Nav: Home

Current Africa News and Events

Current Africa News and Events, Africa News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Research brief: Origin of deadly wheat pathogen revealed
A team of researchers has uncovered the basis of stem rust pathogen Ug99's wide virulence, attacking a direct threat to the world wheat supply. (2019-11-07)
Ancient roman DNA reveals genetic crossroads of Europe and Mediterranean
All roads may lead to Rome, and in ancient times, a great many European genetic lineages did too, according to a new study. (2019-11-07)
The genetic imprint of Palaeolithic has been detected in North African populations
Researchers led by David Comas for the first time performed an analysis of the complete genome of the population of North Africa. (2019-11-06)
Online tool speeds response to elephant poaching by tracing ivory to source
A new tool uses an interactive database of geographic and genetic information to quickly identify where the confiscated tusks of African elephants were originally poached. (2019-11-01)
The last Neanderthal necklace
For the first time, researchers found evidence of the ornamental uses of eagle talons in the Iberian Peninsula. (2019-11-01)
Migratory birds are worse off in West Africa
Migratory sandpipers breeding in Greenland who choose to spend the winter in West Africa instead of elsewhere along the East Atlantic coast have a lower chance of survival, are more likely to skip their first breeding season and arrive later at their breeding grounds. (2019-10-29)
The homeland of modern humans
A landmark study pinpoints the birthplace of modern humans in southern Africa and suggests how past climate shifts drove their first migration. (2019-10-28)
Daylight not rain most important for Africa 'green-up' phenomenon
Contrary to popular belief, seasonal rains are not the most important factor for starting the growth cycle of plants across Africa. (2019-10-25)
Survey completeness of a global citizen-science database of bird occurrence
There are many shortfalls in knowledge of the world's biodiversity, and one of the most basic is the lack of knowledge about where species occur geographically. (2019-10-22)
Large-scale afforestation of African savannas will destroy valuable ecosystems
In a technical comment, published in Science, a group of 46 scientists from around the world argue that the suggested afforestation of large areas of Africa to mitigate climate change will destroy valuable ecological, agricultural, and tourist areas, while doing little to reduce global CO2 levels. (2019-10-21)
Ugandans and Kenyans in cities happy to pay for food that is more nutritious
Ugandans and Kenyans in poor urban households are willing to pay a premium for more nutritious flour, new research shows. (2019-10-18)
Is there evidence of the 'immigrant health paradox' among Arab Americans?
In a study published in the Journal of American Public Health, researchers find little evidence of the 'immigrant health paradox' among Arab American immigrants living in California. (2019-10-17)
Global model reveals a future without nature's crucial contributions to humanity
A new model that captures nature's contributions to human wellbeing and compares them to peoples' future needs shows that, within the next thirty years, as many five billion people could face water and food insecurity -- particularly in Africa and South Asia. (2019-10-10)
No soil left behind: How a cost-effective technology can enrich poor fields
Many farmers across sub-Saharan Africa try to coax crops out of sandy soils that are not ideal for holding water and nutrients. (2019-10-09)
The Lancet HIV: Severe anti-LGBT legislations associated with lower testing and awareness of HIV in African countries
This first systematic review to investigate HIV testing, treatment and viral suppression in men who have sex with men in Africa finds that among the most recent studies (conducted after 2011) only half of men have been tested for HIV in the past 12 months. (2019-10-07)
UNAIDS HIV targets will be missed among gay men in Africa, study suggests
Despite improvements in HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Africa, many are missing out on HIV treatment. (2019-10-07)
African evidence support Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis
A team of scientists from South Africa has discovered evidence partially supporting a hypothesis that Earth was struck by a meteorite or asteroid 12,800 years ago, leading to global consequences including climate change, and contributing to the extinction of many species of large animals at the time of an episode called the Younger Dryas. (2019-10-02)
Child deaths in Africa could be prevented by family planning
Children under 5 years of age in Africa are much more likely to die as a direct result of poor health linked to air pollution, unsafe water, lack of sanitation, increased family size, and environmental degradation, according to the first continent-wide investigation of its kind. (2019-09-30)
West Africa: human-induced air pollution is higher than expected
Emissions of volatile organic pollutants in West Africa are 100 to 150 times higher than current estimates for the region. (2019-09-24)
New AI app predicts climate change stress for farmers in Africa
A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool available for free in a smartphone app can predict near-term crop productivity for farmers in Africa and may help them protect their staple crops -- such as maize, cassava and beans -- in the face of climate warming, according to Penn State researchers. (2019-09-23)
Starting HIV treatment in ERs may be key to ending HIV spread worldwide
In a follow-up study conducted in South Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that hospital emergency departments (EDs) worldwide may be key strategic settings for curbing the spread of HIV infections in hard-to-reach populations if the EDs jump-start treatment and case management as well as diagnosis of the disease. (2019-09-16)
Advanced breeding paves the way for disease-resistant beans
ETH researchers are involved in the development and implementation of a method to efficiently breed for disease-resistant beans in different regions of the world. (2019-09-11)
Scientists solve lingering mystery of poorly understood frog
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at McMaster University, has solved a centuries-old mystery of 'Fraser's Clawed Frog', an unusual and elusive species found in West Africa. (2019-09-11)
What the noggin of modern humans' ancestor would have looked like
Despite having lived about 300,000 years ago, the oldest ancestor of all members of our species had a surprisingly modern skull -- as suggested by a model created by CNRS researcher Aurélien Mounier and Cambridge University professor Marta Mirazón Lahr. (2019-09-10)
Hidden danger from pet dogs in Africa
Researchers at the Universities of Abuja and Nigeria, in collaboration with the University of Bristol, have detected a potentially human-infective microbe in pet dogs in Nigeria. (2019-09-09)
Diversity of Plasmodium falciparum across Sub-Saharan Africa
Scientists from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research joined a network of scientists to publish a study in Science to identify a regional character to Plasmodium falciparum across Africa. (2019-09-05)
Evolution: Ancient teeth shed light on Miocene 'mouse' migration
A new species of prehistoric murine -- the group of mammals that includes mice, rats, and their relatives -- has been identified from fossils discovered in Lebanon. (2019-08-29)
First direct evidence for mantle plume origin of Jurassic flood basalts in southern Africa
A group of geochemists from Finland and Mozambique suggests they have found the smoking gun in the Karoo magma province. (2019-08-26)
Bribery linked with difficulty accessing healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa
In a large survey in sub-Saharan Africa, adults who said they had paid a bribe for healthcare in the past year were more than four times as likely to report difficulty in obtaining care than those who had not paid bribes. (2019-08-21)
Satellite study reveals that area emits one billion tonnes of carbon
A vast region of Africa affected by drought and changing land use emits as much carbon dioxide each year as 200 million cars, research suggests. (2019-08-13)
Observation-driven research to inform better groundwater management policies
Groundwater maintains vital ecosystems and strongly influences water and energy budgets. (2019-08-07)
Groundwater resources in Africa resilient to climate change
Groundwater -- a vital source of water for drinking and irrigation across sub-Saharan Africa -- is resilient to climate variability and change, according to a new study led by UCL and Cardiff University. (2019-08-07)
Wits University PhD student discovers new species of early dinosaur
The team of scientists, led by PhD Student Kimberley Chapelle, recognised that the dinosaur was not only a new species of sauropodomorph, but an entirely new genus. (2019-08-06)
'Fake news,' diminishing media trust and the role of social media
Exploring the perception of the 'fake news' phenomenon is critical to combating the ongoing global erosion of trust in the media according to a study co-authored by a University of Houston researcher. (2019-08-01)
African smoke is fertilizing Amazon rainforest and oceans, new study finds
A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami's (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that smoke from fires in Africa may be the most important source of a key nutrient -- phosphorus -- that acts as a fertilizer in the Amazon rainforest, Tropical Atlantic and Southern oceans. (2019-07-29)
Paleontology -- new light on cichlid evolution in Africa
A collaborative research project carried out under the auspices of the GeoBio-Center at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has developed an integrative approach to the classification of fossil cichlids, and identified the oldest known member of the tribe Oreochromini. (2019-07-25)
HPTN 071 modelling and cost analyses show benefits of community HIV testing and treatment
Continuation of community-wide HIV testing and prompt initiation of treatment as delivered in the HPTN 071 (PopART) study in South Africa and Zambia could lead to substantial reductions in new HIV cases, be cost-effective, and help to achieve the UNAIDS 2030 targets, according to projections from mathematical modelling and cost-effectiveness analyses presented today at the 10th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science in Mexico City (IAS 2019). (2019-07-22)
Access to contraception not 'silver bullet' to stem population growth in Africa
The population of sub-Saharan Africa is set to double by 2050, yet a new study challenges a common misconception that this is caused solely by inadequate family planning. (2019-07-18)
Long live the long-limbed African chicken
For generations, household farmers in the Horn of Africa have selectively chosen chickens with certain traits that make them more appealing. (2019-07-16)
New species of tree discovered in Tanzania mountains
Researchers have discovered a new species of tree in the Usambara Mountains in Tanzania, part of the Eastern Arc Mountains, and a globally important region for species in need of conservation. (2019-07-16)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.