Current Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis News and Events

Current Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis News and Events, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis News Articles.
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World's first: Drug guides stem cells to desired location, improving their ability to heal
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have created a drug that can lure stem cells to damaged tissue and improve treatment efficacy--a scientific first and major advance for the field of regenerative medicine. (2020-11-24)

Dormant threat: Abnormal proteins unleash latent toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases
Though neurodegenerative diseases are becoming more common in today's aging societies, the exact way in which accumulated abnormal proteins become toxic to neurons is unknown. In a recent study conducted at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, scientists have discovered a new mechanism of action by which these abnormal proteins actually unlock the normally latent toxicity of native proteins. Their results represent a completely new avenue toward the development of effective therapies. (2020-11-20)

Gut-brain axis influences multiple sclerosis
A Basel-led international research team has discovered a connection between the intestinal flora and sites of inflammation in the central nervous system in multiple sclerosis. A specific class of immune cell plays a central role in this newly identified gut-brain axis. The discovery could pave the way for new treatments for MS that target the intestinal flora. (2020-11-20)

Predicting forces between oddly shaped nanoparticles
Materials scientists at Duke University have devised a simplified method for calculating the forces that cause nanoparticles to self-assemble. With this new model and graphical user interface, researchers will be able to make previously impossible predictions about how nanoparticles with a wide variety of shapes will interact with one another. The new method offers opportunities for rationally designing such particles for a wide range of applications from harnessing solar energy to driving catalytic reactions. (2020-11-19)

Cellular pathway of genetic heart disease similar to neurodegenerative disease
Research on a genetic heart disease has uncovered a new and unexpected mechanism for heart failure. This landmark discovery found a correlation between the clumping of RNA-binding proteins long linked to neurodegenerative disease and the aggregates of protein found in the heart tissue of patients with RBM20 dilated cardiomyopathy. (2020-11-18)

The long road to dementia
Alzheimer's disease develops over decades. It begins with a fatal chain reaction in which masses of misfolded beta-amyloid proteins are produced that in the end literally flood the brain. Researchers from the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases show in the journal Nature Neuroscience that this chain reaction starts much earlier in mice than commonly assumed. (2020-11-17)

Smartphone use offers tool to treat MS, other diseases
Monitoring how patients with multiple sclerosis or other degenerative diseases use their smartphones could provide valuable information to help get them better treatment. In the journal Chaos, researchers used an app to record the keystroke dynamics of a control group and those of subjects in various stages of MS treatment. In doing so, they observed changes in the way people with MS typed that were not seen in subjects who did not have the disease. (2020-11-17)

New ALS guideline establishes national standard for managing neurodegenerative disease
The first Canadian guideline for the care and management of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- Lou Gehrig's disease -- recommends a patient-focused approach, with attention to holistic and emotional aspects of well-being. The guideline, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191721, is intended for ALS clinicians, allied health professionals and primary care providers, and contains an easy-to-reference table with comprehensive recommendations. (2020-11-16)

Promising MS drug may worsen disease, research suggests
The drug has not yet made it to human trials for multiple sclerosis, but scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine are urging their colleagues to move cautiously. (2020-11-13)

Researchers generate a brain cell type crucial to support neural activity
Researchers of the Department of Cellular Biology, Genetics and Physiology of the University of Malaga (UMA) have succeeded in generating human OLs from pluripotent stem cells derived from patients with nervous system diseases, specifically multiple sclerosis or ALS. (2020-11-12)

Rapid test shows 'solid performance' for diagnosing infection around joint implants
The recently FDA-authorized alpha-defensin lateral flow test is a highly accurate, ten-minute test for diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) - a serious and costly complication of total joint replacement, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2020-11-09)

Two-birds-one-stone strategy shows promise in RNA-repeat expansion diseases
A new strategy for treating a variety of diseases known as RNA-repeat expansion disorders, which affect millions of people, has shown promise in proof-of-principle tests conducted by scientists at Scripps Research. (2020-11-06)

Laser-powered nanomotors chart their own course
The University of Tokyo introduced a system of gold nanorods that acts like a tiny light-driven motor, with its direction of motion is determined by the orientation of the motors. This work may lead to smaller and more precise nanomachines. (2020-11-04)

New artificial skin functions like natural skin
Researchers at RIKEN in Japan have developed an improved human-skin equivalent that reproduces a property that controls the structure and physiological function of skin. This artificial skin will enhance in-depth analyses of physiological skin functions, provide solutions to skin problems caused by diseases or ageing, and reduce the need for animal testing. (2020-10-30)

JNIS: brain-computer allows patients with severe paralysis to text, email, bank
Researchers demonstrated the success of a fully implantable wireless medical device, the Stentrode™ brain-computer interface (BCI), designed to allow patients with severe paralysis to resume daily tasks -- including texting, emailing, shopping and banking online -- without the need for open brain surgery. The first-in-human study was published in the (i>Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery™, the leading international peer-reviewed journal for the clinical field of neurointerventional surgery. (2020-10-28)

Small brain device proves big game changer for severely paralysed patients
A tiny device the size of a small paperclip has been shown to help patients with upper limb paralysis to text, email and even shop online in the first human trial. (2020-10-28)

More than half of American adults with advanced MS report mistreatment by caregivers
Four in 10 people with advanced multiple sclerosis, or MS, are emotionally abused by someone responsible for caring for them, reports a study led by the University of California, Riverside. Further, the study finds one quarter are financially exploited, one in six are neglected, one in nine are battered, and one in 12 are sexually assaulted by a caregiver. (2020-10-27)

Multiple sclerosis as the flip side of immune fitness
About half of the people with multiple sclerosis have the HLA-DR15 gene variant. A study led by the University of Zurich has now shown how this genetic predisposition contributes to the development of the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis in combination with environmental factors. The decisive factor is the shaping of a repertoire of immune cells which - although they are effective in fighting off pathogens such as Epstein-Barr virus - also attack brain tissue. (2020-10-22)

A wearable sensor to help ALS patients communicate
MIT researchers have designed a skin-like device that can be attached to the face and measure small movements such as a twitch or a smile. With this approach, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) could communicate a variety of sentiments with small movements that are measured and interpreted by the device. (2020-10-22)

Why can our brains learn and memorize?
The long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of hippocampal excitatory synapse involved in learning and memory formation in brain have been separately explained, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. The group focused on the competition of exocytosis and endocytosis of AMPA-type glutamate receptors dependent on the number of calcium ions that flow into the postsynaptic neurons, and demonstrated the comprehensive understanding of the LTP and LTD by a large-scale mathematical model simulation. (2020-10-21)

Mayo Clinic: diagnostic, therapeutic advance for rare neurodegenerative disorder
Mayo Clinic researchers, along with national and global collaborators, have developed a potential test for Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) ? a disease that has no cure. They also have clarified the role of a gene target associated with the disease. (2020-10-21)

Coronavirus: Study finds further door opener into the cell
The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is known to infect cells via the receptor ACE2. An international research team under German-Finnish coordination has now identified neuropilin-1 as a factor that can facilitate SARS-CoV-2 entry into the cells' interior. Neuropilin-1 is localized in the respiratory and olfactory epithelia. Experts from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Technical University of Munich, University Medical Center Goettingen, University of Helsinki and other research institutions now published their findings in the journal ''Science''. (2020-10-20)

Anti-inflammatory therapy shows promise in slowing progression of multiple sclerosis
Intranasal administration of an anti-inflammatory drug helped reduce disease progression in a preclinical model of multiple sclerosis, according to recent research out of the University of Alberta. (2020-10-20)

Gut bacteria in multiple sclerosis: Probiotic or commensal, good or bad?
Though evidence suggests that the gut microbiome modulates risk of multiple sclerosis, new findings from the University of Vermont highlight complex interactions between host genetics and environmental factors impact susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. Strategies to prevent or treat multiple sclerosis should take into account host genetics, the pre-existing gut microbiome, and the timing or mode of the intervention. (2020-10-19)

Investigational ALS drug prolongs patient survival in clinical trial
An experimental medication that was recently shown to slow the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has now demonstrated the potential to also prolong patient survival. The findings come from a clinical trial conducted by investigators at the Sean M. Healey & AMG Center for ALS at Massachusetts General Hospital and Amylyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the company that manufactures the medication. (2020-10-16)

New therapy improves treatment for multiple sclerosis
A new therapy that binds a cytokine to a blood protein shows potential in treating multiple sclerosis, and may even prevent it. (2020-10-12)

New class of highly effective inhibitors protects against neurodegeneration
Heidelberg University neurobiologists have uncovered how a special receptor can lead to cell death. Their fundamental findings on neurodegenerative processes simultaneously led the researchers to a completely new principle for therapeutic agents. In their experiments on mouse models, they discovered a new class of highly effective inhibitors for protecting nerve cells. This novel class of drugs opens up perspectives to combat currently untreatable diseases of the nervous system. (2020-10-08)

Simple sugar possible therapy for repairing myelin in multiple sclerosis
N-acetylglucosamine, a simple sugar found in human breast milk and sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement in the United States, promotes myelin repair in mouse models and correlates with myelination levels in multiple sclerosis patients according to a new University of California, Irvine-led study. (2020-10-07)

Study defines risk factors for unemployment in working people with multiple sclerosis
'Risk of unemployment is highest during the first three to five years after diagnosis, so we need to be able to intervene early to prevent job losses, and their subsequent impact. This study points to factors related to risk of unemployment that may be amenable to early intervention. Professionals who provide MS care should be aware of the potential impact of this diagnosis on future employment, and be prepared to intervene before individuals leave the work force.' (2020-10-05)

Are brain-computer interface spellers secure?
Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs), which aim to construct a pathway for people to interact with computers directly by thought, have received great attention in recent years. An electroencephalogram-based BCI speller, which allows the user to input text to computer using brain signals, is one of the most popular BCI systems. However, researchers in China show that these BCI spellers can be easily attacked, exposing a critical security concern in EEG-based BCI systems. (2020-10-03)

A RUDN University biologist described how a harmless bacterium turns into a phytopathogen
A researcher from RUDN University suggested that Xanthomonas bacteria that are harmful to plants might have developed from a nonpathogenic related species by receiving virulence genes from other species of bacteria. (2020-10-03)

Medicine for multiple sclerosis patients inhibits coronavirus - at least in a test tube
A drug which has already been approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis patients effectively inhibits the coronavirus when tested on human lung cells. This is shown by a newly published study from biomedicine researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark. (2020-10-02)

COVID-19: Berlin scientists lay basis for a passive vaccination
Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have identified highly effective antibodies against the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and are now pursuing the development of a passive vaccination. In this process, they have also discovered that some SARS-CoV-2 antibodies bind to tissue samples from various organs, which could potentially trigger undesired side effects. They report their findings in the scientific journal ''Cell''. (2020-09-24)

Accuracy of commercial antibody kits for SARS-CoV-2 varies widely
There is wide variation in the performance of commercial kits for detecting antibodies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), according to a study published September 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jonathan Edgeworth and Blair Merrick of Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Suzanne Pickering and Katie Doores of King's College London, and colleagues. (2020-09-24)

Converting lateral scanning into axial focusing to speed up 3D microscopy
In optical microscopy, high-speed volumetric imaging is limited by either the slow axial scanning rate or aberrations introduced by the z-scanning mechanism. To overcome these limitations, scientists at UT Southwestern have introduced a novel optical design that transforms a lateral-scan motion into a scan in the third dimension. Their microscope realized laser focusing at a rate of 12 kHz and allowed observation of fast dynamics inside cells and the beating heart in Zebrafish embryos. (2020-09-23)

Risk gene for Alzheimer's has early effects on the brain
A genetic predisposition to late-onset Alzheimer's disease affects how the brains of young adults cope with certain memory tasks. Researchers from the DZNE and the Ruhr-Universität Bochum report on this in the scientific journal 'Current Biology'. Their findings are based on studies with magnetic resonance imaging in individuals at the age of about 20 years. The scientists suspect that the observed effects could be related to very early disease processes. (2020-09-15)

Embryos taking shape via buckling
The embryo of an animal first looks like a hollow sphere. Invaginations then appear at different stages of development, which will give rise to the body's structures. Although buckling could be the dominant mechanism that triggers invagination, it has never been possible of measuring the tiny forces involved. This gap has finally been filled thanks to a study carried out by scientists from the University of Geneva. (2020-09-14)

World's first major study into MS and pregnancy reveals it delays onset of MS symptoms by more than 3 years
A comprehensive international study, led by Monash researchers, has definitively found that pregnancy can delay the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) by more than 3 years. (2020-09-14)

Ammonium triggers formation of lateral roots
Despite the importance of changes in root architecture to exploit local nutrient patches, mechanisms integrating external nutrient signals into the root developmental program remain poorly understood. ''Here, we show for the first time that local ammonium supply stimulates the accumulation of auxin in the root vasculature and promotes auxin diffusion and lateral root formation to build a highly branched root system'', says Prof. Nicolaus von Wirén from the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK). (2020-09-11)

Unlocking the mystery of tau for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases
A team of researchers from various collaborating universities and hospitals in Japan has uncovered crucial molecular details regarding the activity of the ''tau'' protein, promising to revolutionize the therapy of tau-induced neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-09-09)

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