Nav: Home

Current Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis News and Events

Current Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis News and Events, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Mutation of the co-chaperone Tsc1 in bladder cancer diminishes Hsp90 acetylation and reduces drug sensitivity and selectivity
The researchers have recently identified the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 as a new co-chaperone of Hsp90 that affects Hsp90 binding to its inhibitors. (2019-10-10)
Scientists ask: How can liquid organelles in cells coexist without merging?
New research may help to explain an intriguing phenomenon inside human cells: how wall-less liquid organelles are able to coexist as separate entities instead of just merging together. (2019-10-10)
Tau-mediated RNA splicing errors linked to Alzheimer's disease
A collaborative study provides evidence for a new molecular cause for neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease that links alterations in RNA splicing and tau-mediated neurodegeneration. (2019-10-08)
A timekeeper for siesta
External stimuli can rearrange the hierarchy of neuronal networks and influence behaviour. (2019-10-07)
UVA discovers surprise contributor to multiple sclerosis
The discovery suggests new avenues for devising treatments and is a vital step toward finding a cure. (2019-10-07)
Stem cell treatments for shoulder and elbow injuries flourish, but so far there's little evidence they work
Two critical reviews in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, published by Elsevier, examine the current status of biologic approaches for common shoulder and elbow problems. (2019-10-01)
Can excessive athletic training make your brain tired? New study says yes
You'd expect excessive athletic training to make the body tired, but can it make the brain tired too? (2019-09-26)
Genomic map implicates broad immune cell involvement in multiple sclerosis
In a study of 115,803 individuals, the authors have identified 233 sites or loci in the human genome that contribute to the onset of MS. (2019-09-26)
Researchers perform thousands of mutations to understand amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Researchers from IBEC and CRG in Barcelona use a technique called high-throughput mutagenesis to study Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), with unexpected results. (2019-09-23)
Study finds hub linking movement and motivation in the brain
Detailed observations in the lateral septum indicate that the well-connected region processes movement, and reward information to help direct behavior. (2019-09-19)
Cellular hitchhikers may hold a key to understanding ALS
RNA molecules get around nerve cells by hitching a ride on lysosomes. (2019-09-19)
Quality control in cells
A protective protein that detects newly-made incomplete protein chains in higher cells is found to have a relative in bacteria. (2019-09-19)
Researchers relate neuropsychological tests with real-life activity in multiple sclerosis
To best serve the clinical needs of individuals with MS, neuropsychological testing needs to be viewed in larger context comprising non-cognitive variables, such as motor ability and demographic values, fatigue and depression, and disease activity and level of disability, as well as person-specific factors such as personality and coping styles. (2019-09-19)
ALS gene may be a hitchhiker's guide to the neuron
Researchers discovered that annexin A11, a gene linked to a rare form of ALS, may play a critical role in the transport of important, RNA encoded housekeeping instructions throughout neurons. (2019-09-19)
Wearable brain-machine interface could control a wheelchair, vehicle or computer
Combining new classes of nanomembrane electrodes with flexible electronics and a deep learning algorithm could help disabled people wirelessly control an electric wheelchair, interact with a computer or operate a small robotic vehicle without donning a bulky hair-electrode cap or contending with wires. (2019-09-19)
Research suggests how environmental toxin produced by algae may lead to ALS
A computer generated-simulation allowed researchers to see how a toxin produced by algal blooms in saltwater might cause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). (2019-09-17)
New app offers faster and easier assessment for multiple sclerosis
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have developed and validated a tablet-based app that offers a faster, easier and more accurate way for health care providers who don't have specialized training to assess the cognitive function of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). (2019-09-09)
Researchers develop new interferometric single-molecule localization microscopy
Prof. XU Tao and Prof. JI Wei from Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a new interferometric single molecule localization microscopy with fast modulated structured illumination which named Repetitive Optical Selective Exposure (ROSE). (2019-09-09)
New compound promotes healing of myelin in nervous system disorders
Researchers working with mice have developed a compound that promotes rebuilding of the protective sheath around nerve cells that's damaged in conditions such as multiple sclerosis. (2019-09-06)
Researchers uncover role of earthquake motions in triggering a 'surprise' tsunami
In newly published research, an international team of geologists, geophysicists, and mathematicians show how coupled computer models can accurately recreate the conditions leading to the world's deadliest natural disasters of 2018, the Palu earthquake and tsunami, which struck western Sulawesi, Indonesia in September last year. (2019-09-05)
New insight into motor neuron death mechanisms could be a step toward ALS treatment
Researchers have made an important advance toward understanding why certain cells in the nervous system are prone to breaking down and dying, which is what happens in patients with ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. (2019-09-04)
Researchers find a new pathological mediator of ALS
A research collaboration based in Japan has found a new pathological mediator of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which could have further implications for understanding the molecular breakdown that gives rise to the neurodegenerative disease that affects nearly half a million people around the world. (2019-09-02)
Kessler researchers investigate social cognition, mood and fatigue in multiple sclerosis
The researchers emphasized the preliminary nature of their findings and recommended further research in individuals with MS, as well in other populations with non-neurologic conditions, and healthy controls. (2019-08-29)
AAN issues guideline on vaccines and multiple sclerosis
Can a person with multiple sclerosis (MS) get regular vaccines? (2019-08-28)
A new drug could revolutionize the treatment of neurological disorders
The international team of scientists from Gero Discovery LLC, the Institute of Biomedical Research of Salamanca, and Nanosyn, Inc. has found a potential drug that may prevent neuronal death through glucose metabolism modification in stressed neurons. (2019-08-28)
Machine learning increases resolution of eye imaging technology
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised a method for increasing the resolution of optical coherence tomography (OCT) down to the single micrometer in all directions, even in a living patient. (2019-08-27)
Medicare patients with multiple sclerosis bear the burden of rising drug prices
In a decade, Medicare recipients saw a sevenfold increase in out of pocket costs for multiple sclerosis drugs. (2019-08-26)
Protein-transport discovery may help define new strategies for treating eye disease
Many forms of vision loss stem from a common source: impaired communication between the eye and the brain. (2019-08-21)
How to improve multiple sclerosis therapy
Medications currently used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS) can merely reduce relapses during the initial relapsing-remitting phase. (2019-08-20)
NIH study in mice identifies type of brain cell involved in stuttering
Researchers believe that stuttering -- a potentially lifelong and debilitating speech disorder -- stems from problems with the circuits in the brain that control speech, but precisely how and where these problems occur is unknown. (2019-08-19)
Vegetable-rich diet lowers fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients by raising good cholesterol
Higher levels of blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL) -- or good cholesterol -- may improve fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients, according to a new University at Buffalo-led study. (2019-08-15)
Robotic neck brace dramatically improves functions of ALS patients
A Columbia Engineering-designed robotic brace that supports the neck during its natural motion is the first device shown to dramatically assist ALS patients in holding their heads and actively supporting them during range of motion. (2019-08-12)
Smoldering spots in the brain may signal severe MS
Aided by a high-powered brain scanner and a 3D printer, NIH researchers peered inside the brains of hundreds of multiple sclerosis patients and found that dark rimmed spots representing ongoing, 'smoldering' inflammation, called chronic active lesions, may be a hallmark of more aggressive and disabling forms of the disease. (2019-08-12)
Study furthers radically new view of gene control
Researchers have discovered physical interactions between proteins and DNA that help explain why specialized droplets called condensates, which contain the machinery needed to copy DNA into RNA, tend to cluster at genomic regions that are particularly active in a given cell. (2019-08-08)
Forgotten immune cells protective in mouse model of multiple sclerosis
A seldom-studied class of immune cells may reduce the friendly fire that drives autoimmune disease, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2019-08-07)
Experimental treatment slows prion disease, extends life of mice
Scientists using an experimental treatment have slowed the progression of scrapie, a degenerative central nervous disease caused by prions, in laboratory mice and greatly extended the rodents' lives, according to a new report in JCI Insight. (2019-08-01)
Light for the nanoworld
An international team headed up by Alexander Holleitner and Jonathan Finley, physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has succeeded in placing light sources in atomically thin material layers with an accuracy of just a few nanometers. (2019-08-01)
Ground breaking Trinity research shows how MND affects multiple brain networks
Researchers in the Academic Unit of Neurology at Trinity College Dublin have identified characteristic changes in the patterns of electrical brain wave activity in motor neurone disease (MND). (2019-07-31)
Researchers repair faulty brain circuits using nanotechnology
Working with mouse and human tissue, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that a protein pumped out of some -- but not all -- populations of 'helper' cells in the brain, called astrocytes, plays a specific role in directing the formation of connections among neurons needed for learning and forming new memories. (2019-07-30)
Key gene behind hallmark of Lou Gehrig's disease identified
Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators have pinpointed a key gene behind the formation of a toxic protein in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (2019-07-29)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...