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Current Amino acids News and Events, Amino acids News Articles.
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Nanoparticle system captures heart-disease biomarker from blood for in-depth analysis
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a method combining sticky nanoparticles with high-precision protein measurement to capture and analyze a common marker of heart disease to reveal details that were previously inaccessible. (2020-08-06)
Discovery shows promise for treating Huntington's Disease
Scientists at the lab of Professor Hilal Lashuel at EPFL have identified a new enzyme called ''TBK1'' who plays a central role in regulating the degradation and clearance of the huntingtin protein and introduces chemical modifications that block its aggregation. (2020-08-05)
How microbes in 'starter cultures' make fermented sausage tasty
Microbes in ''starter cultures'' impart a distinctive tang and longer shelf life to food like sourdough bread, yogurt and kimchi through the process of fermentation. (2020-08-05)
Blood-thinner with no bleeding side-effects is here
In a study led by EPFL, scientists have developed a synthetic blood-thinner that, unlike all others, doesn't cause bleeding side-effects. (2020-08-04)
Better at binding SARS-CoV-2: A variant of the human receptor for the virus as a powerful decoy
By exploring variants of a soluble version of the receptor that SARS-CoV-2 uses to binds human cells - which are being considered as therapeutic candidates that neutralize COVID-19 infection by acting as a decoy - researchers identified one that binds the virus's spike protein tightly enough to compete with spike binding by monoclonal antibodies. (2020-08-04)
Researchers create artificial organelles to control cellular behavior
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a method for controlling the phase separation of an emerging class of proteins to create artificial membrane-less organelles within human cells. (2020-08-04)
Reducing the adverse impact of water loss in cells
A University of Houston College of Medicine researcher has found how a protein inside the body reduces the adverse effects of hypertonicity, an imbalance of water and solutes inside cells, which leads to cell death. (2020-08-04)
Dana-Farber study advances understanding of rare sarcoma
In this study, scientists discover how abnormal protein disrupts gene expression in synovial sarcoma. (2020-08-03)
Your hair knows what you eat and how much your haircut costs
University of Utah researchers find that stable isotopes in hair reveal a divergence in diet according to socioeconomic status (SES), with lower-SES areas displaying higher proportions of protein coming from cornfed animals. (2020-08-03)
Anatomy of an acne treatment
Sarecycline, a drug approved for use in the United States in 2018, is the first new antibiotic approved to treat acne in more than 40 years. (2020-08-03)
Nano-sponges of solid acid transform carbon dioxide to fuel and plastic waste to chemicals
The primary cause of climate change is atmospheric CO2, whose levels are rising every day. (2020-07-31)
Two for the price of one
Kyoto University researchers develop a safer and more efficient way to produce dicarboxylic acid. (2020-07-30)
Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis
Scientists have discovered a new way of killing the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), using a toxin produced by the germ itself. (2020-07-29)
Soft robot actuators heal themselves
Repeated activity wears on soft robotic actuators, but these machine's moving parts need to be reliable and easily fixed. (2020-07-27)
High-protein distillers dried grains with solubles provide high quality pig nutrition
With more ethanol in production and a greater ability to upcycle co-products into animal feed ingredients, companies are creating custom products and partnering with University of Illinois researchers to test for quality and digestibility. (2020-07-24)
Machine learning reveals recipe for building artificial proteins
A team lead by Pritzker Molecular Engineering researchers has developed an artificial intelligence-led process that uses big data to design new proteins. (2020-07-24)
Mammal cells could struggle to fight space germs
The immune systems of mammals - including humans - might struggle to detect and respond to germs from other planets, new research suggests. (2020-07-23)
Neandertals may have had a lower threshold for pain
Pain is mediated through specialized nerve cells that are activated when potentially harmful things affect various parts of our bodies. (2020-07-23)
How does cooperation evolve?
In nature, organisms often support each other in order to gain an advantage. (2020-07-23)
Highly stable amyloid protein aggregates may help plant seeds last longer
Highly stable polymeric ''amyloid'' proteins, best known for their role in Alzheimer's disease, have been mostly studied in animals. (2020-07-23)
Engineered SARS-CoV-2 protein offers better stability and yields for vaccine researchers
A team of scientists has engineered the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus - a critical component of potential COVID-19 vaccines - to be more environmentally stable and generate larger yields in the lab. (2020-07-23)
Buckwheat enhances the production of a protein that supports the longevity
A healthy low-calorie diet that contains plant products can help us improve the level of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein production that is known to increase life expectancy. (2020-07-22)
Ultra-small, parasitic bacteria found in groundwater, moose -- and you
In research first published as a pre-print in 2018, and now formally in the journal Cell Reports, scientists describe their findings that Saccharibacteria within a mammalian host are more diverse than ever anticipated. (2020-07-21)
Marine microorganisms: How to survive below the seafloor
Foraminifera, an ancient and ecologically highly successful group of marine organisms, are found on and below the seafloor. (2020-07-20)
New research reveals antifungal symbiotic peptide in legume
Danforth Center scientists, Dilip Shah, PhD, research associate member, Siva Velivelli, PhD, postdoctoral associate, Kirk Czymmek, PhD, principal investigator and director, Advanced Bioimaging Laboratory and their collaborators at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have identified a sub class of peptides in the nodules of the legume, Medicago truncatula that proved effective in inhibiting growth of the fungus causing gray mold. (2020-07-20)
COVID-19: Viral shutdown of protein synthesis
Researchers from Munich and Ulm have determined how the pandemic coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 inhibits the synthesis of proteins in infected cells and shown that it effectively disarms the body's innate immune system (2020-07-17)
Archaeologists use tooth enamel protein to show sex of human remains
A new method for estimating the biological sex of human remains based on reading protein sequences rather than DNA has been used to study an archaeological site in Northern California. (2020-07-17)
Un-natural mRNAs modified with sulfur atoms boost efficient protein synthesis
A group of Japanese scientists has succeeded in the development of modified messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that contain sulfur atoms in the place of oxygen atoms of phosphate moieties of natural mRNAs. (2020-07-16)
Self-eating decisions
Harvard Medical School researchers systematically surveyed the entire protein landscape of normal and nutrient-deprived cells to identify which proteins and organelles are degraded by autophagy. (2020-07-16)
Molecular "tails" are secret ingredient for gene activation
Researchers in the lab of Caltech's Paul Sternberg discover how diverse forms of life are able to use the same cellular machinery for DNA transcription. (2020-07-14)
Cyanobacteria from Lake Chad analyzed for toxins
Analysis of dried cyanobacterial cakes from Lake Chad show that they are rich in needed amino acids, but some exceed WHO standards for microcystin, a potent liver toxin. (2020-07-14)
Hypoglycemic mechanism of Cyclocarya paliurus polysaccharide in type 2 diabetic rats
This research aimed at investigating the hypoglycemic mechanism for CP. (2020-07-13)
Biosignatures may reveal a wealth of new data locked inside old fossils
Step aside, skeletons -- a new world of biochemical ''signatures'' found in all kinds of ancient fossils is revealing itself to paleontologists, providing a new avenue for insights into major evolutionary questions. (2020-07-12)
X-ray scattering shines light on protein folding
KAIST researchers have used an X-ray method to track how proteins fold, which could improve computer simulations of this process, with implications for understanding diseases and improving drug discovery. (2020-07-09)
Surprisingly many peculiar long introns found in brain genes
In a recent study of genes involved in brain functioning, their previously unknown features have been uncovered by bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, RAS. (2020-07-09)
Dissecting fruit flies' varying responses to life-extension diet
Changes in a few small molecules in a cell's metabolism might indicate whether a calorie-restricted diet will extend, shorten, or not effect lifespan, a fruit fly study shows. (2020-07-09)
A new role for a tiny linker in transmembrane ion channels
In a study of large-conductance potassium (BK) channela, Jianhan Chen and colleagues UMass Amherst and Washington University report in eLife that their experiments have revealed 'the first direct example of how non-specific membrane interactions of a covalent linker can regulate the activation of a biological ion channel.' (2020-07-09)
UQ researchers solve a 50-year-old enzyme mystery
Advanced herbicides and treatments for infection may result from the unravelling of a 50-year-old mystery by University of Queensland researchers. (2020-07-09)
Mirror image tumor treatment
Our immune system ought to be able to recognize and kill tumor cells. (2020-07-08)
Fluorescent peptide nanoparticles, in every color of the rainbow
The discovery of green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is made by a jellyfish, transformed cell biology. (2020-07-08)
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