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Current Allergies News and Events

Current Allergies News and Events, Allergies News Articles.
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Spring rains are a surprising source of pollen
Spring rains washes away some pollen, but not all. University of Iowa researchers have found tree pollen fragments can remain airborne for hours after a storm. (2020-05-20)
New insight into allergies could improve diagnosis and treatment
A study led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital point to a potential marker of these conditions and a new therapeutic strategy. (2020-05-20)
A new plant-based system for the mass production of allergens for immunotherapy
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba developed a novel system for the mass production of allergens. (2020-05-10)
Nasal biomarkers predict severity of pollen-specific allergy symptoms
It is not only people with allergies, but also a subgroup of people without one that suffer in spring and have nasal problems from contact with pollen. (2020-04-29)
Got seasonal allergies? Beetles could help
Allergies caused by the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, impact millions, and in Europe alone, around 13.5 million people suffer with symptoms, resulting in 7.4 billion Euros worth of health costs per year, according to the research. (2020-04-21)
Study shows ICU patients with low-risk penicillin allergies can be tested and treated
Many patients previously diagnosed with a penicillin allergy can have their allergy label removed after testing and safely undergo treatment with penicillin medications, according to a study published in American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2020-04-02)
Study helps to identify medications which are safe to use in treatment of COVID-19
A recent study has found that there is no evidence for or against the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen for patients with COVID-19. (2020-03-30)
Interactive product labels require new regulations, study warns
Artificial intelligence will be increasingly used on labels on food and other products in the future to make them interactive, and regulations should be reformed now so they take account of new innovations, a study warns. (2020-03-26)
Children with food protein-induced enterocolitis more likely to have other allergies
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that children with a rare food allergy known as food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome, or FPIES, have a significantly higher chance of being diagnosed with other allergic conditions, including eczema, traditional food allergy and asthma. (2020-03-05)
Breastfeeding and risks of allergies and asthma
In an Acta Paediatrica study, exclusive breastfeeding for the first 3 months was linked with a lower risk of respiratory allergies and asthma when children reached 6 years of age. (2020-03-04)
Study links depressive symptoms during pregnancy with lowered immunity in infants
A woman's mental health during pregnancy has a direct influence on the development of her child's immune system, according to a new study from pediatric researchers at the University of Alberta. (2020-03-03)
Allergists encourage parents of food-allergic kids to recognize their own anxiety
Allergists in the study said thoughtful and balanced communication and having credible information to share with your child go a long way toward helping your child with fears about their food allergy. (2020-02-25)
Forty percent of people with peanut allergies can eat tree nuts but choose not to
New study showed that nearly 90% of people with peanut allergy could potentially tolerate almonds, but 33% of that group preferred strict avoidance due to fear of an allergic reaction. (2019-12-18)
Majority of children with allergies needlessly avoid common antibiotics
Eight in 10 children who reported being allergic to common classes of antibiotics used to treat respiratory, skin and intestinal infections were not truly allergic to it, a new study shows. (2019-12-17)
Children allergic to cow's milk smaller and lighter
Children allergic to cow's milk are smaller and weigh less, according to the first published study to characterize growth trajectories from early childhood to adolescence in children with persistent food allergies. (2019-12-16)
Pharmacy assessment of penicillin allergies finds safe, less-expensive options
A pharmacy-driven assessment found more than half of patients with reported penicillin allergies were able to take antibiotics from the same drug class rather than resorting to substitutes that may be more costly, have more side effects and have other downsides. (2019-12-09)
Prenatal and early life exposure to multiple air pollutants increases odds of toddler allergies
A new article in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows a significant association between multiple prenatal and early life exposures to indoor pollutants and the degree of allergic sensitivity in 2-year-olds. (2019-12-05)
Probiotic may help treat colic in infants
Probiotics -- or 'good bacteria' -- have been used to treat infant colic with varying success. (2019-12-04)
Introducing peanuts and eggs early can prevent food allergies in high risk infants
Research undertaken by King's College London and St George's, University of London has found that introducing certain foods early to infants can prevent them from developing an allergy despite low adherence to an introduction regime. (2019-12-04)
Children with food allergies seen faster under new paediatric model
Children with food allergies are seen 10 months sooner and have fewer allergic reactions when treated by a paediatrician in their own community, a new study shows. (2019-12-04)
Search for the source of antibodies would help treat allergies
Researchers of Sechenov University together with their colleagues from Russia and Austria summarised everything known about cells producing group E antibodies. (2019-11-25)
Technique identifies T cells primed for certain allergies or infections
MIT researchers can now identify T cells reactive to a particular target from a patient's cells, and to perform high-throughput single-cell RNA sequencing of those cells. (2019-11-19)
Antibody injection stops peanut allergy for 2 to 6 weeks, Stanford-led study shows
One injection of an antibody treatment let people with severe peanut allergies eat a nut's worth of peanut protein two weeks later, a small, Stanford-led pilot study showed. (2019-11-14)
Social media alternative facts on food allergies can negatively impact medical decisions
Social media misinformation has a negative impact on medical decisions made by people with food allergies. (2019-11-08)
Breaking news on oral food challenges
Two medically challenging cases being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting contain new information on the benefits of oral food challenges when diagnosing food allergies. (2019-11-08)
How prenatal diet, delivery mode and infant feeding relate to pediatric allergies
Two new studies being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting contain new information on how prenatal diet, the way the baby is delivered, and infant feeding practices can affect the risk of allergy. (2019-11-08)
Breaking news on penicillin allergy
Three new studies being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting in Houston present new information on penicillin allergy. (2019-11-08)
Allergy patients equally satisfied with telemedicine and in-person appointments
A new study being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting in Houston showed most parents of pediatric patients were more or equally satisfied with the treatment their children received during telemedicine visits for allergies and asthma. (2019-11-08)
Allergy shots may be an effective treatment for pediatric pollen food allergy syndrome
A new study being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting in Houston shows allergy shots (subcutaneous immunotherapy) can be effective in reducing PFAS symptoms for pediatric patients. (2019-11-08)
NIH researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children have sesame allergy
Investigators at the National Institutes of Health have found that sesame allergy is common among children with other food allergies, occurring in an estimated 17% of this population. (2019-11-04)
Scientists find molecular key to body making healthy T cells
In a finding that could help lead to new therapies for immune diseases like multiple sclerosis and IBD, scientists report in the Journal of Experimental Medicine identifying a gene and family of proteins critical to the formation of mature and fully functioning T cells in the immune system. (2019-10-25)
Heavier birth weight linked to childhood allergies
New research shows that the more a baby weighs at birth relative to its gestational age the higher the risk they will suffer from childhood food allergy or eczema, although not hay fever. (2019-10-15)
Severe allergic reactions identified with peripherally inserted central catheters
Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) that use a magnetized tip to guide insertion were associated with serious allergic reactions in patients, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-10-08)
Prolonged antibiotic treatment may alter preterm infants' microbiome
Treating preterm infants with antibiotics for more than 20 months appears to promote the development of multidrug-resistant gut bacteria, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2019-09-09)
Metal particles abraded from tattooing needles travel inside the body
Allergic reactions are common side effects of tattoos and pigments have been blamed for this. (2019-08-26)
Sesame allergy is more common than previously known
Sesame allergy affects more than 1 million children and adults in the US, more than previously known, reports a new study. (2019-08-02)
Scientists discover immune cell subtype in mice that drives allergic reactions
Allergies can be life-threatening when they cause anaphylaxis, an extreme reaction with constriction of the airways and a sudden drop in blood pressure. (2019-08-01)
Keeping livestock in the yard just might help your baby's immune system
Getting up close -- and a little dirty -- with farm animals just might help us fend off illness, say researchers who've further demonstrated the benefits of early exposure to a wide variety of environmental bacteria. (2019-07-23)
Early introduction of peanuts in babies to reduce allergy risk
Worried about peanut allergies in children? A practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) outlines five things to know about early introduction of peanuts in infants to reduce the risk of peanut allergy. (2019-07-22)
Allergy, asthma risk are increased by microbial compound found in infant gut
A study of newborn infants has identified a compound produced by gut bacteria that appears to predispose certain infants to allergies and asthma later in life. (2019-07-22)
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