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Current Amazon basin News and Events

Current Amazon basin News and Events, Amazon basin News Articles.
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AI management can benefit the growing online workforce
USC research shows that gig workers and others in the new crowdwork economy need more autonomy and clear purpose in online tasks to perform at a high level -- advantages that AI assistance offers. (2020-05-26)
Low-severity fires enhance long-term carbon retention of peatlands
High-intensity fires can destroy marshy peatlands and cause them to emit huge amounts of their stored carbon into the atmosphere as greenhouse gases, but a new Duke University study finds low-severity fires spark the opposite outcome. (2020-05-21)
Fire aerosols decrease global terrestrial ecosystem productivity through changing climate
Cooling, drying, and light attenuation are major impacts of fire aerosols on the global terrestrial ecosystem productivity. (2020-05-20)
An open-access tool to accelerate drug discovery
The Chemical Checker provides processed, harmonized and ready-to-use bioactivity information on more than 1M small molecules. (2020-05-19)
But it's a dry heat: Climate change and the aridification of North America
Discussions of drought often center on the lack of precipitation. (2020-05-19)
Early humans in China innovated technology to adapt to climate change 1-million years ago
Yang and colleagues examined archaeological evidence and showed the flexibility of early hominins to ecosystem changes 1.1-1.0 million years ago. (2020-05-13)
El Niño-linked decreases in soil moisture could trigger massive tropical-plant die offs
New research has found that El Niño events are often associated with droughts in some of the world's more vulnerable tropical regions. (2020-05-11)
Study shows wetter climate is likely to intensify global warming
New study indicates the increase in rainfall forecast by global climate models is likely to hasten the release of carbon dioxide from tropical soils, further intensifying global warming by adding to human emissions of this greenhouse gas into Earth's atmosphere. (2020-05-06)
Demographic expansion of several Amazonian archaeological cultures by computer simulation
Expansions by groups of humans were common during prehistoric times, after the adoption of agriculture. (2020-05-05)
A hydrological model leads to advances in the creation of a world water map
The University of Cordoba participated in the first shaping of a hydrological model on a basin scale as a global model to advance in world hydrological predictions. (2020-05-05)
Poor Amazonians go hungry despite living in one of the most biodiverse places on Earth
A team of scientists from Brazil and the UK are publishing the results of the first study linking food security for wildlife-dependent people in the Amazon with 'catch rates' -- which is the amount of fish caught for each hour spent fishing. (2020-04-27)
Erosion process studies in the Volga Region assist in land use planning
Dr. Gusarov (Paleoclimatology, Paleoecology and Paleomagnetism Lab) has been working on erosion processes for two decades as a part of various teams. (2020-04-27)
Anxious about public speaking? Your smart speaker could help
A team of researchers at Penn State has developed a public-speaking tutor on the Amazon Alexa platform. (2020-04-25)
Do privacy controls lead to more trust in Alexa? Not necessarily, research finds
Giving users of smart assistants the option to adjust settings for privacy or content delivery, or both, doesn't necessarily increase their trust in the platform, according to a team of Penn State researchers. (2020-04-25)
Underprotected marine protected areas in a global biodiversity hotspot
Through the assessment of the 1,062 MPAs in the Mediterranean Sea, covering 6% of the Mediterranean Basin, a research team has shown that 95% of the total area protected lacks regulations to reduce human impacts on biodiversity. (2020-04-24)
Seismic map of North America reveals geologic clues, earthquake hazards
A new stress map that reveals the forces acting on the planet's crust will contribute to safer energy exploration, updated seismic hazard maps and improved knowledge about the Earth. (2020-04-23)
European satellite data shows extreme methane emissions from Permian oil & gas operations
Study shows twice the average emissions rate of 11 other major US production regions; paper demonstrates potential for space-based data to drive down methane loss rates. (2020-04-22)
New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents. (2020-04-21)
Changes in snowmelt threaten farmers in western US
Farmers in parts of the western United States who rely on snowmelt to help irrigate their crops will be among the hardest hit in the world by climate change, a new study reveals. (2020-04-20)
3D models of mountain lakes with a portable sonar and airborne laser
The information of the territory provided by the laser technology from an airplane can be combined with data collected in mountain lakes with an inflatable boat and a small echo sounder to obtain three-dimensional maps. (2020-04-17)
Discovery of second primate lineage that crossed the Atlantic to settle in the New World
Analyses of four fossilized molars newly excavated along the left bank of the Yuruá River in the Peruvian Amazon suggest another primate lineage distinct from the Platyrrhini -- until now considered to be the only primate group ever to inhabit the New World -- also occupied the New World for a brief period of time. (2020-04-09)
Ancient teeth from Peru hint now-extinct monkeys crossed Atlantic from Africa
Four fossilized monkey teeth discovered deep in the Peruvian Amazon provide new evidence that more than one group of ancient primates journeyed across the Atlantic Ocean from Africa. (2020-04-09)
Streaming services flouting India's regulations banning tobacco imagery in all media
Streaming services that are popular with teens and young people in India are flouting the nation's regulations on exposure to tobacco imagery in any media platform, reveals an analysis of 10 on-demand streaming series, published online in the journal Tobacco Control. (2020-04-09)
Earliest humans in the Amazon created thousands of 'forest islands' as they tamed wild plants
The earliest human inhabitants of the Amazon created thousands of artificial forest islands as they tamed wild plants to grow food, a new study shows. (2020-04-08)
Lacustrine ecosystems needed 10 million years to recover after end-permian mass extinction
A research team led by Prof. WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) found that both lake and peat-forming forest ecosystems probably took as long as 10 million years to recover after the end-Permian mass extinction. (2020-04-03)
Quantitative reconstruction of formation paleo-pressure and case studies
As the paleo-pressure is significant for hydrocarbon accumulation and reservoir formation, geologists are eager for an accurate reconstruction of paleo-pressure, although that is very hard. (2020-04-01)
In Earth's largest extinction, land animal die-offs began long before marine extinction
Because of poor dates for land fossils laid down before and after the mass extinction at the end of the Permian, paleontologists assumed that the terrestrial extinctions from Gondwana occurred at the same time as the better-documented marine extinctions. (2020-03-27)
New 3D view of methane tracks sources
NASA's new 3-dimensional portrait of methane concentrations shows the world's second largest contributor to greenhouse warming. (2020-03-23)
Smaller tropical forest fragments vanish faster than larger forest blocks
In one of the first studies to explicitly account for fragmentation in tropical forests, researchers report that smaller fragments of old-growth forests and protected areas experienced greater losses than larger fragments, between 2001 and 2018. (2020-03-11)
Grainger engineers voice localization techniques for smart speakers
Smart speakers offer a variety of capabilities to help free up both our time and our hands. (2020-03-11)
Planet's largest ecosystems collapse faster than previously forecast
New research has shown that large ecosystems such as rainforests and coral reefs can collapse at a significantly faster rate than previously understood. (2020-03-10)
Amazon rainforest could be gone within a lifetime
Writing in Nature Communications, researchers from Bangor University, Southampton University and The School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London, reveal the speed at which ecosystems of different sizes will disappear, once they have reached a point beyond which they collapse -- transforming into an alternative ecosystem. (2020-03-10)
Show me the methane
Though not as prevalent in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, methane is a far more potent greenhouse gas. (2020-03-09)
Tax incentives for businesses could contribute to the decline of the middle class
Economic development incentives may do more harm than good, especially for middle-class workers, according to new West Virginia University research. (2020-03-09)
Tropical forests' carbon sink is already rapidly weakening
The ability of the world's tropical forests to remove carbon from the atmosphere is decreasing, according to a study tracking 300,000 trees over 30 years, published today in Nature. (2020-03-04)
New tiny 44 million year old bird fossil links Africa and Asia to Utah
A new species of quail-sized fossil bird from 44 million year old sediments in Utah fills in a gap in the fossil record of the early extinct relatives of chickens and turkeys, and it shows strong links with other extinct species from Namibia in Southern Africa and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. (2020-03-03)
UCLA engineers develop miniaturized 'warehouse robots' for biotechnology applications
UCLA engineers have developed minuscule warehouse logistics robots that could help expedite and automate medical diagnostic technologies and other applications that move and manipulate tiny drops of fluid. (2020-02-26)
Small farmers sink or swim in globalization's tsunami
From a synthesis of 12 cases, researchers found when smallholder farmers are connected to faraway systems, the key is to empower them to higher agency and more livelihood opportunities. (2020-02-25)
Colorado river flow dwindles due to loss of reflective snowpack
Due to the disappearance of its sunlight-reflecting seasonal snowpack, the Colorado River Basin is losing more water to evaporation than can be replaced by precipitation, researchers report. (2020-02-20)
Water reuse could be key for future of hydraulic fracturing
Enough water will come from the ground as a byproduct of oil production from unconventional reservoirs during the coming decades to theoretically counter the need to use fresh water for hydraulic fracturing operations in many of the nation's large oil-producing areas. (2020-02-20)
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