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Current Amino acids News and Events, Amino acids News Articles.
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How do ketogenic diets affect skin inflammation?
Not all fats are equal in how they affect our skin, according to a new study in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier. (2019-10-17)
Figuring out Alzheimer's
Alzheimer's disease and the accompanying personality breakdown frighten many of us. (2019-10-17)
A rat's brain, on and off methamphetamine
Drug addiction is a vicious cycle of reward and withdrawal. (2019-10-16)
X marks the spot: recombination in structurally distinct chromosomes
A recent study from the laboratory of Stowers Investigator Scott Hawley, PhD, has revealed more details about how the synaptonemal complex performs its job, including some surprising subtleties in function. (2019-10-16)
New method for quicker and simpler production of lipidated proteins
The new method developed at TU Graz and the University of Vienna is leading to a better understanding of natural protein modifications and improved protein therapeutics. (2019-10-15)
RUDN University veterinarians developed a way to protect carp from the harmful effects of ammonia
Veterinarians from RUDN University have developed a way to increase the resistance of carp, the most common fish in fish farms, to the harmful effects of ammonia, which is found in almost all water bodies. (2019-10-15)
Ludwig researchers develop machine learning tool to refine personalized immunotherapy
Ludwig Cancer Research scientists have developed a new and more accurate method to identify the molecular signs of cancer likely to be presented to helper T cells, which stimulate and orchestrate the immune response to tumors and infectious agents. (2019-10-15)
Estuarine waters hold promise in global pain-relief hunt
The worldwide search for an opioid alternative has made a leap forward -- with a scientific discovery in an Australian fungus indicating effective pain relief and the potential for a safer less addictive drug, helping address the opioid epidemic of deaths by overdose. (2019-10-14)
Physicists look to navigational 'rhumb lines' to study polymer's unique spindle structure
A new study describes how spheres can be transformed into twisted spindles thanks to insights from 16th century navigational tools. (2019-10-11)
SLAS Discovery releases special issue
October's SLAS Discovery features part 1 of a 2-part special issue on 'Membrane Proteins: New Approaches to Probes, Technologies and Drug Design.' Part 2 of this special edition will be featured in December. (2019-10-11)
New mechanism fueling brain metastasis discovered at Wistar
Wistar scientists described a novel mechanism through which astrocytes, the most abundant supporting cells in the brain, also promote cancer cell growth and metastasis in the brain. (2019-10-09)
Influenza evolution patterns change with time, complicating vaccine design
Skoltech scientists discovered new patterns in the evolution of the influenza virus. (2019-10-08)
Were hot, humid summers the key to life's origins?
Chemists at Saint Louis University, in collaboration with scientists at the College of Charleston and the NSF/NASA Center for Chemical Evolution, found that deliquescent minerals, which dissolve in water they absorb from humid air, can assist the construction of proteins from simpler building blocks during cycles timed to mimic day and night on the early Earth. (2019-10-04)
'Dietary' vulnerability found in cancer cells with mutated spliceosomes
A research team from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center reports it has discovered a metabolic vulnerability in multiple types of cancer cells that bear a common genetic mutation affecting cellular machines called spliceosomes. (2019-10-03)
Engineered viruses could fight drug resistance
MIT biological engineers can program bacteriophages to kill different strains of E. coli by making mutations in the protein that the viruses use to bind to host cells. (2019-10-03)
Dealing a therapeutic counterblow to traumatic brain injury
A team of NJIT biomedical engineers are developing a therapy which shows early indications it can protect neurons and stimulate the regrowth of blood vessels in damaged tissue. (2019-10-03)
Stanford scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate
Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion -- a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University. (2019-10-03)
'Relaxed' enzymes may be at the root of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
Treatments have been hard to pinpoint for a rare neurological disease called Charcot-Marie-Tooth, in part because so many variations of the condition exist. (2019-09-30)
Life's building blocks may have formed in interstellar clouds
An experiment shows that one of the basic units of life -- nucleobases -- could have originated within giant gas clouds interspersed between the stars. (2019-09-27)
New design of bioactive peptide nanofibers keeping both temperature reversibility and stiffness control
A collaboration mainly led by scientists from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan has developed a new method of molecular design to control both temperature reversibility and stiffness of nanofibers that are gel-forming peptides. (2019-09-27)
Spider silk: A malleable protein provides reinforcement
Scientists from the University of Würzburg have discovered that spider silk contains an exceptional protein. (2019-09-26)
Hook-on drugs: New delivery strategy for K-Ras disruption
Dr. Ohkanda succeeded in designing a compound to hook onto the pocket of the enzyme FTase and GGTase I, thereby inhibiting K-Ras. (2019-09-24)
USC researchers hone in on the elusive receptor for sour taste
USC scientists and colleagues identify sour taste receptor. (2019-09-19)
How cancer breaks down your muscles
A solid tumor can cause muscle cells in the body to self-destruct. (2019-09-19)
Bat influenza viruses possess an unexpected genetic plasticity
Bat-borne influenza viruses enter host cells by utilizing surface exposed MHC-II molecules of various species, including humans. (2019-09-17)
New study measures how much of corals' nutrition comes from hunting
When it comes to feeding, corals have a few tricks up their sleeve. (2019-09-17)
Research suggests how environmental toxin produced by algae may lead to ALS
A computer generated-simulation allowed researchers to see how a toxin produced by algal blooms in saltwater might cause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). (2019-09-17)
New piece of Alzheimer's puzzle found
In a study published in Scientific Reports, University of Alberta researcher Jack Jhamandas and his team found two short peptides, or strings of amino acids, that when injected into mice with Alzheimer's disease daily for five weeks, significantly improved the mice's memory. (2019-09-17)
Early signs of adult diabetes are visible in children as young as 8 years old
Early signs of adulthood type 2 diabetes can be seen in children as young as 8 years old, decades before it is likely to be diagnosed, according to a new genetic study being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. (2019-09-17)
Just add water
Chemists uncover a mechanism behind doping organic semiconductors (2019-09-16)
Short-term study suggests vegan diet can boost gut microbes related to body weight, body composition and blood sugar control
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. (2019-09-16)
Gene editing tool gets sharpened by WFIRM team
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have fine-tuned their delivery system to deliver a DNA editing tool to alter DNA sequences and modify gene function. (2019-09-13)
Why do birds migrate at night?
Researchers found migratory birds maximize how much light they get from their environment, so they can migrate even at night.  (2019-09-12)
From years to days: Artificial Intelligence speeds up photodynamics simulations
The prediction of molecular reactions triggered by light is to date extremely time-consuming and therefore costly. (2019-09-11)
Scientists find biology's optimal 'molecular alphabet' may be preordained
Life uses 20 coded amino acids (CAAs) to construct proteins. (2019-09-10)
The diet-microbiome connection in inflammatory bowel disease
A change in diet is a go-to strategy for treating inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's. (2019-09-09)
Key enzyme found in plants could guide development of medicines and other products
Researchers from the Salk Institute studying how plants evolved the abilities to make natural chemicals, which they use to adapt to stress, have uncovered how an enzyme called chalcone isomerase evolved to enable plants to make products vital to their own survival. (2019-09-06)
Why transporters really matter for cell factories
Scientists discover the secret behind some protein transporters' superiority. One transporter, MAE1, can export organic acids out of yeast spending close-to-zero energy. (2019-09-04)
Natural 'breakdown' of chemicals may guard against lung damage in 9/11 first responders
The presence of chemicals made as the body breaks down fats, proteins, and carbohydrates can predict whether Sept. (2019-09-03)
Sexual selection influences the evolution of lamprey pheromones
In 'Intra- and Interspecific Variation in Production of Bile Acids that Act As Sex Pheromones in Lampreys,' published in Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, Tyler J. (2019-09-03)
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