain medications and using medical supplies, according to a perspective published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-07-02)
Medicaid expansion, association with breast cancer stage at diagnosis
Researchers investigated the association between the stage of breast cancer at diagnosis and the insurance status, age and race/ethnicity of patients before and after the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. (2020-07-01)
A new synthesis of poly heterocyclic compounds: Expected anti-cancer reagents
In this article, we have described a new practical cyclocondensation synthesis for a series of [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-c]pyrido[3,2-e] pyrimidine and pyrido[2',3':4,5] pyrimido[6,1-c][1,2,4] triazine from 2-amino-3-cyano-4.6-diarylpyridines. (2020-06-22)
Study finds Oregon's gender-affirming health care good on paper; still lacking in practice
While Oregon ranks highly nationwide for its gender-affirming policies and health care for transgender women, many of those polices are not fully realized in practice, a recent study from Oregon State University found. (2020-06-17)
Cost, distance from hospitals present barriers to surgical care
A Rutgers-led study in Colombia can help health care providers across the globe develop plans to improve surgical care access in their regions. (2020-06-11)
18.2 million at increased risk of severe COVID-19 uninsured or underinsured: Harvard study
Harvard researchers found that 18.2 million Americans who are at increased risk of severe COVID-19 due to age and underlying health conditions were also either uninsured or underinsured. (2020-06-10)
Ebola transmission risks would be taken more seriously with ground-up interventions
A study led by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found significant differences in disease risk perception and channels of information about Ebola virus disease (EVD) in rural areas and urban centres of Guinea, West Africa. (2020-06-10)
AI sentencing tools need to be closely scrutinised, says new study
Judges should closely vet the AI tools they use to help them predict whether a defendant is likely to re offend, urges a new study. (2020-06-09)
Physicists create quantum-inspired optical sensor
Researchers from the MIPT, joined by a colleague from Argonne National Laboratory, U.S., have implemented an advanced quantum algorithm for measuring physical quantities using simple optical tools. (2020-06-05)
People with Type 1 diabetes spend $2,500 a year in health care costs
Adults and children with type 1 diabetes will spend an average of $2,500 a year out-of-pocket for health care -- but insulin isn't always the biggest expense -- new research suggests. (2020-06-01)
Academic emergency departments are always open to all who need care
''Academic emergency departments never deny emergency care to any person.'' That is the statement put forth in a commentary from the Board of Directors of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the Senior Editorial Board of Academic Emergency Medicine journal. (2020-06-01)
Paid sick leave mandates hold promise in containing COVID-19
Paid sick leave (PSL) mandates like those found in the federal government's Families First Coronavirus Response Act may be helping to slow the spread of COVID-19, according to a new study by health economists at Georgia State and Tulane universities. (2020-05-29)
Public option would lower health premiums, but not greatly expand coverage
State and federal lawmakers have expressed interest in creating a public health insurance option, with four different bills that would create a federal public option being introduced in the Congress in 2019. (2020-05-28)
Study: Benefits of workplace wellness programs underwhelming
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign studied the efficacy of workplace wellness programs and found only a modest impact on employee health, health beliefs and medical utilization. (2020-05-26)
Flow-through electrodes make hydrogen 50 times faster
Duke chemists tested three new materials as a porous, flow-through electrode to make hydrogen from electrolysis. (2020-05-26)
Women in criminal justice system less likely to receive treatment for opioid use
Pregnant women involved in the criminal justice system are disproportionately not receiving medications for opioid use disorder, as compared to their peers, according to a Vanderbilt-led study published today in PLOS Medicine. (2020-05-19)
New article in Pediatric Research: A roadmap for critical COVID-19 research in children
Increasing reports of severe COVID-19 illness in children -- coupled with the fact that little is known about how and why the disease may behave differently in this younger population -- demand that a set of critical steps be taken now to ensure children get the attention they need, according to an article just published in Pediatric Research. (2020-05-18)
Affordable Care Act linked to better heart failure care for minorities, yet disparities persist
Heart failure patients from underserved racial or ethnic groups who live in states that have adopted the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid Expansion are more likely to receive recommended medical care than if they live in states that did not adopt the ACA Medicaid Expansion. (2020-05-15)
What we can learn from Singapore's COVID-19 containment response in primary care
Singapore, a global hub for international travel and business, was among the first countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-12)
Trouble getting a doctor's appointment may drive Medicaid enrollees to opt for the ER
The expansion of Medi-Cal, California's Medicaid program, gave millions of low-income Californians access to health insurance, but this study conducted in Northern California found that new patients may have to wait up up to a month for an appointment with a participating primary care provider, depending on their county of residence. (2020-05-12)
Primary care practice transformation introduces different staff types
The Comprehensive Primary Care initiative was launched in 2012 by the CMS Innovation Center as a four-year multi-payer initiative designed to strengthen primary care. (2020-05-12)
Primary care case management among frequent users with chronic conditions
Case management is an effective, collaborative, and cost-effective way to help frequent users of health care services integrate all aspects of their care. (2020-05-12)
After cancer: The role of primary care in cancer survivorship care
Primary care physicians are treating an increasing number of cancer survivors, yet they have no clear guidance on how best to care for such patients. (2020-05-12)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Processing The Pandemic
Between the pandemic and America's reckoning with racism and police brutality, many of us are anxious, angry, and depressed. This hour, TED Fellow and writer Laurel Braitman helps us process it all.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#568 Poker Face Psychology
Anyone who's seen pop culture depictions of poker might think statistics and math is the only way to get ahead. But no, there's psychology too. Author Maria Konnikova took her Ph.D. in psychology to the poker table, and turned out to be good. So good, she went pro in poker, and learned all about her own biases on the way. We're talking about her new book "The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Invisible Allies
As scientists have been scrambling to find new and better ways to treat covid-19, they've come across some unexpected allies. Invisible and primordial, these protectors have been with us all along. And they just might help us to better weather this viral storm. To kick things off, we travel through time from a homeless shelter to a military hospital, pondering the pandemic-fighting power of the sun. And then, we dive deep into the periodic table to look at how a simple element might actually be a microbe's biggest foe. This episode was reported by Simon Adler and Molly Webster, and produced by Annie McEwen and Pat Walters. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.