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Current Ancient dna News and Events, Ancient dna News Articles.
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Gene therapy: Development of new DNA transporters
Scientists at the Institute of Pharmacy at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed new delivery vehicles for future gene therapies. (2019-11-18)
Genetic alterations caused by cancer therapies identified
Scientists at IRB Barcelona determine the genetic alterations in the cells of cancer patients caused by the main cancer therapies. (2019-11-18)
Lichens are way younger than scientists thought
Lichens -- a combo of fungus and algae -- can grow on bare rocks, so scientists thought that lichens were some of the first organisms to make their way onto land from the water, changing the planet's atmosphere and paving the way for modern plants. (2019-11-15)
Early DNA lineages shed light on the diverse origins of the contemporary population
A new genetic study carried out at the University of Helsinki and the University of Turku demonstrates that, at the end of the Iron Age, Finland was inhabited by separate and differing populations, all of them influencing the gene pool of modern Finns. (2019-11-15)
A potential new way to diagnose male infertility and pharmaceutical treatment options
Washington State University-led research has discovered infertile men have identifiable patterns of epigenetic molecules or biomarkers attached to their sperm DNA that aren't present in fertile men. (2019-11-14)
Discovery reveals mechanism that turns herpes virus on and off
New research from Dr. Luis M. Schang and his group at the Baker Institute for Animal Health has identified a new mechanism that plays a role in controlling how the herpes virus alternates between dormant and active stages of infection. (2019-11-14)
Extinct giant ape directly linked to the living orangutan
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have succeeded in reconstructing the evolutionary relationship between a two million year old giant primate and the living orangutan. (2019-11-13)
Crick researchers unravel protective properties of telomere t-loops
Loops at the ends of telomeres play a vital protective role preventing irretrievable damage to chromosomes, according to new research from the Crick. (2019-11-13)
Oldest molecular information to date illuminates the history of extinct Gigantopithecus
In the study, published in Nature, the team rebuilds multiple dental enamel proteins from an approximately two million-year-old Gigantopithecus molar fossil. (2019-11-13)
Predicting evolution
A new method of 're-barcoding' DNA allows scientists to track rapid evolution in yeast. (2019-11-13)
Ancient Egyptians gathered birds from the wild for sacrifice and mummification
In ancient Egypt, sacred ibises were collected from their natural habitats to be ritually sacrificed, according to a study released Nov. (2019-11-13)
Yale study finds 'hyperhotspots' that could predict skin cancer risk
New research by Yale University scientists reports the discovery of 'hyperhotspots' in the human genome, locations that are up to 170-times more sensitive to ultraviolet radiation (UV) from sunlight compared to the genome average. (2019-11-13)
SMAD2 and SMAD3, two almost identical transcription factors but with distinct roles
Both transcription factors regulate the expression of genes involved in embryo development, among other functions, although they exert very different roles. (2019-11-12)
Scientists explore Egyptian mummy bones with x-rays and infrared light
Experiments at Berkeley Lab are casting a new light on Egyptian soil and ancient mummified bone samples that could provide a richer understanding of daily life and environmental conditions thousands of years ago. (2019-11-12)
First evidence of feathered polar dinosaurs found in Australia
A cache of 118 million-year-old fossilized dinosaur and bird feathers has been recovered from an ancient lake deposit that once lay beyond the southern polar circle. (2019-11-12)
At future Mars landing spot, scientists spy mineral that could preserve signs of past life
Using orbital instruments to peer into Jezero crater, the landing site for NASA's Mars 2020 rover, researchers found deposits of hydrated silica, a mineral that's great at preserving microfossils and other signs of life. (2019-11-12)
Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Scholars have been all over Rome for hundreds of years, but it still holds some secrets - for instance, relatively little is known about where the city's denizens actually came from. (2019-11-08)
Scientists develop method to standardize genetic data analysis
MIPT researchers have collaborated with Atlas Biomedical Holding and developed a new bioinformatics data analysis method. (2019-11-08)
Neural network fills in data gaps for spatial analysis of chromosomes
Computational methods used to fill in missing pixels in low-quality images or video also can help scientists provide missing information for how DNA is organized in the cell, computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have shown. (2019-11-07)
Ancient roman DNA reveals genetic crossroads of Europe and Mediterranean
All roads may lead to Rome, and in ancient times, a great many European genetic lineages did too, according to a new study. (2019-11-07)
Stanford researchers lay out first genetic history of Rome
Despite extensive records of the history of Rome, little is known about the city's population over time. (2019-11-07)
UCI-led study reveals non-image light sensing mechanism of circadian neurons
University of California, Irvine researchers reveal how an ancient flavoprotein response to ultra violet (UV), blue and red light informs internal circadian processes about the time of day. (2019-11-07)
The genetic imprint of Palaeolithic has been detected in North African populations
Researchers led by David Comas for the first time performed an analysis of the complete genome of the population of North Africa. (2019-11-06)
Revealed a mechanism of beta-cells involved in the development of type-1 diabetes
Researchers reveal how beta cells in the pancreas respond to an inflammatory environment and how this response is implicated in the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes. (2019-11-06)
HKU astronomy research team unveils one origin of globular clusters around giant galaxies
A study led by Dr Jeremy Lim and his Research Assistant, Miss Emily Wong, at the Department of Physics of The University of Hong Kong (HKU), utilizing data from the Hubble Space Telescope, has provided surprising answers to the origin of some globular clusters around giant galaxies at the centers of galaxy clusters. (2019-11-05)
Ancient bone protein reveals which turtles were on the menu in Florida, Caribbean
Thousands of years ago, the inhabitants of modern-day Florida and the Caribbean feasted on sea turtles, leaving behind bones that tell tales of ancient diets and the ocean's past. (2019-11-04)
Online tool speeds response to elephant poaching by tracing ivory to source
A new tool uses an interactive database of geographic and genetic information to quickly identify where the confiscated tusks of African elephants were originally poached. (2019-11-01)
A new spin on life's origin?
University of Tokyo researchers used a rotary evaporator to coax non-chiral molecules to form supermolecules of a specific helicity. (2019-11-01)
Status of proteins housing DNA controls how cells maintain identity
The inheritance, not only of DNA, but of changes to proteins that package it, maintains the identity of cells as they multiply, a new study finds. (2019-10-31)
Mutated form of DNA repair protein may shed light on its role in preventing cancer
Clemson University researcher Jennifer Mason created a mutated version of RAD51, a DNA repair protein, to better understand its critical functions at key steps in the cell replication process during times of stress. (2019-10-31)
Ancient rhinos roamed the Yukon
Paleontologists have used modern tools to identify the origins of a few fragments of teeth found more than four decades ago by a schoolteacher in the Yukon. (2019-10-31)
In one direction or the other: That is how DNA is unwound
DNA is like a book, it needs to be opened to be read. (2019-10-30)
Genetic history of endangered Australian songbird could inspire an encore
The genetic history of a critically endangered songbird shows its best chance of survival is to protect its rapidly disappearing habitat. (2019-10-30)
Two million-year-old ice provides snapshot of Earth's greenhouse gas history
Two million-year old ice from Antarctica recently uncovered by a team of researchers provides a clearer picture into the connections between greenhouse gases and climate in ancient times and will help scientists understand future climate change. (2019-10-30)
DNA is like everything else: it's not what you have, but how you use it
A new paradigm for reading out genetic information in DNA is described by Dr. (2019-10-28)
Researchers find 'protein-scaffolding' for repairing DNA damage
At the University of Copenhagen, researchers have discovered how some types of proteins stabilize damaged DNA and thereby preserve DNA function and integrity. (2019-10-28)
Advanced cancer drug shrinks and intercalates DNA
A new study published in EPJ E has found that the drug first forces itself between the strands of the DNA molecule's double helix, prising them apart. (2019-10-28)
Study tracks evolutionary history of metabolic networks
By analyzing how metabolic enzymes are built and organized, researchers have reconstructed the evolutionary history of metabolism. (2019-10-28)
Science reveals improvements in Roman building techniques
In research published in EPJ Plus, researchers have carried out scientific analysis of the materials used to build the Atrium Vestae in Rome. (2019-10-25)
New study on early human fire acquisition squelches debate
'Fire was presumed to be the domain of Homo sapiens but now we know that other ancient humans like Neanderthals could create it,' says Daniel Adler of UConn. (2019-10-25)
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