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Current Algae News and Events

Current Algae News and Events, Algae News Articles.
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Explosion in Tianjin Port enhanced atmospheric nitrogen deposition over the Bohai Sea
In August 2015, a serious explosion occurred in Tianjin Port, leaving at least 50 dead and hundreds injured. (2019-11-13)
Something old, something new in the ocean's blue
Microbiologists at the Max Planck Institutes in Marburg and Bremen have discovered a new metabolic process in the ocean. (2019-11-13)
Engineers help with water under the bridge and other tough environmental decisions
From energy to water to food, civil engineering projects greatly impact natural resources. (2019-11-12)
NUS engineers invent smartphone device that detects harmful algae in 15 minutes
A team of engineers from the National University of Singapore has developed a highly sensitive system that uses a smartphone to rapidly detect the presence of toxin-producing algae in water within 15 minutes. (2019-11-07)
NRRI scientist sheds light on complexity of biodiversity loss
University of Minnesota Duluth Natural Resources Research Institute limnologist Chris Filstrup is the lead author on a paper published in the journal Ecology Letters this month, that suggests that species richness -- the number of different species in a given ecological community -- is not the only, nor necessarily the best, way to measure biodiversity impacts on ecosystems. (2019-11-05)
Parasite manipulates algal metabolism for its own benefit
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and the universities of Jena and Frankfurt show that a pathogenic fungus alters the metabolism of its host unicellular algae, for its own purposes: the small bioactive substances that are formed in the process benefit the fungi's own propagation while preventing the algae from proliferating. (2019-10-30)
Bacterial arsenic efflux genes enabled plants to transport boron efficiently
- Nodulin26-like-intrinsic-proteins (NIPs) are essential for the transport of silicon and boron in plants. (2019-10-30)
Red algae thrive despite ancestor's massive loss of genes
You'd think that losing 25 percent of your genes would be a big problem for survival. (2019-10-29)
Re-cracking the genetic code
Research suggests that we may have only begun to scratch the surface on the number of variations present in the genetic codes of all living organisms. (2019-10-29)
Study provides framework for 1 billion years of green plant evolution
Gene sequences for more than 1,100 plant species have been released by an international consortium of nearly 200 plant scientists, the culmination of a nine-year research project. (2019-10-23)
Nature: Scientists present new data on the evolution of plants and the origin of species
There are over 500,000 plant species in the world today. (2019-10-23)
Study provides framework for one billion years of green plant evolution
Gene sequences for more than 1100 plant species have been released by an international consortium of nearly 200 plant scientists who were involved in a nine-year research project, One Thousand Plant Transcriptomes Initiative (1KP), that examined the diversification of plant species, genes and genomes across the more than one-billion-year history of green plants dating back to the ancestors of flowering plants and green algae. (2019-10-23)
It really was the asteroid
Fossil remains of tiny calcareous algae not only provide information about the end of the dinosaurs, but also show how the oceans recovered after the fatal asteroid impact. (2019-10-21)
Galapagos study highlights importance of biodiversity in the face of climate change
Study of wave turbulence suggests that highly mobile species and more diverse ecological communities may be more resilient to the effects of changing environmental conditions. (2019-10-16)
Otherworldly worms with three sexes discovered in Mono Lake
The extreme environment of Mono Lake was thought to only house two species of animals -- until now. (2019-09-26)
Bacteria make pearl chains
For the first time, scientists in Bremen were able to observe bacteria forming pearl chains that protrude from the cell surface. (2019-09-25)
Is theory on Earth's climate in the last 15 million years wrong?
A key theory that attributes the climate evolution of the Earth to the breakdown of Himalayan rocks may not explain the cooling over the past 15 million years, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2019-09-23)
Scientists decode DNA of coral and all its microscopic supporters
Scientists have seen for the first time how corals collaborate with other microscopic life to build and grow. (2019-09-23)
For people with pre-existing liver disease, toxic algae may be more dangerous
Blooms of blue-green algae have flourished across much of the United States this year. (2019-09-19)
Hurricane Nicole sheds light on how storms impact deep ocean
2016's Hurricane Nicole had a significant effect on the ocean's carbon cycle and deep sea ecosystems, reports a team from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, and the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences. (2019-09-19)
New study measures how much of corals' nutrition comes from hunting
When it comes to feeding, corals have a few tricks up their sleeve. (2019-09-17)
Hope for coral recovery may depend on good parenting
USC scientists discover coral pass beneficial algal symbionts to offspring to help them cope with rising ocean temperatures. (2019-09-16)
Algae and bacteria team up to increase hydrogen production
A University of Cordoba research group combined algae and bacteria in order to produce biohydrogen, fuel of the future (2019-09-16)
Princeton researchers explore how a carbon-fixing organelle forms via phase separation
Algae remove vast amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis thanks to an organelle called the pyrenoid, which boosts the efficiency of carbon-fixation. (2019-09-12)
Do animals control earth's oxygen level?
For the first time, researchers have measured how the production of algae and the Earth's oxygen level affect each other -- what you might call 'Earth's heartbeat'. (2019-09-10)
Study reveals new patterns of key ocean nutrient
The important nutrient phosphate may be less abundant in the global ocean than previously thought, according to a new paper in Science Advances. (2019-09-05)
Kilauea eruption fosters algae bloom in North Pacific Ocean
USC Dornsife and University of Hawaii researchers get a rare opportunity to study the immediate impact of lava from the Kilauea volcano on the marine environment surrounding the Hawaiian islands. (2019-09-05)
Corals take control of nitrogen recycling
Corals use sugar from their symbiotic algal partners to control them by recycling nitrogen from their own ammonium waste. (2019-09-03)
Early start of 20th century arctic sea ice decline
Arctic sea-ice has decreased rapidly during the last decades in concert with substantial global surface warming. (2019-08-30)
Bacteria feeding on Arctic algae blooms can seed clouds
New research finds Arctic Ocean currents and storms are moving bacteria from ocean algae blooms into the atmosphere where the particles help clouds form. (2019-08-29)
Study finds big increase in ocean carbon dioxide absorption along West Antarctic Peninsula
Climate change is altering the ability of the Southern Ocean off the West Antarctic Peninsula to absorb carbon dioxide, according to a Rutgers-led study, and that could magnify climate change in the long run. (2019-08-26)
Paper filter from local algae could save millions of lives in Bangladesh
The problem of access to safe drinking water in most parts of Bangladesh is a persistent challenge. (2019-08-18)
Scientists discover key factors in how some algae harness solar energy
Scientists have discovered how diatoms -- a type of alga that produce 20% of the Earth's oxygen -- harness solar energy for photosynthesis. (2019-08-13)
Rapid coral death and decay, not just bleaching, as marine heatwaves intensify
When ocean temperatures rise, corals are put at risk of a phenomenon known as bleaching, in which corals expel the algae living in their tissues and turn white. (2019-08-08)
A marine microbe could play increasingly important role in regulating climate
Marine microbes with a special metabolism are ubiquitous and could play an important role in how Earth regulates climate. (2019-08-07)
The surprising merit of giant clam feces
Young giant clams get necessary symbiotic algae from the feces of their parents, updating the age-old adage: one clam's trash is another clam's treasure. (2019-08-07)
Missing link in algal photosynthesis found, offers opportunity to improve crop yields
Photosynthesis is the natural process plants and algae utilize to capture sunlight and fix carbon dioxide into energy-rich sugars that fuel growth, development, and in the case of crops, yield. (2019-08-05)
Simpler than expected: A microbial community with small diversity cleans up algal blooms
Algae blooms regularly make for pretty, swirly satellite photos of lakes and oceans. (2019-07-29)
How nature builds hydrogen-producing enzymes
A team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Oxford has discovered how hydrogen-producing enzymes, called hydrogenases, are activated during their biosynthesis. (2019-07-24)
Algae living inside fungi: How land plants first evolved
New research from Michigan State University, and published in the journal eLife, presents evidence that algae could have piggybacked on fungi to leave the water and to colonize the land, over 500 million years ago. (2019-07-23)
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