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Current Ancient dna News and Events, Ancient dna News Articles.
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A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method at 37°C
Scientists in Japan have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. (2019-06-14)
Virus genes help determine if pea aphids get their wings
Researchers from the University of Rochester shed light on the important role that microbial genes, like those from viruses, can play in insect and animal evolution. (2019-06-14)
Researchers identify traits linked to better outcomes in HPV-linked head and neck cancer
University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers identified characteristics that could be used to personalize treatment for patients with a type of head and neck cancer linked to HPV infection. (2019-06-14)
New gene editor harnesses jumping genes for precise DNA integration
Scientists at Columbia have developed a gene-editing tool -- using jumping genes -- that inserts any DNA sequence into the genome without cutting, fixing a major shortcoming of existing CRISPR technology. (2019-06-12)
The origins of cannabis smoking: marijuana use in the first millennium BC
Cannabis has been cultivated as an oil-seed and fiber crop for millennia in East Asia. (2019-06-12)
The origins of cannabis smoking: Marijuana use in the first millennium BC
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in the Pamir Mountains of western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. (2019-06-12)
Breakthrough in the discovery of DNA in ancient bones buried in water
Fresh evidence rewrites the understanding of the most intriguing archaeological burial site in western Finland. (2019-06-11)
From face to DNA: New method aims to improve match between DNA sample and face database
Predicting what someone's face looks like based on a DNA sample remains a hard nut to crack for science. (2019-06-11)
New microneedle technique speeds plant disease detection
Researchers have developed a new technique that uses microneedle patches to collect DNA from plant tissues in one minute, rather than the hours needed for conventional techniques. (2019-06-10)
Ancient DNA from Roman and medieval grape seeds reveal ancestry of wine making
A grape variety still used in wine production in France today can be traced back 900 years to just one ancestral plant, scientists have discovered. (2019-06-10)
The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean
The cholera bacterium uses a grappling hook-like appendage to take up DNA, bind to nutritious surfaces and recognize 'family' members, EPFL scientists have found. (2019-06-10)
DNA base editing induces substantial off-target RNA mutations
Researchers from Dr. YANG Hui's Lab at the Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and collaborators from the CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology of CAS and Sichuan University demonstrated that DNA base editors generated tens of thousands of off-target RNA single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and these off-target SNVs could be eliminated by introducing point mutations to the deaminases. (2019-06-10)
Behavioural correlations of the domestication syndrome are decoupled in modern dog breeds
A new study published in Nature Communications by a team of researchers from Stockholm University used behavioural data from more than 76,000 dogs, to test the hypothesis that key behaviours in the domestication syndrome are correlated. (2019-06-07)
Drug makes tumors more susceptible to chemo
Researchers at MIT and Duke University have discovered a potential drug compound that can block a mutagenic DNA repair pathway that helps cancer cells survive chemotherapy. (2019-06-06)
New research shakes up the sloth family tree
New research on the evolutionary relationships between tree sloths and their extinct giant relatives is challenging decades of widely accepted scientific research. (2019-06-06)
Scientists get a grip on sloth family tree
A new study, by an international team of researchers led by academics at the University of York, challenges decades of scientific opinion concerning the evolutionary relationships of tree sloths and their extinct kin. (2019-06-06)
Study shakes up sloth family tree
A pair of studies published June 6, 2019 have shaken up the sloth family tree, overturning a longstanding consensus on how the major groups of sloths are related. (2019-06-06)
Maternal blood test is effective for Down syndrome screening in twin pregnancies
Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing, which involves analyzing fetal DNA in a maternal blood sample, is a noninvasive and highly accurate test for Down syndrome in singleton pregnancies, but its effectiveness in twin pregnancies has been unclear. (2019-06-05)
The bacteria building your baby
Australian researchers have laid to rest a longstanding controversy: is the womb sterile? (2019-06-05)
DNA from 31,000-year-old milk teeth leads to discovery of new group of ancient Siberians
Two children's milk teeth buried deep in a remote archaeological site in north eastern Siberia have revealed a previously unknown group of people lived there during the last Ice Age. (2019-06-05)
Ancient DNA sheds light on Arctic hunter-gatherer migration to North America ~5,000 years ago
New research reveals the profound impact of Arctic hunter-gathers who moved from Siberia to North America about 5,000 years ago on present-day Native Americans. (2019-06-05)
Gene-edited chicken cells resist bird flu virus in the lab
Scientists have used gene-editing techniques to stop the bird flu virus from spreading in chicken cells grown in the lab. (2019-06-04)
Gene mutation evolved to cope with modern high-sugar diets
A common gene mutation helps people cope with modern diets by keeping blood sugar low, but close to half of people still have an older variant that may be better suited to prehistoric diets, finds a new UCL-led study. (2019-06-04)
New genes out of nothing
One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. (2019-06-04)
Scientists crack origin of the Persian walnut
Prized worldwide for its high-quality wood and rich flavor of delicious nuts, the Persian walnut (Juglans regia) is an important economic crop. (2019-06-04)
An effective sweeper closes DNA replication cycling
IBS scientists reported a novel molecular mechanism for the regulation of PCNA cycling during DNA replication. (2019-06-03)
Study delivers insight into possible origins of immunological memory
Natural killer cells are part of the innate immune system. (2019-06-03)
Research overcomes key obstacles to scaling up DNA data storage
Researchers have developed new techniques for labeling and retrieving data files in DNA-based information storage systems, addressing two of the key obstacles to widespread adoption of DNA data storage technologies. (2019-06-03)
Sponges collect penguin, seal, and fish DNA from the water they filter
Just like humans leave DNA in the places we inhabit, water-dwelling animals leave DNA behind in the water column. (2019-06-03)
A treasure map to understanding the epigenetic causes of disease
Researchers have identified special regions of the genome where a blood sample can be used to infer epigenetic regulation throughout the body, allowing scientists to test for epigenetic causes of disease. (2019-06-02)
DNA origami to scale-up molecular motors
Researchers have successfully used DNA origami to make smooth-muscle-like contractions in large networks of molecular motor systems, a discovery which could be applied in molecular robotics. (2019-05-31)
In hot pursuit of dinosaurs: Tracking extinct species on ancient Earth via biogeography
One researcher at UTokyo is in hot pursuit of dinosaurs, tracking extinct species around ancient Earth. (2019-05-31)
DNA tests for patients move closer with genome analysis advance
Diseases caused by genetic changes could be detected more readily thanks to an advance in DNA analysis software developed by experts at the University of Edinburgh and the European Bioinformatics Institute at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. (2019-05-30)
A new mechanism for accessing damaged DNA
UV light damages the DNA of skin cells, which can lead to cancer. (2019-05-30)
Multi-step spread of first herders into sub-Saharan Africa
An analysis of 41 ancient African genomes led by Mary Prendergast and David Reich suggests that the spread of herding and farming into eastern Africa affected human populations in phases, involving multiple movements of -- and gene flow among -- ancestrally distinct groups. (2019-05-30)
Ancient DNA tells the story of the first herders and farmers in east Africa
A collaborative study led by archaeologists, geneticists and museum curators is providing answers to previously unsolved questions about life in sub-Saharan Africa thousands of years ago. (2019-05-30)
Ancient DNA illuminates first herders and farmers in east Africa
Genome-wide analyses of 41 ancient sub-Saharan Africans answer questions left murky by archaeological records about the origins of the people who introduced food production -- first herding and then farming -- into East Africa over the past 5,000 years. (2019-05-30)
Self-healing DNA nanostructures
DNA assembled into nanostructures such as tubes and origami-inspired shapes could someday find applications ranging from DNA computers to nanomedicine. (2019-05-29)
Researchers explore the epigenetics of daytime sleepiness
A new, multi-ethnic study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital explores associations between daytime sleepiness and epigenetic modifications -- measurable, chemical changes that may be influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. (2019-05-29)
Research reveals the link between primate knuckles and hand use
Research carried out by the University of Kent has found differences between the knuckle joints of primates that will enable a better understanding of ancient human hand use. (2019-05-29)
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