Current Analgesics News and Events

Current Analgesics News and Events, Analgesics News Articles.
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Breaking the coupling process
Real-time observation of signal transmission in proteins provides new insights for drug research. (2020-10-06)

Researchers develop a yeast-based platform to boost production of rare natural molecules
Researchers at Concordia University in Montreal and in Berkeley, California outline a method to synthesize complex bioactive molecules much more quickly and efficiently. Using cutting-edge synthetic biology approaches, They were able to produce a large amount of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid (BIA) to synthesize an array of natural and new-to-nature chemical structures in a yeast-based platform. This can provide a blueprint for the large-scale production of thousands of products, including the opioid analgesics morphine and codeine. (2020-08-27)

Lack of females in drug dose trials leads to overmedicated women
Women are more likely than men to suffer adverse side effects of medications because drug dosages have historically been based on clinical trials conducted on men, suggests new research from the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Chicago. (2020-08-12)

New guidelines for managing mucositis now available
New guidelines are now available to provide healthcare professionals with better tools to manage mucositis, a common and often debilitating complication of cancer therapy. (2020-08-11)

Study finds increase in number, severity of suicide-related calls to US Poison Control
Researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed the 549,807 calls made to Poison Control Centers (PCCs) in the U.S. for suicide-related cases involving OTC analgesics from 2000 through 2018 and found that both the overall number and rate of these cases increased significantly by 57% and 34%, respectively, during this period. (2020-07-27)

LSU Health New Orleans discovers new class of safer analgesics
Researchers at LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence and colleagues have discovered a new class of pipeline drugs to relieve pain and reduce fever without the danger of addiction or damage to the liver or kidneys. (2020-07-06)

BU researchers design artificial genes to sense cellular responses to drugs
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have developed and implemented a new way to better understand how human cells communicate with each other, how this communication. (2020-07-06)

More than medicine: Pain-relief drug delivers choices for mothers in labor
Choice and control are important factors for ensuring a positive childbirth experience, yet until recently, little was known about the impact of alternative administrations of fentanyl -- one of the pain relief drugs used during labour- on both mother and baby. (2020-06-30)

Women significantly more likely to be prescribed opioids, study shows
Women are significantly more likely to receive prescriptions of opioid analgesics. (2020-06-29)

Sex bias in pain research
Most pain research remains overwhelmingly based on the study of male rodents, continuing to test hypotheses derived from earlier experiments on males. This points to an important blind spot in pain research, particularly as it relates to advancing research into new pain medications. (2020-05-21)

Comparison of early postoperative pain after first vs second total knee arthroplasty
Comparing the postoperative period following the first and second TKA, there were no significant differences in Wong-Baker FACES pain assessment score (WBS) 24, 48, and 72 hrs postoperatively. (2020-05-18)

Study reveals pharmacy-level barriers to treatment for opioid use disorder in Appalachian Kentucky
A new study led by University of Kentucky researcher April Young and Emory University researcher Hannah Cooper shows that a number of pharmacies in the Appalachian region of Kentucky are limiting the dispensing of buprenorphine, a medication used to treat opioid use disorder (OUD). (2020-04-28)

More than half of US opioid prescriptions for dental procedures exceeded 3-day supply recommendations from CDC 2016 guidelines
Dentists are among top prescribers of opioids in the US, however, whether their opioid prescribing exceeds guidance had not been investigated. A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine indicates that more than half of opioid prescriptions issued by dentists exceed the three-day supply recommended by the CDC for acute dental pain management. The findings also show that 29% of dental patients received more powerful opioids than needed for expected post-procedure pain. (2020-02-04)

More than half of dental prescriptions for opioids exceed pain-management guidelines
A new study suggests that roughly half of the opioid prescriptions written by dentists in the United States exceed the 3-day supply recommended by federal dental pain-management guidelines. (2020-02-04)

Our biological clock plays crucial role in healing from surgery
If you have just had knee, shoulder or hip surgery, you may want to take anti-inflammatories in the morning or at noon, but not at night. A McGill-led study shows, for the first time, that circadian clock genes are involved in healing from surgery. Indeed, the researchers demonstrated that anti-inflammatory medications are most effective in promoting post-operative healing and recovery when taken during the active periods of our biological clocks. (2020-01-21)

Focus on opioids and cannabis in chronic pain media coverage
New Zealand media reports on chronic pain are focusing on treatments involving opioids and cannabis at the expense of best practice non-drug treatments, researchers have found. (2020-01-16)

BU finds concerns about other painkillers contributed to opioid crisis
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study published in JAMA Network Open shows that the decline in prescriptions of non-opioid analgesics -- largely NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors -- in the early 2000s coincided with a marked increase in opioid prescribing. (2019-12-11)

One-third of children having tonsillectomies benefitted from opioid-free surgery and recovery
Nearly one-third of children who had surgery to remove their tonsils did not need opioids to get adequate pain relief during and after surgery, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. (2019-10-20)

Did providing free essential medicines increase adherence?
More patients who said they couldn't afford their medications adhered to treatment when they received free essential medicines for one year in a randomized clinical trial, but not all measures of health outcomes improved. The trial enrolled 786 patients (764 completed it) at nine primary care sites in Ontario, Canada. Patients were randomly split into two groups: 395 received free essential medicines plus usual care and 391 had usual care and usual access to medicines. (2019-10-07)

Anxiety among patient factors linked to more opioid use after surgery
Surgeons wielding their life-saving scalpels, laparoscopic tools, or other implements to repair or remove what ails their patients understand all too well that pain is an unavoidable part of the healing process. Yet the current opioid crisis has made the standard prescribing practices for these highly effective analgesics fraught with risk. New research from Michigan Medicine could help clinicians mitigate that risk by identifying which patients are more likely to continue to use opioids after their immediate recovery period. (2019-08-22)

Multi-tasking protein at the root of neuropathic pain
Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition resulting from nerve injury and is characterized by increased pain sensitivity. Although known to be associated with overly excitable neurons in the spinal cord, the mechanisms leading to chronic pain are poorly understood. Researchers from Osaka University have now shown that expression of a protein called FLRT3 in the spinal dorsal root ganglion causes pain sensitization, which can be alleviated by treatment with FLRT3-blocking antibodies. (2019-08-20)

Opioid prescribing rates higher in US compared with other countries
Physicians in the United States may prescribe opioids more frequently to patients during hospitalization and at discharge when compared to their physician peers in other countries, according to a recently published study led by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine. (2019-07-24)

Opioid analgesics increase the risk of pneumonia among persons with Alzheimer's disease
Opioid analgesics were associated with a 30% increase in the risk of pneumonia in persons with Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The risk was most pronounced in the first two months of use. This is the first study to investigate the association between opioids and pneumonia in this population. The results were published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. (2019-06-04)

Short-term use of opioids increases subjective pleasure
As indicated by a recently published study, short-term opioid use shifts a range of emotional responses to the positive direction. This may be one of the reasons behind the onset of opioid use disorder. (2019-05-24)

Bullying linked to student's pain medication use
In a school-based survey study of all students in grades 6, 8, and 10 in Iceland, the use of pain medications was significantly higher among bullied students even when controlling for the amount of pain they felt, as well as age, gender, and socioeconomic status. The findings are published in Acta Paediatrica. (2019-05-09)

UMN researchers study effect of chronic opioid therapy on pain and survival in sickle cell disease
New UMN research recently published in Blood Advances, Kalpna Gupta, PhD, Professor of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, demonstrates the impact of opioids on the survival of humanized mouse models with sickle cell disease, compared to normal mice. (2019-04-02)

CHOP surgeons find opioids often overprescribed for elbow fractures in children
Opioid drugs prescribed to children for pain relief after a typical pediatric orthopaedic procedure may be significantly overprescribed, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The patients used less than 25 percent of the drugs, suggesting a potential risk of opioid diversion. (2019-01-16)

Tobacco use linked with higher use of opioids and sedatives
Tobacco is a known risk factor for the misuse of prescription opioids. In addition, concurrent use of opioids and sedative-hypnotics is a risk factor for opioid overdose or addiction. In an American Journal on Addictions study, tobacco users were more likely to receive prescriptions for opioid analgesics with muscle relaxants and/or benzodiazepines than people who did not use tobacco. (2019-01-09)

Opioid crisis roadmap overlooks gender
Women's Health Research at Yale (WHRY) is calling on a government committee to revise its report on a coordinated response to the opioid epidemic so that it reflects the unique needs of women. (2019-01-06)

New study sheds light on medication administration errors leading to death -- omission is a common cause
Medication administration errors leading to death are common with anticoagulants and antibiotics in particular, according to a new study that analyzed incidents reported in England and Wales. The most common error category was omitted medicine, followed by a wrong dose or a wrong strength. In half of the reported incidents, the patient was aged over 75. (2018-12-04)

Do not give decongestants to young children for common cold symptoms, say experts
Decongestants should not be given to children under 6 -- and given with caution in children under 12 -- as there is no evidence that they alleviate symptoms such as a blocked or runny nose, and their safety is unclear, say experts in The BMJ today. (2018-10-10)

North-South chronic 'pain divide' evident in England
England has a North-South 'pain divide', with a clear geographical split in the prevalence and intensity of chronic pain and the use of potentially addictive opioids for symptom relief, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open. Given the public health concerns associated with the long term use of opioids and doubts about their ability to effectively treat chronic pain, better guidance for clinicians on how to manage these symptoms is essential, say the researchers. (2018-09-11)

New CDC guidelines detail treatment of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury
New evidence-based guidelines, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with input from the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and others put forward recommendations for a broad range of health care providers responsible for detection and management of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury, most of which are concussions. (2018-09-05)

CPM for knee or shoulder joints: Advantage only in two therapeutic indications
Less pain in stiff shoulders and improved mobility after total knee replacement - but the final report does not confirm greater benefit in rotator cuff tears. (2018-08-06)

BIDMC study determines risk factors for opioid misuse
When opioids are prescribed following surgery, approximately four percent of the general patient population will continue using opioids for an extended time period. Race and household income were not significant risk factors for prolonged opioid use. Physicians' prescribing practices may influence patient risk. Patients in the worker's compensation setting experienced the highest rates of prolonged opioid use (2018-08-01)

Anticonvulsant drugs ineffective for low back pain and can cause harm, despite increased prescribing
Anticonvulsant drugs are increasingly being used to treat low back pain, but a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) finds they are ineffective and can have adverse effects. (2018-07-03)

Survey shows Australian GPs cautiously supportive of medicinal cannabis access
A majority of Australian GPs support medicinal cannabis being available on prescription, with their preferred 'access model' involving trained general practitioners prescribing independently of specialists, a national survey published in the British Medical Journal Open today reveals. The majority (61.5 percent of GPs) had received at least one patient inquiry about medicinal cannabis in the past three months but fewer than one in 10 knew how to navigate the bureaucratic processes involved in its prescription. (2018-07-03)

Study with implications for opioid crisis finds opioids raise risk of fracture nonunion
Dr. Robert Zura, Professor and Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, was part of a research team reporting that not only may opioid use increase the risk of bone fractures, but opioids may also impair healing. The authors also question their effectiveness in controlling pain. (2018-06-15)

Effect of an opioid prescribing protocol on provider prescribing behavior
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Chad Lowell Wagner, University of Minnesota School of Dentistry, Minneapolis, presented a poster titled 'Effect of an Opioid Prescribing Protocol on Provider Prescribing Behavior.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018. (2018-03-23)

Multimodal approach to pain management reduces opioids, prescriptions after joint replacement
A multimodal approach to pain management (using two or more different methods or medications to manage pain) rather than using opioids alone was associated with a decrease in opioid use, opioid prescriptions and common opioid-related complications in patients undergoing total hip or knee replacements, according to a study published today in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). (2018-03-01)

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