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Current Agriculture News and Events, Agriculture News Articles.
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Ants fight plant diseases
New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. (2019-10-17)
Photosynthesis olympics: can the best wheat varieties be even better?
Scientists have put elite wheat varieties through a sort of 'Photosynthesis Olympics' to find which varieties have the best performing photosynthesis. (2019-10-17)
Tennessee researchers join call for responsible development of synthetic biology
Engineering biology is transforming technology and science. Researchers in the international Genome Project-write, including two authors from the UTIA Center for Agricultural Synthetic Biology, outline the technological advances needed to secure a safe, responsible future in the Oct. (2019-10-17)
New research to boost global date fruit production
Today on World Food Day, a team of Plant Scientists from King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) has begun a major project to improve global date palm production and protection. (2019-10-15)
New report says accelerating global agricultural productivity growth is critical
The 2019 Global Agricultural Productivity Report, released today by Virginia Tech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, shows agricultural productivity growth -- increasing output of crops and livestock with existing or fewer inputs -- is growing globally at an average annual rate of 1.63%. (2019-10-15)
Plant death may reveal genetic mechanisms underlying cell self-destruction
Hybrid plants, which produced by crossing two different types of parents, often die in conditions in which both parents would survive. (2019-10-10)
CABI scientists track wheat aphids and their natural enemies for better pest management in Pakistan
For the first time, CABI scientists have studied the distribution and population dynamics of wheat aphids and their natural enemies in Pakistan through seasons and periods of time. (2019-10-10)
How plants react to fungi
Using special receptors, plants recognize when they are at risk of fungal infection. (2019-10-07)
Nodulation connected to higher resistance against powdery mildew in legumes
Scientists have long known that nodulation is important to plant health. (2019-10-07)
Urban, home gardens could help curb food insecurity, health problems
Food deserts are an increasingly recognized problem in the United States, but a new study from the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, indicates urban and home gardens -- combined with nutrition education -- could be a path toward correcting that disadvantage. (2019-10-07)
Turning Phoenix green
A group of researchers led by Arizona State University assessed how urban agriculture can help Phoenix meet its sustainability goals. (2019-09-30)
Tractor overturn prediction using a bouncing ball model could save the lives of farmers
Overturning tractors are the leading cause of death for farmers around the world. (2019-09-25)
Scientists and key figures develop vision for managing UK land and seas after Brexit
A team of researchers, led by scientists at the University of York, consulted with key figures from the agriculture and fishing industries nationwide to produce a framework for managing land and seas after the UK has left the EU. (2019-09-24)
Inequality: What we've learned from the 'Robots of the late Neolithic'
Seven thousand years ago, societies across Eurasia began to show signs of lasting divisions between haves and have-nots. (2019-09-18)
Researchers develop chemical reaction method for more efficient drug production
Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan and Mount Allison University in Canada have developed a more efficient method to produce the building blocks needed for antibiotics and cancer treatment drugs. (2019-09-12)
Insects as food and feed: research and innovation drive growing field
As the global food supply faces the dual challenge of climate change and a growing human population, innovative minds are turning to a novel source for potential solutions: insects. (2019-09-11)
People transformed the world through land use by 3,000 years ago
Humans started making an impact on the global ecosystem through intensive farming much earlier than previously estimated, according to a new study published in the journal Science. (2019-08-29)
A global assessment of Earth's early anthropogenic transformation
A global archaeological assessment of ancient land use reveals that prehistoric human activity had already substantially transformed the ecology of Earth by 3,000 years ago, even before intensive farming and the domestication of plants and animals. (2019-08-29)
Land-use program fosters white-tailed deer populations in USA
A land-use program piloted in the United States is having a long-term positive impact on populations of white-tailed deer, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-08-27)
How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. (2019-08-27)
Japanese trees synchronize allergic pollen release over immense distances
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) researchers used tree pollen data for 120 sites across Japan to observe pollen synchronicity at regional and national levels. (2019-08-26)
Shocking rate of plant extinctions in South Africa
Over the past 300 years, 79 plants have been confirmed extinct from three of the world's biodiversity hotspots located in South Africa -- the Cape Floristic Region, the Succulent Karoo, and the Maputuland-Pondoland-Albany corridor. (2019-08-22)
Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?
Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research led by the University of Bristol. (2019-08-16)
Compost key to sequestering carbon in the soil
For their 19-year study, UC Davis scientists dug roughly 6 feet down to compare soil carbon changes in different cropping systems. (2019-08-14)
Asian longhorned beetle larvae eat plant tissues that their parents cannot
Despite the buzz in recent years about other invasive insects that pose an even larger threat to agriculture and trees -- such as the spotted lanternfly, the stink bug and the emerald ash borer -- Penn State researchers have continued to study another damaging pest, the Asian longhorned beetle. (2019-08-12)
Installing solar panels on agricultural lands maximizes their efficiency, new study shows
A new study finds that if less than 1% of agricultural land was converted to solar panels, it would be sufficient to fulfill global electric energy demand. (2019-08-08)
New process discovered to completely degrade flame retardant in the environment
A team of environmental scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and China has for the first time used a dynamic, two-step process to completely degrade a common flame-retardant chemical, rendering the persistent global pollutant nontoxic. (2019-08-08)
Seabirds are threatened by hazardous chemicals in plastics
An international collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has found that hazardous chemicals were detected in plastics eaten by seabirds. (2019-08-02)
West Coast forest landowners will plant less Douglas-fir in warming climate, model shows
West Coast forest landowners are expected to adapt to climate change by gradually switching from Douglas-fir to other types of trees such as hardwoods and ponderosa pine. (2019-07-30)
From urine samples to precision medicine in bladder cancer through 3D cell culture
A research collaboration led by scientists from institutions in Japan including Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) has developed a new experimental cancer model for dog bladder cancer. (2019-07-30)
Gravity changes mass of muscles and bones, which was experimentally observed in space
An international collaboration led by scientists mainly at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has found that bone and muscle mass are regulated by the altered gravity. (2019-07-25)
Smart irrigation model predicts rainfall to conserve water
A predictive model combining information about plant physiology, real-time soil conditions and weather forecasts can help make more informed decisions about when and how much to irrigate. (2019-07-19)
'Intensive' beekeeping not to blame for common bee diseases
More 'intensive' beekeeping does not raise the risk of diseases that harm or kill the insects, new research suggests. (2019-07-17)
More farmers, more problems: How smallholder agriculture is threatening the western Amazon
Small-scale farmers are posing serious threats to biodiversity in northeastern Peru -- and the problem will likely only get worse. (2019-07-15)
Study: Global farming trends threaten food security
Citrus fruits, coffee and avocados: the food on our tables has become more diverse in recent decades. (2019-07-11)
The discovery of a more effective method to estimate polluting emissions from nitrogen fertilizers
The discovery of a more effective method to estimate polluting emissions from nitrogen fertilizers. (2019-07-11)
Participating in local food projects may improve mental health
A new study soon to be available in the Journal of Public Health, published by Oxford University Press, suggests that participating in local food projects may have a positive effect on psychological health. (2019-07-09)
Millet farmers adopted barley agriculture and permanently settled the Tibetan Plateau
The permanent human occupation on the Tibetan Plateau was facilitated by the introduction of cold-tolerant barley around 3600 years before present, however, how barley agriculture spread onto the Tibetan Plateau remains unknown. (2019-07-02)
Irrigated farming in Wisconsin's central sands cools the region's climate
Irrigation dropped maximum temperatures by one to three degrees Fahrenheit on average while increasing minimum temperatures up to four degrees compared to unirrigated farms or forests, new research shows In all, irrigated farms experienced a three- to seven-degree smaller range in daily temperatures compared to other land uses. (2019-07-02)
Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance
A team of researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the University of La Rochelle is now the first to have demonstrated that organic farming benefits honeybee colonies, especially when food is scarce in late spring. (2019-06-26)
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