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Current Amino acids News and Events, Amino acids News Articles.
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A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method at 37°C
Scientists in Japan have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. (2019-06-14)
Researchers take two steps toward green fuel
An international collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT),Japan, has developed a two-step method to more efficiently break down carbohydrates into their single sugar components, a critical process in producing green fuel. (2019-06-14)
SPbU scientists have discovered the first family of extracellular Rickettsia-like bacteria
Microbiologists of St Petersburg University, together with researchers from the University of Milan, the University of Pisa, and the University of Pavia, have discovered a new family of bacteria belonging to the order Rickettsiales -- Deianiraeaceae. (2019-06-14)
Modified enzyme can increase second-generation ethanol production
Using a protein produced by a fungus that lives in the Amazon, Brazilian researchers developed a molecule capable of increasing glucose release from biomass for fermentation. (2019-06-14)
Construction kit for custom-designed products
Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to product assembly lines. (2019-06-12)
Not silent at all
The so-called 'silent' or 'synonymous' genetic alterations do not result in altered proteins. (2019-06-12)
Curbing your enthusiasm for overeating
Signals between our gut and brain control how and when we eat food. (2019-06-11)
Deceptively simple: Minute marine animals live in a sophisticated symbiosis with bacteria
Trichoplax, one of the simplest animals on Earth, lives in a highly specific and intimate symbiosis with two types of bacteria. (2019-06-10)
How acids behave in ultracold interstellar space
Researchers have investigated how acids interact with water molecules at extremely low temperatures. (2019-06-07)
Researchers develop fast, efficient way to build amino acid chains
Researchers report that they have developed a faster, easier and cheaper method for making new amino acid chains -- the polypeptide building blocks that are used in drug development and industry -- than was previously available. (2019-06-06)
Study shakes up sloth family tree
A pair of studies published June 6, 2019 have shaken up the sloth family tree, overturning a longstanding consensus on how the major groups of sloths are related. (2019-06-06)
New genes out of nothing
One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. (2019-06-04)
Researchers can now predict properties of disordered polymers
Thanks to a team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Massachusetts Amherst, scientists are able to read patterns on long chains of molecules to understand and predict behavior of disordered strands of proteins and polymers. (2019-06-03)
How the enzyme lipoxygenase drives heart failure after heart attacks
Heart failure after a heart attack is a global epidemic leading to heart failure pathology. (2019-05-31)
Astrocytes protect neurons from toxic buildup
Neurons off-load toxic by-products to astrocytes, which process and recycle them. (2019-05-31)
Bacteria's protein quality control agent offers insight into origins of life
The discoveries not only offer new directions for fighting the virulence of some of humanity's most dangerous pathogens, they have implications for our understanding of how life itself evolved. (2019-05-30)
Combination of three gene mutations results in deadly human heart disease
The Human Genome project allowed scientists to identify some rare cases of disease caused by severe mutations of a single gene, but scientists believe that more common forms of disease may be the result of a combination of more subtle genetic mutations that act together. (2019-05-30)
HGF-inhibitory macrocyclic peptide -- mechanisms and potential cancer theranostics
Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is involved in cancer progression through MET receptor signaling. (2019-05-29)
Chimpanzees catch and eat crabs
Chimpanzees have a mainly vegetarian diet, but do occasionally eat meat. (2019-05-29)
Scientists uncover a trove of genes that could hold key to how humans evolved
New computational analysis finds that more than two dozen human zinc finger transcription factors, previously thought to control activity of similar genes across species have in fact human-specific roles and could help explain how our species came to be. (2019-05-27)
Antibiotic ornament clasp
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasing health threat, making new antibiotics essential. (2019-05-27)
More than a protein factory
Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have discovered a new function of ribosomes in human cells that may show the protein-making particle's role in destroying healthy mRNAs, the messages that decode DNA into protein. (2019-05-24)
How to program materials
Can the properties of composite materials be predicted? Empa scientists have mastered this feat and thus can help achieve research objectives faster. (2019-05-21)
Key drug target shown assembling in real-time
Over one-third of all FDA-approved drugs act on a specific family of proteins: G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). (2019-05-20)
Metals influence C-peptide hormone related to insulin
Metals such as zinc, copper and chromium bind to and influence a peptide involved in insulin production, according to new work from chemists at UC Davis. (2019-05-17)
A new approach to targeting cancer cells
A University of California, Riverside, research team has come up with a new approach to targeting cancer cells that circumvents a challenge faced by currently available cancer drugs. (2019-05-17)
A substantial benefit from replacing steak with fish
The average Dane will gain a health benefit from substituting part of the red and processed meat in their diet with fish, according to calculations from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark. (2019-05-16)
Mining 25 years of data uncovers a new predictor of age of onset for Huntington disease
Investigators at the University of British Columbia (UBC)/Centre for Molecular Medicine & Therapeutics (CMMT) and BC Children's Hospital have examined more than 25 years of data to reveal new insights into predicting the age of onset for Huntington disease. (2019-05-16)
What artificial intelligence can teach us about proteins
Proteins are vital parts of all living organisms and perform essential tasks in our bodies. (2019-05-15)
Radioisotope couple for tumor diagnosis and therapy
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Omega a promising combination of radioisotope-carrying molecules for use in radiotheranostics -- a diagnosis-and-treatment approach based on the combination of medical imaging and internal radiation therapy with radioactive elements. (2019-05-13)
How to starve triple negative breast cancer
A team of Brazilian researchers has developed a strategy that slows the growth of triple negative breast cancer cells by cutting them off from two major food sources. (2019-05-13)
New connection found between NAFLD and rare pregnancy complication
A new link has been found between a rare and serious condition that typically presents as itchy palms during pregnancy and the world's most common chronic liver disease, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2019. (2019-05-09)
Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive
A study led by Indiana University researchers reports the first known evidence of bacteria stealing genetic material from their own worst enemy, bacteriophages, and transforming it to survive. (2019-05-09)
Painting a fuller picture of how antibiotics kill
MIT researchers have used machine-learning algorithms to discover a secondary mechanism that helps some antibiotics kill bacteria. (2019-05-09)
Cell architects: 'Smart cells' improve production of pharmaceutical raw materials
Researchers in Japan have developed an integrated synthetic biology system to construct new metabolic pathways and enzymes within microbes. (2019-05-07)
Merging cell datasets, panorama style
A new algorithm developed by MIT researchers takes cues from panoramic photography to merge massive, diverse cell datasets into a single source that can be used for medical and biological studies. (2019-05-06)
New approach could accelerate efforts to catalogue vast numbers of cells
Artistic sketches can be used to capture details of a scene in a simpler image. (2019-05-03)
Seeking better detection for chronic malaria
In people with chronic malaria, certain metabolic systems in the blood change to support a long-term host-parasite relationship, a finding that is key to eventually developing better detection, treatment and eradication of the disease, according to research published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight. (2019-05-02)
Ragon Institute study identifies viral peptides critical to natural HIV control
Investigators at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard have used a novel approach to identify specific amino acids in the protein structure of HIV that appear critical to the ability of the virus to function and replicate. (2019-05-02)
Researchers find new target to improve response to cancer immunotherapy
Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center looked at a little-understood type of cell death called ferroptosis. (2019-05-01)
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