Current Aggression News and Events

Current Aggression News and Events, Aggression News Articles.
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The very hungry, angry caterpillars
In the absence of milkweed--their favorite food--monarch butterfly caterpillars (Danaus plexippus) go from peaceful feeders to aggressive fighters. Researchers reporting in the journal iScience on November 19 observed that caterpillars with less access to food were more likely to lunge at others to knock them aside, and caterpillars were most aggressive during the final stages before metamorphosis. (2020-11-19)

Very hungry and angry, caterpillars head-butt to get what they want
When food is scarce, monarch butterfly caterpillars go from docile to domineering. The results look something like a combination of boxing and ''bumper'' cars. The less food, the more likely caterpillars were to try to head-butt each other out of the way to get their fill, lunging and knocking aside other caterpillars to ensure their own survival. And, they are most aggressive right before the final stages of their metamorphosis. (2020-11-19)

Review examines sexual aggression in mammals
A recent review of published studies in non-human mammals examines 'sexual disturbance,' or male behavior towards a female around mating that can be costly for the female -- for example, that might inflict physical harm or cause mother-offspring separation. The findings are published in Mammal Review. (2020-11-18)

Cynical hostility presents a potential pathway to cardiovascular disease
Cynical hostility is a potential pathway to cardiovascular disease by preventing a healthy response to stress over time, according to a Baylor University study. (2020-11-16)

Soldiers benefit from psychological health research
Army scientists developed computer-based training to help Soldiers avoid unnecessary social conflict and mitigate anger-related outcomes. (2020-11-09)

Female mongooses start battles for chance to mate
Female banded mongooses lead their groups into fights then try to mate with enemy males in the chaos of battle, new research shows. (2020-11-09)

Mountain gorillas are good neighbours - up to a point
Mountain gorilla groups are friendly to familiar neighbours - provided they stay out of ''core'' parts of their territory - new research shows. (2020-10-28)

Most dentists have experienced aggression from patients
Roughly half of US dentists experienced verbal or reputational aggression by patients in the past year, and nearly one in four endured physical aggression, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. (2020-10-26)

Social isolation exacerbates the situation of school bullying victims
A study from the University of Cordoba (Spain) analyzed degrees of acceptance, popularity and friendship at different stages of victimization in the field of school bullying (2020-10-21)

Telehealth trains parents to improve behavior skills of children with autism
Training parents of children with autism spectrum disorder virtually about early behavioral intervention is an accessible and effective approach during the coronavirus pandemic or in other instances when in-person instruction is not possible, according to a Rutgers researcher. (2020-10-06)

Cognitive flexibility training manages responses to social conflict
Scientists at the WRAIR and ARL developed a computer-based training to reduce anger, reactive aggression and hostile attribution bias--the tendency to attribute hostile intent to the actions of others--in ambiguous social conflict situations. HAB and unwarranted anger can jeopardize social bonds, team culture and team performance. It is also linked to post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and other behavioral health concerns. Researchers showed the HBMT was effective up to 96 hours after the training. (2020-09-30)

'Attack Helicopters' an online sub-culture to watch out for
Who identifies sexually as an 'attack helicopter?'' According to new QUT-led research some 'Incels' do, and while 'trolls' have been around almost as long as the Internet, the researchers say 'Incels' are a more recent and distinctly different cyber sub-culture which warrants more study. Their findings have just been published by open access journal First Monday. (2020-09-03)

Swans reserve aggression for each other
Swans display more aggression to fellow swans than other birds, new research shows. (2020-08-18)

Study shows how a single gene drives aggression in wild songbird
A new study shows how differentiation of a single gene changes behavior in a wild songbird, determining whether the white-throated sparrow displays more, or less, aggression. (2020-08-18)

Prenatal depression alters child's brain connectivity, affects behavior
Altered brain connectivity may be one way prenatal depression influences child behavior, according to new research in JNeurosci. (2020-08-10)

Anti-bullying PEACE program packs a punch
Italian high schools have reported success with a South Australian program to help victims of bullying and aggression. The Preparation, Education. Action, Coping, Evaluation (PEACE) antibullying program, developed at Flinders University, has been adapted by several state education systems in Europe, with the intervention used in 22 Italian classes in a 2019-20 study. (2020-08-03)

Brain cell types identified that may push males to fight and have sex
Two groups of nerve cells may serve as ''on-off switches'' for male mating and aggression, suggests a new study in rodents. These neurons appear to send signals between two parts of the brain - the back tip, or posterior, of the amygdala and the hypothalamus - that together regulate emotions including fear, anxiety, and aggression. (2020-07-27)

Group genomics drive aggression in honey bees
Researchers often study the genomes of individual organisms to try to tease out the relationship between genes and behavior. A new study of Africanized honey bees reveals, however, that the genetic inheritance of individual bees has little influence on their propensity for aggression. Instead, the genomic traits of the hive as a whole are strongly associated with how fiercely its soldiers attack. (2020-07-06)

York study: European ancestry plays role in 'killer' honey bees' aggressiveness
What causes African hybrid honey bees (AHB) or killer bees to be highly defensive and aggressive? York University researchers found it was the mixing of African and European genetics that led to hyper-aggression in this invasive strain of honey bees. Researchers in Brazil imported a honey bee subspecies from South African in the 1950s and bred them with European-derived honey bees, but bees escaped and mated with the local bees - an experiment gone wrong. (2020-07-05)

Tiny brains, big surprise: Eavesdropping wasps gain insights about fighting abilities of potential rivals
Paper wasps eavesdrop on fighting rivals to rapidly assess potential opponents without personal risk. This new finding adds to mounting evidence that even mini-brained insects have an impressive capacity to learn, remember and make social deductions about others. (2020-06-25)

Medicinal cannabis may reduce behavioral problems in kids with intellectual disabilities
Cannabidiol, a type of medicinal cannabis, may reduce severe behavioural problems in children and adolescents with an intellectual disability a new study has found. (2020-06-24)

What does the "love hormone" do? It's complicated
Much of what we know about the actions of neuromodulators like oxytocin comes from behavioral studies of lab animals in standard lab conditions. These conditions are strictly controlled and artificial, in part so that researchers can limit the number of variables affecting behavior. A number of recent studies suggest that the actions of a mouse in a semi-natural environment can teach us much more about natural behavior, and maybe apply those findings to humans. (2020-06-21)

Fighting fish synchronize their combat moves and their gene expression
When two betta fish are fighting for dominance, not only do their attacks mirror each other, but the gene expression in their brain cells also starts to align. The new findings, published June 17th in PLOS Genetics by Norihiro Okada of Kitasato University, Japan, may explain how the fish synchronize their fighting behavior. (2020-06-17)

Bees? Please. These plants are putting ants to work
This is the first plant species in the world found to have adapted traits that enables a mutually beneficial relationship with ants. (2020-06-10)

Twitter fight: Birds use social networks to pick opponents wisely
In a new article published in the journal Current Opinion in Psychology, UC biologist Elizabeth Hobson says animals such as monk parakeets seem to understand where they fit in a dominance hierarchy and pick their fights accordingly. This high-level social information helps animals improve or maintain their status. (2020-06-09)

Pinker flamingos more aggressive
Bright pink flamingos are more aggressive than paler rivals when fighting over food, new research shows. (2020-06-07)

How experiencing traumatic stress leads to aggression
Traumatic stress can cause aggression by strengthening two brain pathways involved in emotion, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. Targeting those pathways via deep brain stimulation may stymie aggression associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. (2020-05-18)

Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. A significant minority, though, can become truly addicted to video games and as a result can suffer mentally, socially and behaviorally. (2020-05-13)

New insights into how genes control courtship and aggression
Fruit flies, like many animals, engage in a variety of courtship and fighting behaviors. Now, Salk scientists have uncovered the molecular mechanisms by which two sex-determining genes affect fruit fly behavior. The male flies' courtship and aggression behaviors, they showed, are mediated by two distinct genetic programs. The findings demonstrate the complexity of the link between sex and behavior. (2020-04-28)

Tailoring treatment for triple-negative breast cancer
Triple-negative breast cancer is a particularly aggressive form of the disease with no specific treatment. In a new study led by the University of Pennsylvania's Rumela Chakrabarti, researchers discovered that, in contrast to many other cancer types, activation of the interferon gamma signaling contributes to disease progression and spread. The findings may help doctors choose a personalized treatment strategy for triple-negative breast cancer patients, depending on their cancer subtype. (2020-04-13)

Emotional abuse, neglect affect adolescent depression differently by gender, ethnicity
Research shows that physical and sexual abuse are risk factors for depression in adolescents. However, we know less about the differences between emotional abuse and neglect as critical risk factors in teenage depression. A new longitudinal study examined the depressive effects of these different types of maltreatment among a group of youth at risk of being maltreated. The study found that emotional abuse and neglect affect adolescent depression differently depending on gender and ethnicity. (2020-03-31)

Birds exposed to PCBs as nestlings show behavior changes as adults
According to a new study, Zebra Finches exposed to low levels of environmental PCBs as nestlings show changes in breeding behavior as adults. (2020-03-26)

Two hormones drive anemonefish fathering, aggression
Two brain-signaling molecules control how anemonefish dads care for their young and respond to nest intruders, researchers report in a new study. Because there are many similarities in brain structure between fish and humans, the findings offer insight into the fundamental nature of parental care, the scientists say. (2020-03-16)

Zoology: Western gorillas may be territorial
Groups of western gorillas may defend the centres of their home ranges against neighbouring groups, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. These findings may suggest that western gorillas are territorial. (2020-03-12)

Animal behavior: Anxieties and problematic behaviors may be common in pet dogs
Anxieties and behavior problems may be common across dog breeds, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that noise sensitivity is the most common anxiety trait, followed by fear. (2020-03-05)

Reducing problem behaviors for children with autism
Self-inflicted injury, aggression toward others and yelling are common problem behaviors associated with young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. These actions can result from the child being denied attention or access to items they enjoy, as well as from internal discomfort or environmental stressors such as noise or large crowds. (2020-03-04)

There's a better way to think about being kept waiting at work
Generally, abstract thinking leads to better outcomes, such as more creativity, wider vision and feeling more powerful. However, in the paper published in the Journal of Organizational Behavior (2020), Efrat-Triester, and UBC researchers Michael Daniels and Sandra Robinson demonstrate that abstract thinking can also lead to undesired outcomes in stressful situations, such as waiting. (2020-02-24)

A study of economic compensation for victims of sexual violence in Europe
A study carried out by researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) analyzes the efficiency of the Spanish system of economically compensating the victims of sexual violence. This work has been undertaken within the framework of FAIRCOM, a European project coordinated by the UC3M. (2020-02-24)

Paying attention to complaints can protect nurses from violence
New UBC research shows, for the first time, a clear link between patient complaints and violence towards nurses. When nurses are overworked, they often cannot provide the high level of care they want to. This may lead to complaints from patients and their families, which can escalate into violence if not addressed. By addressing these complaints and reducing workload pressures, health care organizations could improve the wellbeing of their patients, patients' families, and employees. (2020-02-20)

How ants get angry: Precise 'lock and key' process regulates aggression, acceptance
In a new study, scientists at Vanderbilt report definitive evidence of a mechanism within ants that is responsible for unlocking aggression. The research--the first to pinpoint this mechanism and its precise role in ant biology--reports a social characteristic which could help account for their evolutionary success. (2020-02-03)

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