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Current Amazon basin News and Events

Current Amazon basin News and Events, Amazon basin News Articles.
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Clues on how soils may respond to climate change found
Rock core samples from a period of warming millions of years ago indicate soils contributed to a rapid rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas and suggest modern climate models may overestimate Earth's ability to mitigate future warming, according to an international team of scientists. (2019-07-24)
New map outlines seismic faults across DFW region
Scientists from SMU, The University of Texas at Austin and Stanford University found that the majority of faults underlying the Fort Worth Basin are as sensitive to forces that could cause them to slip as those that have hosted earthquakes in the past. (2019-07-23)
Many Dallas-Fort Worth area faults have the potential to host earthquakes, new study finds
A study led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that the majority of faults underlying the Fort Worth Basin are as sensitive to changes in stress that could cause them to slip as those that have generated earthquakes in recent years. (2019-07-23)
Sustainable land management key to reducing Amazon wildfires, study shows
The unrelenting deforestation of the Amazon region could lead to a dramatic increase to the risk of destructive wildfire outbreaks, research has shown. (2019-07-19)
Stone tool changes may show how Mesolithic hunter-gatherers responded to changing climate
The development of new hunting projectiles by European hunter-gatherers during the Mesolithic may have been linked to territoriality in a rapidly-changing climate, according to a study published July 17, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Philippe Crombé from Ghent University, Belgium. (2019-07-17)
Protecting a forgotten treasure trove of biodiversity
The lesser-known Cerrado biome in Brazil is a hotspot of biodiversity, but it is being destroyed at an alarming rate by unsustainable agricultural activities. (2019-07-17)
More farmers, more problems: How smallholder agriculture is threatening the western Amazon
Small-scale farmers are posing serious threats to biodiversity in northeastern Peru -- and the problem will likely only get worse. (2019-07-15)
New analysis reveals challenges for drought management in Oregon's Willamette River Basin
In Oregon's fertile Willamette River Basin, where two-thirds of the state's population lives, managing water scarcity would be more effective if conservation measures were introduced in advance and upstream from the locations where droughts are likely to cause shortages. (2019-07-15)
Satellite data reveals largest-ever macroalgae bloom
Scientists have used satellite observations to identify the largest bloom of macroalgae in the world, the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt -- a heavy mass of brown algae stretching from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico. (2019-07-04)
Scientists discover the biggest seaweed bloom in the world
The record-breaking belt of brown algae stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico -- and it's likely here to stay, says a team led by the USF College of Marine Science (2019-07-04)
Using artificial intelligence to better predict severe weather
When forecasting weather, meteorologists use a number of models and data sources to track shapes and movements of clouds that could indicate severe storms. (2019-07-02)
Trees for water quality credits
In a new study, UC Santa Barbara Bren School professor Arturo Keller links reforestation to water quality credits. (2019-06-27)
Conservation efforts for giant south american river turtles have protected 147,000 females
By analyzing records in countries of the Amazon and Orinoco basins--which include Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador -- a paper published today in Oryx -- The International Journal of Conservation, categorized 85 past and present initiatives or projects that work to preserve the South American River Turtle, or charapa (Podocnemis expansa), a critically endangered species. (2019-06-25)
Roads and deforestation explode in the Congo basin
Logging roads are expanding dramatically in the Congo Basin, leading to catastrophic collapses in animal populations living in the world's second-largest rainforest, according to research co-led by a scientist at James Cook University in Australia. (2019-06-24)
Big data says food is too sweet
New research from the Monell Center analyzed nearly 400,000 food reviews posted by Amazon customers to gain real-world insight into the food choices that people make. (2019-06-24)
Tropical soil disturbance could be hidden source of CO2
Florida State researchers working in the Democratic Republic of the Congo found a link between the churning of deep soils during deforestation and the release of carbon dioxide through streams and rivers. (2019-06-24)
Researchers identify genes linked to sex differentiation in giant Amazon fish
Discoveries by Brazilian and German researchers may facilitate early sexing of pirarucu (arapaima) and its reproduction in captivity while also paving the way for genetic improvement. (2019-06-24)
Climate change had significant impact on Amazon communities before arrival of Europeans
Climate change had a significant impact on people living in the Amazon rainforest before the arrival of Europeans and the loss of many indigenous groups, a new study shows. (2019-06-17)
Past climate change: A warning for the future?
A new study of climate changes and their effects on past societies offers a sobering glimpse of social upheavals that might happen in the future. (2019-06-17)
Catalog of north Texas earthquakes confirms continuing effects of wastewater disposal
A comprehensive catalog of earthquake sequences in Texas's Fort Worth Basin, from 2008 to 2018, provides a closer look at how wastewater disposal from oil and gas exploration has changed the seismic landscape in the basin. (2019-06-11)
Last-ditch attempt to warn of coalmine harm
Groundwater experts from around Australia have repeated calls for further investigations into the potential effects on heritage groundwater reserves in central Queensland if the giant Adani Carmichael coalmine gets the final regulatory go-ahead this week. (2019-06-10)
Mass anomaly detected under the moon's largest crater
A mysterious large mass of material has been discovered beneath the largest crater in our solar system -- the Moon's South Pole-Aitken basin -- and may contain metal from the asteroid that crashed into the Moon and formed the crater, according to a Baylor University study. (2019-06-10)
Snow monitoring at the Sierra Nevada peaks offer the first medium-term data sets
A research group at the University of Cordoba published 14 years of weather monitoring in the Sierra Nevada along with photographs of snow distribution. (2019-06-10)
Study provides new insight into origin of Canadian Rockies
The Canadian Rocky Mountains were formed when the North American continent was dragged westward during the closure of an ocean basin off the west coast and collided with a microcontinent over 100 million years ago, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists. (2019-06-06)
Understanding Amazonia's mysterious ocelots
Researchers conducted a 12-year study from 2010 to 2017 on ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in the Brazilian Amazon, deploying 899 camera traps at 12 stations to determine habitat preferences, which were largely unknown. (2019-06-06)
Details of first historically recorded plague pandemic revealed by ancient genomes
An international team of researchers has analyzed human remains from 21 archaeological sites to learn more about the impact and evolution of the plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis during the first plague pandemic (541-750 AD). (2019-06-05)
Freshwater stingray venom varies according to sex and age
A study by the FAPESP-funded Research, Innovation and Dissemination Center shows that toxins produced by young female stingrays cause more pain, whereas toxins produced by adult stingrays cause tissue necrosis. (2019-06-05)
Combination of water scarcity and inflexible demand puts world's river basins at risk
Nearly one-fifth of the world's population lives in a stressed water basin where the next climate change-driven incident could threaten access to an essential resource for agriculture, industry and life itself, according to a paper by University of California, Irvine researchers and others, published today in Nature Sustainability. (2019-06-03)
Urban pollution enhances up to 400% formation of aerosols over the Amazon rainforest
This phenomenon affects cloud production and rainfall, with consequences for the local and global climate, which researchers have warned about in the study published in Nature Communications. (2019-06-03)
Study of northern Alaska could rewrite Arctic history
New research on the North Slope of Alaska could help revise predictions about the Arctic's oil, gas and mineral wealth. (2019-05-28)
Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests
A meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies of soil biodiversity in Amazonian forests found that the abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of soil fauna and microbes were reduced following deforestation. (2019-05-24)
Hot spots in rivers that nurture salmon 'flicker on and off' in Bristol Bay region
Chemical signatures imprinted on tiny stones that form inside the ears of fish show that two of Alaska's most productive salmon populations, and the fisheries they support, depend on the entire watershed. (2019-05-23)
On Mars, sands shift to a different drum
In the most detailed analysis of how sands move around on Mars, a team of planetary scientists led by the UA found that processes not involved in controlling sand movement on Earth play major roles on Mars. (2019-05-23)
Subtropical Storm Andrea gone girl
Subtropical Storm Andrea was gone before the storm could even reach Tropical Storm status. (2019-05-22)
The cultural significance of carbon-storing peatlands to rural communities
A group of UK and Peruvian researchers have carried out the first detailed study of how rural communities interact with peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon, a landscape that is one of the world's largest stores of carbon. (2019-05-21)
Algal blooms in Lake Erie's central basin could produce neurotoxins
Harmful algal blooms pose a unique toxic threat in Lake Erie's central basin, new research has found. (2019-05-16)
China's Chang'E 4 mission discovers new 'secrets' from far side of the moon
A lunar lander named for the Chinese goddess of the moon may have lessened the mystery of the far side of the moon. (2019-05-15)
Ancient fish ponds in the Bolivian savanna supported human settlement
A network of fish ponds supported a permanent human settlement in the seasonal drylands of Bolivia more than one thousand years ago, according to a new study published May 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Gabriela Prestes-Carneiro of Federal University of Western Para, Brazil, and colleagues. (2019-05-15)
People more likely to trust machines than humans with their private information
Not everyone fears our machine overlords. In fact, according to Penn State researchers, when it comes to private information and access to financial data, people tend to trust machines more than people, which could lead to both positive and negative online behaviors. (2019-05-10)
New study in Nature: Just one-third of the world's longest rivers remain free-flowing
Infrastructure development and other man-made changes have already fragmented or disrupted two-thirds of Earth's longest rivers. (2019-05-08)
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