Nav: Home

Current Aggression News and Events

Current Aggression News and Events, Aggression News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 968 Results
Anti-bullying PEACE program packs a punch
Italian high schools have reported success with a South Australian program to help victims of bullying and aggression. (2020-08-03)
Brain cell types identified that may push males to fight and have sex
Two groups of nerve cells may serve as ''on-off switches'' for male mating and aggression, suggests a new study in rodents. (2020-07-27)
Group genomics drive aggression in honey bees
Researchers often study the genomes of individual organisms to try to tease out the relationship between genes and behavior. (2020-07-06)
York study: European ancestry plays role in 'killer' honey bees' aggressiveness
What causes African hybrid honey bees (AHB) or killer bees to be highly defensive and aggressive? (2020-07-05)
Tiny brains, big surprise: Eavesdropping wasps gain insights about fighting abilities of potential rivals
Paper wasps eavesdrop on fighting rivals to rapidly assess potential opponents without personal risk. (2020-06-25)
Medicinal cannabis may reduce behavioral problems in kids with intellectual disabilities
Cannabidiol, a type of medicinal cannabis, may reduce severe behavioural problems in children and adolescents with an intellectual disability a new study has found. (2020-06-24)
What does the "love hormone" do? It's complicated
Much of what we know about the actions of neuromodulators like oxytocin comes from behavioral studies of lab animals in standard lab conditions. (2020-06-21)
Fighting fish synchronize their combat moves and their gene expression
When two betta fish are fighting for dominance, not only do their attacks mirror each other, but the gene expression in their brain cells also starts to align. (2020-06-17)
Bees? Please. These plants are putting ants to work
This is the first plant species in the world found to have adapted traits that enables a mutually beneficial relationship with ants. (2020-06-10)
Twitter fight: Birds use social networks to pick opponents wisely
In a new article published in the journal Current Opinion in Psychology, UC biologist Elizabeth Hobson says animals such as monk parakeets seem to understand where they fit in a dominance hierarchy and pick their fights accordingly. (2020-06-09)
Pinker flamingos more aggressive
Bright pink flamingos are more aggressive than paler rivals when fighting over food, new research shows. (2020-06-07)
How experiencing traumatic stress leads to aggression
Traumatic stress can cause aggression by strengthening two brain pathways involved in emotion, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-05-18)
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. (2020-05-13)
New insights into how genes control courtship and aggression
Fruit flies, like many animals, engage in a variety of courtship and fighting behaviors. (2020-04-28)
Tailoring treatment for triple-negative breast cancer
Triple-negative breast cancer is a particularly aggressive form of the disease with no specific treatment. (2020-04-13)
Emotional abuse, neglect affect adolescent depression differently by gender, ethnicity
Research shows that physical and sexual abuse are risk factors for depression in adolescents. (2020-03-31)
Birds exposed to PCBs as nestlings show behavior changes as adults
According to a new study, Zebra Finches exposed to low levels of environmental PCBs as nestlings show changes in breeding behavior as adults. (2020-03-26)
Two hormones drive anemonefish fathering, aggression
Two brain-signaling molecules control how anemonefish dads care for their young and respond to nest intruders, researchers report in a new study. (2020-03-16)
Zoology: Western gorillas may be territorial
Groups of western gorillas may defend the centres of their home ranges against neighbouring groups, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. (2020-03-12)
Animal behavior: Anxieties and problematic behaviors may be common in pet dogs
Anxieties and behavior problems may be common across dog breeds, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-03-05)
Reducing problem behaviors for children with autism
Self-inflicted injury, aggression toward others and yelling are common problem behaviors associated with young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. (2020-03-04)
There's a better way to think about being kept waiting at work
Generally, abstract thinking leads to better outcomes, such as more creativity, wider vision and feeling more powerful. (2020-02-24)
A study of economic compensation for victims of sexual violence in Europe
A study carried out by researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) analyzes the efficiency of the Spanish system of economically compensating the victims of sexual violence. (2020-02-24)
Paying attention to complaints can protect nurses from violence
New UBC research shows, for the first time, a clear link between patient complaints and violence towards nurses. (2020-02-20)
How ants get angry: Precise 'lock and key' process regulates aggression, acceptance
In a new study, scientists at Vanderbilt report definitive evidence of a mechanism within ants that is responsible for unlocking aggression. (2020-02-03)
Moongoose females compete over reproduction
A new study on wild banded mongooses reveals that females may use spontaneous abortion to cope with reproductive competition, and to save their energy for future breeding attempts in better conditions. (2019-12-13)
What is a scream? The acoustics of a primal human call
Listeners show strong agreement for parameters of a scream, including a higher pitch, roughness and a higher peak frequency. (2019-12-05)
Fighting fruit flies: Aggressive behavior influenced by previous interactions
Aggression doesn't just depend on who you are or who you're interacting with but also depends on your previous interactions, a new University of Guelph fruit fly study has found. (2019-11-27)
Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish
Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows. (2019-11-20)
Whether direct or indirect, parental alienation harms families
In one particular form of family violence, a parent tries to damage a child's relationship with the other parent. (2019-11-04)
New species take longer to arise in the Amazon
Amazonia is home to the greatest number of species on earth, many now threatened, but a new study published Oct. (2019-10-22)
Pitt study: Sexual selection alone could spark formation of new species
Because of imprinted preferences, strawberry poison frog females mate more with similar colored males, and less with differently colored males. (2019-10-17)
Male and female mice have different brain cells
Scientists discover that a brain region known to control sex and violence contains rare cell types that differ in male versus female mice. (2019-10-17)
Aggressive and agitated behaviors in dementia are better treated without medications
Nonpharmacologic treatments, such as massage and touch therapy, seemed to be more effective than pharmacologic treatments for reducing aggression and agitation in adults with dementia. (2019-10-14)
Non-pharmacologic treatments may be more effective for psychiatric symptoms of dementia
A systematic review and meta-analysis, led by St. Michael's Hospital of Unity Health Toronto and the University of Calgary, suggests outdoor activities were more clinically effective than anti-psychotic medication for treating physical aggression in patients with dementia. (2019-10-14)
Genes play a role in dog breed differences in behavior
Border collies are highly trainable, greyhounds love to chase, and German shepherds make good guard dogs. (2019-10-08)
Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs
By rearing frogs with parents -- or foster parents -- of different colors, a team from the University of Pittsburgh working at the Smithsonian in Panama discovered that behavior in response to color may be more important than genetics in the evolution of new species. (2019-10-03)
Fish fathers exhibit signatures of 'baby brain' that may facilitate parental care behavior
Many new parents are familiar with terms like 'baby brain' or 'mommy brain' that hint at an unavoidable decline in cognitive function associated with the hormonal changes of pregnancy, childbirth, and maternal caregiving. (2019-09-30)
The problem with promoting 'responsible dog ownership'
Dog welfare campaigns that tell people to be 'responsible owners' don't help to promote behaviour change, a new University of Liverpool report suggests. (2019-09-24)
For lemurs, sex role reversal may get its start in the womb
In lemur society, it's not males but the females who are in charge. (2019-09-16)
Page 1 of 25 | 968 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Processing The Pandemic
Between the pandemic and America's reckoning with racism and police brutality, many of us are anxious, angry, and depressed. This hour, TED Fellow and writer Laurel Braitman helps us process it all.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#568 Poker Face Psychology
Anyone who's seen pop culture depictions of poker might think statistics and math is the only way to get ahead. But no, there's psychology too. Author Maria Konnikova took her Ph.D. in psychology to the poker table, and turned out to be good. So good, she went pro in poker, and learned all about her own biases on the way. We're talking about her new book "The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Invisible Allies
As scientists have been scrambling to find new and better ways to treat covid-19, they've come across some unexpected allies. Invisible and primordial, these protectors have been with us all along. And they just might help us to better weather this viral storm. To kick things off, we travel through time from a homeless shelter to a military hospital, pondering the pandemic-fighting power of the sun. And then, we dive deep into the periodic table to look at how a simple element might actually be a microbe's biggest foe. This episode was reported by Simon Adler and Molly Webster, and produced by Annie McEwen and Pat Walters. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.