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Current Agricultural News and Events

Current Agricultural News and Events, Agricultural News Articles.
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Post-Soviet food system changes led to greenhouse gas reductions
Changes in agriculture, trade, food production and consumption after the collapse of the Soviet Union led to a large reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, a new study has found. (2019-06-20)
Bees required to create an excellent blueberry crop
Getting an excellent rabbiteye blueberry harvest requires helpful pollinators -- particularly native southeastern blueberry bees -- although growers can bring in managed honey bees to do the job, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. (2019-06-17)
Biting backfire: Some mosquitoes actually benefit from pesticide application
The common perception that pesticides reduce or eliminate target insect species may not always hold. (2019-06-17)
Scientists investigate climate and vegetation drivers of terrestrial carbon fluxes
A better understanding of terrestrial flux dynamics will come from elucidating the integrated effects of climate and vegetation constraints on gross primary productivity, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem productivity. (2019-06-14)
Snack peppers find acceptance with reduced seed count
Small/miniature sweet and hot peppers, such as snack peppers, are a rapidly growing class of specialty peppers. (2019-06-14)
Community knowledge can be as valuable as ecological knowledge in environmental decision-making
An understanding of community issues can be as valuable as knowing the ecology of an area when making environmental decisions, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School. (2019-06-12)
Do we judge chocolate by its wrapper?
Packaging is the first impression consumers have of food products that influences the likelihood of purchasing. (2019-06-06)
USA lags behind EU, Brazil and China in banning harmful pesticides
Many pesticides that have been banned or are being phased out in the EU, Brazil and China, are still widely used in the USA, according to a study published in the open access journal Environmental Health. (2019-06-06)
Working landscapes can support diverse bird species
Privately-owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (2019-06-05)
Grassland areas should be chosen wisely
According to researchers from the Department of Agroecology at Aarhus University, choosing the best areas to convert from cereals to grasslands depends on whether you prioritize improvement of nature and the aquatic environment, how much biomass you can produce, or how much land is needed to so do -- or a combination. (2019-06-03)
Organic animal farms benefit birds nesting in agricultural environments
Environmental subsidies for agriculture awarded by the European Union aim to improve biodiversity in agricultural environments. (2019-05-16)
Stoic, resourceful -- and at risk for suicide
A new study led by a University of Georgia researcher, in collaboration with epidemiologists from the Georgia Department of Public Health, has identified some common factors associated with farmer suicide that may help health providers develop strategies to reduce suicide risk. (2019-05-15)
Producing food whilst preserving biodiversity
In nature conservation and agriculture, there are two opposing views of how to combine high biodiversity and sustainable food production: nature conservation should either be integrated into agricultural land, or segregated into protected areas in order to enable maximum yields in the food production areas. (2019-05-14)
Tomato pan-genome makes bringing flavor back easier
Store-bought tomatoes don't have much flavor. Now, scientists from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) may have spotlighted the solution by developing the tomato pan-genome, mapping almost 5,000 previously undocumented genes, including genes for flavor. (2019-05-13)
New research accurately predicts Australian wheat yield months before harvest
Topping the list of Australia's major crops, wheat is grown on more than half the country's cropland and is a key export commodity. (2019-05-13)
Chronic kidney disease epidemic may be result of high heat, toxins
A mysterious epidemic of chronic kidney disease among agricultural workers and manual laborers may be caused by a combination of increasingly hot temperatures, toxins and infections, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2019-05-08)
Essential tool for precision farming: new method for photochemical reflectance index measurement
Precision farming, which relies on spatially heterogeneous application of fertilizers, biologically active compounds, pesticides, etc., is one of the leading trends in modern agricultural science. (2019-05-07)
Field experiment finds a simple change that could boost agricultural productivity by 60%
Acknowledging 75% of the crop to tenants in crop-sharing contracts, instead of the customary 50%, can boost agricultural productivity and income levels in developing countries. (2019-05-02)
Why can't we all get along (like Namibia's pastoralists and wildlife?)
Scientists interviewed pastoralists in Namibia's Namib Desert to see how they felt about conflicts with wildlife, which can include lions and cheetahs preying on livestock and elephants and zebras eating crops. (2019-05-02)
How could a changing climate affect human fertility?
Human adaptation to climate change may include changes in fertility, according to a new study by an international group of researchers. (2019-05-02)
Peanut genome sequenced with unprecedented accuracy
Improved pest resistance and drought tolerance are among potential benefits of an international effort in which Agricultural Research Service and collaborating scientists have produced the clearest picture yet of the complex genomic history of the cultivated peanut. (2019-05-01)
'Right' cover-crop mix good for both Chesapeake and bottom lines
Planting and growing a strategic mix of cover crops not only reduces the loss of nitrogen from farm fields, protecting water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, but the practice also contributes nitrogen to subsequent cash crops, improving yields, according to researchers. (2019-04-29)
Plant signals trigger remarkable bacterial transformation
Cycad plant roots release signals into the soil that triggers the transformation of bacteria into its motile form, helping them move to the plant roots and establish a symbiotic partnership. (2019-04-23)
Could computer games help farmers adapt to climate change?
Researchers from Sweden and Finland have developed the interactive web-based Maladaptation Game, which can be used to better understand how Nordic farmers make decisions regarding environmental changes and how they negotiate the negative impacts of potentially damaging decisions. (2019-04-18)
Weak honey bee colonies may fail from cold exposure during shipping
Weak honey bee colonies may fail after being exposed to cold temperature changes that happen during truck shipping. (2019-04-18)
Female farmers and extension workers should lead in reducing gender inequality in agriculture
Julien Lamontagne-Godwin, lead author of a new paper, published in the Journal of Agricultural Education and Education, says a network of 'trained and knowledge-rich female lead 'contact'' farmers' could be trialled to understand its potential role in improving the dissemination of agricultural information to women in farm households. (2019-04-16)
How much nature is lost due to higher yields?
The exploitation of farmland is being intensified with a focus to raising yields. (2019-04-10)
New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. (2019-04-08)
Air pollution caused by corn production increases mortality rate in US
A new study establishes that environmental damage caused by corn production results in 4,300 premature deaths annually in the United States, representing a monetized cost of $39 billion. (2019-04-01)
Chronic kidney disease of undetermined causes, described originally in Central America and Sri Lanka
Chronic kidney disease of undetermined causes (CKDu), initially reported among agricultural communities in Central America and Sri Lanka, is also present in India, particularly in Southern rural areas, and could be common in other tropical and subtropical rural settings. (2019-03-29)
New plant breeding technologies for food security
An international team, including researchers from the University of Göttingen, argues in a perspective article recently published in ''Science'' that new plant breeding technologies can contribute significantly to food security and sustainable development. (2019-03-29)
Researchers aim to demystify complex ag water requirements for Produce Safety Rule
In an effort to ensure the safety of fresh fruits and vegetables for consumers, Cornell University's Produce Safety Alliance is helping to explain complex federal food safety rules and develop new ways to assess agricultural water use. (2019-03-27)
Researchers advance effort to manage parasitic roundworms
Roundworms that feed on plants cause approximately $100 billion in annual global crop damage. (2019-03-27)
Stop the exploitation of migrant agricultural workers across Italy
Writing in The BMJ today, Dr Claudia Marotta and colleagues say more than 1,500 agricultural workers have died as a result of their work over the past six years, while others have been killed by the so-called 'Caporali' who are modern slave masters. (2019-03-27)
How the 'good feeling' can influence the purchase of sustainable chocolate
More and more products carry ethical labels such as fair-trade or organic, which consumers view positively. (2019-03-22)
Honey bee colonies more successful by foraging on non-crop fields
Honey bee colonies foraging on land with a strong cover of clover species and alfalfa do more than three times as well than if they are put next to crop fields of sunflowers or canola, according to a study just published in Scientific Reports by an Agricultural Research Service scientist and his colleagues. (2019-03-20)
Butterfly numbers down by two thirds
Meadows adjacent to high-intensity agricultural areas are home to less than half the number of butterfly species than areas in nature preserves. (2019-03-20)
BU: Central American kidney disease epidemic linked to occupational heat exposure
For two decades, Nicaragua and El Salvador have seen increasing mortality from an unusual form of chronic kidney disease (CKD), also called Mesoamerican Nephropathy (MeN). (2019-03-14)
Report: Despite being skilled producers, Danish farmers face poorer conditions than their European counterparts
AGRICULTURE Danish farmers are good at exploiting their productive potential, but higher production costs make it difficult for them to compete with other EU nations. (2019-03-13)
Strontium isotope maps are disturbed by agricultural lime
Strontium isotopes are frequently used in archaeological studies to establish the provenance and migration history of prehistoric people and artifacts. (2019-03-13)
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