Current American chemical society News and Events

Current American chemical society News and Events, American chemical society News Articles.
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Self-repairing gelatin-based film could be a smart move for electronics
Dropping a cell phone can sometimes cause superficial cracks to appear. But other times, the device can stop working altogether because fractures develop in the material that stores data. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Polymer Materials have made an environmentally friendly, gelatin-based film that can repair itself multiple times and still maintain the electronic signals needed to access a device's data. The material could be used someday in smart electronics and health-monitoring devices. (2020-12-02)

Plant-inspired alkaloids protect rice, kiwi and citrus from harmful bacteria
Plants get bacterial infections, just as humans do. When food crops and trees are infected, their yield and quality can suffer. Although some compounds have been developed to protect plants, few of them work on a wide variety of crops, and bacteria are developing resistance. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have modified natural plant alkaloids into new compounds that kill bacteria responsible for diseases in rice, kiwi and citrus. (2020-12-02)

Ozone breaks down THC deposited on surfaces from thirdhand cannabis smoke
Second- and thirdhand tobacco smoke have received lots of attention, but much less is known about the compounds deposited on surfaces from cannabis smoke. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have discovered that ozone --a component of outdoor and indoor air -- can react with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of cannabis, on glass or cotton surfaces to produce new compounds, which they characterized for the first time. (2020-12-02)

New procedure will reduce the need for rare metals in chemical synthesis
Researchers from Kanazawa University performed an important type of tertiary alkylative cross-coupling reaction without using a rare-metal catalyst. Such efforts are needed to improve the long-term sustainability of important chemical syntheses and minimize supply chain disruptions caused by pandemics and other crises. (2020-11-27)

Patterning method could pave the way for new fiber-based devices, smart textiles
Multimaterial fibers that integrate metal, glass and semiconductors could be useful for applications such as biomedicine, smart textiles and robotics. But because the fibers are composed of the same materials along their lengths, it is difficult to position functional elements, such as electrodes or sensors, at specific locations. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a method to pattern hundreds-of-meters-long multimaterial fibers with embedded functional elements. (2020-11-25)

Helicates meet Rotaxanes to create promise for future disease treatment
A new approach to treating cancers and other diseases that uses a mechanically interlocked molecule as a 'magic bullet' has been designed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2020-11-23)

Researchers develop more efficient method to recover heavy oil
The current global supply of crude oil is expected to meet demand through 2050, but there may be a few more drops to squeeze out. By making use of a previously undesired side effect in oil recovery, researchers have developed a method that yields up to 20% more heavy oil than traditional methods. Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) team published their results on August 24 in Energy & Fuels, a journal of the American Chemical Society. (2020-11-21)

Light-controlled nanomachine controls catalysis
The vision of the future of miniaturisation has produced a series of synthetic molecular motors that are driven by a range of energy sources and can carry out various movements. A research group at FAU has now managed to control a catalysis reaction using a light-controlled motor. (2020-11-20)

Insights in the search for new antibiotics
A collaborative research team from the University of Oklahoma, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Merck & Co. published an opinion article in the journal, Nature Chemical Biology, that addresses the gap in the discovery of new antibiotics. (2020-11-19)

A more sensitive way to detect circulating tumor cells
Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, and metastasis from the breast to other areas of the body is the leading cause of death in these patients. Detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the bloodstream could help doctors find and treat metastases at an earlier stage, increasing chances of survival. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sensors have developed a method that could more sensitively detect CTCs within the complex environment of blood. (2020-11-18)

Antibiotic resistance genes in three Puerto Rican watersheds after Hurricane Maria
In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, a category 5 hurricane that made landfall in September 2017, flooding and power outages caused some wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to discharge raw sewage into waterways in Puerto Rico. Six months later, researchers monitored antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in three Puerto Rican watersheds, finding that the abundance and diversity of ARGs were highest downstream of WWTPs. They report their results in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology. (2020-11-18)

A DNA-based nanogel for targeted chemotherapy
Current chemotherapy regimens slow cancer progression and save lives, but these powerful drugs affect both healthy and cancerous cells. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have designed DNA-based nanogels that only break down and release their chemotherapeutic contents within cancer cells, minimizing the impacts on normal ones and potentially eliminating painful and uncomfortable side effects. (2020-11-18)

Green chemistry: Politecnico di Milano publishes in Chem
The prestigious journal Chem (Cell Press, impact factor: 19.735) publishes the first mechanosynthesis of a molecular crystal with a Borromean topology. The results obtained by the Politecnico di Milano group have shown that mechanosynthesis can be applied to the self-assembly of complex multi-component supramolecular structures such as the Borromean rings, demonstrating, in detail, the mechanism of formation of this complex topology. (2020-11-18)

3D-printed, lifelike heart models could help train tomorrow's surgeons (video)
Full-size, realistic models of human organs could help surgeons train and practice before they cut into a patient. However, it's been challenging to make inexpensive models of a size, complexity and material that simulates human organs. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a way to 3D print a full-size model of a patient's own heart. (2020-11-18)

Killing cancer naturally: New process to produce compounds with anti-cancer properties
Scientists from the Tokyo University of Science have made a breakthrough in the development of potential drugs that can kill cancer cells. They have discovered a method of synthesizing organic compounds that are four times more fatal to cancer cells and leave non-cancerous cells unharmed. Published in the American Chemical Society Omega, their research can assist in the creation of new anticancer drugs with minimal side effects. (2020-11-17)

Smaller than ever--exploring the unusual properties of quantum-sized materials
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) synthesize sub-nanometer particles with precisely controlled proportions of indium and tin using specific macromolecular templates called dendrimers. Through a screening process spanning different metallic ratios, they discovered unusual electronic states and optical properties originating from size-miniaturization and elemental-hybridization. Their approach could be a first step in the development of sub-nanoparticles with unique functionalities and characteristics for electronic, magnetic, and catalytic applications. (2020-11-12)

Illuminating tiny proteins in living cells using single-residue labeling tags
SciLifeLab Fellow Simon Elsässer laboratory at Karolinska Institutet reports a method, which allows fluorescent tagging of proteins with the small perturbation -- a single amino acid -- added genetically on either end of a (micro)protein of interest. The method is termed Single-residue Terminal Labeling, STELLA. (2020-11-12)

Electrochemical oxygen evolution on Hf2B2Ir5 electrode material
Electrochemical oxygen evolution on Hf2B2Ir5 electrode material. (2020-11-11)

Cloth face masks that can be disinfected by the sun
During the COVID-19 pandemic, many people have become accustomed to wearing cotton face masks in public places. However, viruses and bacteria that stick to the mask could be transferred elsewhere when the wearer removes or touches it. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed a special type of cotton face mask that kills up to 99.9999% of bacteria and viruses within 60 minutes of daylight exposure. (2020-11-11)

Compounds block stress-enhanced nicotine intake in rats
Stress is a major cause of relapse after people quit smoking. Worrying situations, such as money or relationship problems, can affect neurotransmitter levels in the brain, leading former smokers to reach for a cigarette. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science have discovered that compounds that activate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors in the brain can keep rats from self-administering increased levels of nicotine during stressful conditions in an animal model for relapse. (2020-11-11)

Silicone surface mimics topology, wettability of a real human tongue
The tongue helps people taste food, but structures on its surface also help them sense textures -- something that's also very important when savoring a meal. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a 3D silicone surface that, for the first time, closely mimics the surface features of the human tongue. The material could help food scientists study mechanical interactions of foods, liquids and medicines with the organ. (2020-11-11)

Russian scientists created a chemical space mapping method and cracked the mystery of Mendeleev number
Scientists from Skoltech puzzled out the physical meaning of the mysterious Mendeleev Numbers and suggested calculating them based on the fundamental properties of atoms. They showed that both MNs and the chemical space built around them were more effective than empirical solutions proposed until then. (2020-11-10)

Brown carbon 'tarballs' detected in Himalayan atmosphere
Some people refer to the Himalaya-Tibetan Plateau as the ''third pole'' because the region has the largest reserve of glacial snow and ice outside of the north and south poles. The glaciers, which are extremely sensitive to climate change and human influence, have been retreating over the past decade. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have detected light-absorbing ''tarballs'' in the Himalayan atmosphere, which could contribute to glacial melt. (2020-11-04)

Western diet impairs odor-related learning and olfactory memory in mice
Problems with the sense of smell appear to be an early indicator of cognitive decline in people with type 2 diabetes. However, it's unknown whether factors such as diet and obesity play a role in who develops these symptoms. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Chemical Neuroscience found that mice fed a moderate-fat, high-sugar chow (simulating a Western diet) showed a faster decline in their ability to learn and remember new odors. (2020-11-04)

Luminescent wood could light up homes of the future
The right indoor lighting can help set the mood, from a soft romantic glow to bright, stimulating colors. But some materials used for lighting, such as plastics, are not eco-friendly. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a bio-based, luminescent, water-resistant wood film that could someday be used as cover panels for lamps, displays and laser devices. (2020-11-04)

NUS researchers develop novel process that turns waste into nutritional supplements
Researchers from NUS Engineering have developed a novel conversion approach that marries chemical and biological processes to produce high-value amino acids such as L-DOPA and L-Proline from low-cost, abundant waste material like crustacean shells and sawdust. (2020-10-29)

UMass Amherst research compares sensitivity of all genes to chemical exposure
A University of Massachusetts Amherst environmental health scientist has used an unprecedented objective approach to identify which molecular mechanisms in mammals are the most sensitive to chemical exposures. (2020-10-29)

Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects of PFASs could depend on the presence of estrogen
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have received intense scrutiny in recent years because of their persistence in the environment and potential endocrine-disrupting effects. However, their estrogenic activities are controversial, with different studies showing apparently contradictory results. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have used a combination of laboratory experiments and computer modeling to reveal that PFASs can interact with the estrogen receptor in different ways to influence estrogen-controlled gene expression. (2020-10-28)

Cracking the secrets of dinosaur eggshells
Since the famous discovery of dinosaur eggs in the Gobi Desert in the early 1920s, the fossilized remains have captured the imaginations of paleontologists and the public, alike. Although dinosaur eggs have now been found on every continent, it's not always clear to scientists which species laid them. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Omega have narrowed down the list for an unknown eggshell from Mexico by comparing its microstructure and composition with four known samples. (2020-10-28)

A patch that could help heal broken hearts
According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide in recent years. During a heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), a blocked artery and the resulting oxygen deprivation cause massive cardiac cell death, blood vessel impairment and inflammation. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a cardiac patch with tiny engineered blood vessels that improved recovery from MI in rats and pigs. (2020-10-28)

Why is fertilizer used in explosives? (video)
Over the last century, the compound ammonium nitrate has been involved in at least 30 disasters and terrorist attacks. Under normal circumstances, it's totally harmless and used in things like fertilizer, so what makes ammonium nitrate turn deadly?: https://youtu.be/-SeT3N3A19c. (2020-10-22)

New method for upcycling polyethylene creates value from plastic waste
Using a unique catalyst to molecularly deconstruct polyethylene, the most commonly used form of plastic, researchers present a solvent-free way to transform it into higher-value, widely used chemical compounds. (2020-10-22)

OPD optical sensors that reproduce any color
POSTECH Professor Dae Sung Chung's team uses chemical doping to freely control the colors of organic photodiodes. (2020-10-21)

Delivering proteins to testes could someday treat male infertility
According to the Mayo Clinic, about 15% of couples are infertile, and male infertility plays a role in over one-third of these cases. Often, problems with sperm development are to blame. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have found a way to deliver a protein important for sperm cell production directly to mouse testicles, where it restored normal sperm development and allowed previously infertile mice to father pups. (2020-10-21)

A flexible color-changing film inspired by chameleon skin (video)
Chameleons can famously change their colors to camouflage themselves, communicate and regulate their temperature. Scientists have tried to replicate these color-changing properties for stealth technologies, anti-counterfeiting measures and electronic displays, but the materials have limitations. Now, researchers have developed a flexible film that changes color in response to stretching, pressure or humidity. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-10-21)

Chili-shaped device could reveal just how hot that pepper is
Some people love spicy food -- the hotter, the better. Others go out of their way to avoid the palate-singeing burn of capsaicin, the compound that gives chili peppers their kick. Now, researchers have developed a portable device (whimsically shaped like a chili pepper) that can reveal how much capsaicin a pepper contains, before biting into it. They report their results in ACS Applied Nano Materials. (2020-10-21)

In pursuit of alternative pesticides
Controlling crop pests is a key element of agriculture worldwide, but the environmental impact of insecticides is a growing concern. Farmers have historically relied on the broad-spectrum chlorpyrifos, which is facing a potential ban in the U.S. A new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, details how scientists are working to develop safer alternatives to chlorpyrifos. (2020-10-21)

Surrey is leading the way in perovskite tandem solar cells
Scientists from the University of Surrey have revealed the significant improvements they are making in perovskite-based solar cells. (2020-10-16)

Calcium bursts kill drug-resistant tumor cells
Multidrug resistance (MDR) -- a process in which tumors become resistant to multiple medicines -- is the main cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. Tumor cells often acquire MDR by boosting their production of proteins that pump drugs out of the cell, rendering the chemotherapies ineffective. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed nanoparticles that release bursts of calcium inside tumor cells, inhibiting drug pumps and reversing MDR. (2020-10-16)

Wearable circuits printed directly on human skin
Wearable electronics are getting smaller, more comfortable and increasingly capable of interfacing with the human body. To achieve a truly seamless integration, electronics could someday be printed directly on people's skin. As a step toward this goal, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have safely placed wearable circuits directly onto the surface of human skin to monitor health indicators, such as temperature, blood oxygen, heart rate and blood pressure. (2020-10-14)

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