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Current Amputation News and Events

Current Amputation News and Events, Amputation News Articles.
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The feeling a limb doesn't belong is linked to lack of brain structure and connection
People with body integrity dysphoria (BID) often feel as though one of their healthy limbs isn't meant to be a part of their bodies. (2020-05-07)
Prime time for lower extremity artery disease
This article provides an overview of the indications and techniques of lower extremity revascularisation, and an in-depth analysis of the available evidence regarding type and duration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatment following endovascular and surgical revascularisation. (2020-05-06)
Children in rural communities at risk for poor lawnmower injury outcomes
Children in rural communities are 1.7 times more likely to undergo an amputation after a lawnmower injury than children in urban communities, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). (2020-05-01)
Researchers are developing potential treatment for chronic pain
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a new way to treat chronic pain which has been tested in mice. (2020-04-30)
Mind-controlled arm prostheses that 'feel' are now a part of everyday life
For the first time, people with arm amputations can experience sensations of touch in a mind-controlled arm prosthesis that they use in everyday life. (2020-04-29)
Rivaroxaban reduces risk in symptomatic PAD post-intervention
People with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) who took the blood thinner rivaroxaban with aspirin after undergoing a procedure to treat blocked arteries in the leg (lower extremity revascularization) had a 15% reduction in the risk of major adverse limb and cardiovascular events when compared with those receiving aspirin alone, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC). (2020-03-30)
Genetically engineering electroactive materials in living cells
Merging synthetic biology and materials science, researchers genetically coaxed specific populations of neurons to manufacture electronic-tissue 'composites' within the cellular architecture of a living animal, a new proof-of-concept report reveals. (2020-03-19)
Stanford scientists discover the mathematical rules underpinning brain growth
'How do cells with complementary functions arrange themselves to construct a functioning tissue?' said study co-author Bo Wang, an assistant professor of Bioengineering. (2020-03-11)
Uncovering the plastic brain of a fruitfly -- new study
Genetic mechanisms that govern brain plasticity -- the brain's ability to change and adapt -- have been uncovered by researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2020-02-18)
Fewer veterans dying or requiring amputations for critically blocked leg arteries
Between 2005 and 2014, there was a significant decline in the number of veterans hospitalized for critically blocked leg arteries. (2020-02-13)
UConn biomedical engineer creates 'smart' bandages to heal chronic wounds
A new 'smart bandage' developed at UConn could help improve clinical care for people with chronic wounds. (2020-02-13)
Children's fingertip injuries could signal abuse
Many children who suffer fingertip injuries have been abused, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-02-12)
What interventional radiologists need to know about frostbite and amputation
An ahead-of-print article in the April issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) reviewing various techniques and clinical management paradigms to treat severe frostbite injuries -- relevant for interventional radiology, especially--showed promising results using both intraarterial and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator to reduce amputation. (2020-02-06)
Combination of chemo and diabetes drugs shows potential for treating Ewing sarcoma
Houston Methodist researchers propose a combination of two well-known drugs as a new treatment option for Ewing sarcoma -- one of them typically used to treat diabetes. (2019-12-16)
Recovery from years of inactivity requires focusing on doing resistance exercises rapidly
Several years of hospitalisation, one example of muscle inactivity, causes a disproportionate decline in the muscle strength known to affect balance, increase the risk of joint injuries, and hinder movements involved in sports. (2019-11-26)
Clearing damaged cells out of the body helps heal diabetics' blood vessels
Research published today in Experimental Physiology shows that ramping up one of the body's waste disposal system, called autophagy, helps heal the blood vessels of diabetics. (2019-11-17)
Talk to the hand
Fans of the blockbuster movie 'Iron Man 3' might remember the characters step inside the digital projection of a 'big brain' and watch as groups of neurons are 'lit up' along the brain's neural 'map' in response to physical touch. (2019-11-05)
Injuries related to lawn mowers affect young children in rural areas most severely
Each year, more than 9,000 children in the United States are treated in emergency departments for lawn mower-related injuries. (2019-10-25)
Sensory and motor brain plasticity is not limited by location
The new function of unused cortical regions is not necessarily determined by the function of nearby cortical regions, according to new research in adults born without one hand, published in JNeurosci. (2019-10-14)
Researchers discover a new defensive mechanism against bacterial wound infections
Wound inflammation which results in impaired wound healing can have serious consequences for patients. (2019-10-04)
Amputees merge with their bionic leg
In an international collaboration led by scientists in Switzerland, three amputees merge with their bionic prosthetic legs as they climb over various obstacles without having to look. (2019-10-02)
Starting with less-invasive procedures to restore leg blood flow as good at avoiding amputation as starting with open surgery
Patients who underwent a less-invasive procedure to open clogged leg arteries were just a likely to survive with their legs intact as patients who had more invasive surgery. (2019-07-30)
New discovery points toward possible treatment for diabetic non-healing wounds
A new mouse and human tissues study identifies an enzyme critical for normal wound healing that may open up avenues for treatment. (2019-07-23)
Microvascular disease anywhere in the body may be linked to higher risk of leg amputations
Microvascular disease, a disorder of very small blood vessels, may increase the risk of leg amputation independent of other blood vessel conditions and regardless of the location of the microvascular issue, such as eyes (retinopathy), kidneys (nephropathy) or feet (neuropathy). (2019-07-08)
Tailor-made prosthetic liners could help more amputees walk again
Researchers at the University of Bath have developed a new way of designing and manufacturing bespoke prosthetic liners, in less than a day. (2019-06-20)
Scientists find new type of cell that helps tadpoles' tails regenerate
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have uncovered a specialised population of skin cells that coordinate tail regeneration in frogs. (2019-05-16)
Low income is a risk factor for 'catastrophic' amputation after knee joint replacement
Above-knee amputation (AKA) is a rare but severe complication of deep infection after knee replacement surgery. (2019-04-30)
Certain strains of bacteria associated with diabetic wounds that do not heal
Whether a wound -- such as a diabetic foot ulcer -- heals or progresses to a worse outcome, including infection or even amputation, may depend on the microbiome within that wound. (2019-04-18)
Blue light could treat superbug infections
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a bacterium that causes infection in various parts of the body, is often called a 'superbug' thanks to its ability to dodge many common antibiotics. (2019-04-02)
Algae could prevent limb amputation
A new algae-based treatment could reduce the need for amputation in people with critical limb ischemia, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation, published today in the journal npj Regenerative Medicine. (2019-03-20)
Scientists find worms that recently evolved the ability to regrow a complete head
New study reveals regeneration of amputated body parts is not always an ancient trait and scientists might need to rethink the way they compare animals with regenerative abilities. (2019-03-06)
Phantom limb sensation explained
After a limb amputation, brain areas responsible for movement and sensation alter their functional communication. (2019-02-21)
Brain hand 'map' is maintained in amputees with and without phantom limb sensations
Researchers have found that the brain stores detailed information of a missing hand decades after amputation, regardless of whether amputees still experience phantom hand sensations. (2019-02-05)
Rerouting nerves during amputation reduces phantom limb pain before it starts
Doctors have found that a surgery to reroute amputated nerves, called targeted muscle reinnervation, or TMR, can reduce or prevent phantom or residual limb pain from ever occurring in amputee patients who receive the procedure at the time of amputation. (2018-12-27)
Two Type 2 diabetes drugs linked to higher risk of heart disease
Two drugs commonly prescribed to treat Type 2 diabetes carry a high risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure or amputation, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.  The drugs are commonly prescribed to patients after they have taken metformin but need a second-line medication. (2018-12-21)
A prosthetic arm that decodes phantom limb movements
About 75 percent of amputees exhibit mobility of their phantom limb. (2018-11-29)
Artificial joint restores wrist-like movements to forearm amputees
A new artificial joint restores important wrist-like movements to forearm amputees, something which could dramatically improve their quality of life. (2018-11-28)
Certain diabetes drugs linked to increased risk of lower limb amputation
Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors to treat type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of lower limb amputation and diabetic ketoacidosis (a serious diabetes complication) compared with another group of drugs called glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor agonists, finds a study in The BMJ today. (2018-11-14)
Bioreactor device helps frogs regenerate their legs
A team of scientists designed a device that can induce partial hindlimb regeneration in adult aquatic African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) by 'kick-starting' tissue repair at the amputation site. (2018-11-06)
Regeneration science takes a leap forward
Researchers led by Tufts University biologists and engineers have found that delivering progesterone to an amputation injury site can induce the regeneration of limbs in otherwise non-regenerative adult frogs -- a discovery that furthers understanding of regeneration and could help advance treatment of amputation injuries. (2018-11-06)
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