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Current Ancient dna News and Events

Current Ancient dna News and Events, Ancient dna News Articles.
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DNA is held together by hydrophobic forces
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, disprove the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself. (2019-09-23)
Why are mountains so high?
Stanford researchers have analyzed mountain ranges worldwide to show that a theory relating erosion and mountain height doesn't always add up. (2019-09-23)
Croc-like carnivores terrorised Triassic dinosaurs in southern Africa 210 million years ago
Giant, predatory croc-like animals that lived during the Triassic period in southern Africa preyed on early dinosaurs and mammal relatives 210 million years ago. (2019-09-23)
Mummy study: Heart disease was bigger issue for human ancestors than initially thought
A new imaging study of the mummified arteries of people who lived thousands of years ago revealed that their arteries were more clogged than originally thought, according to a proof-of-concept study led by a researcher with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2019-09-23)
Why the lettuce mitochondrial genome is like a chopped salad
The genomes of mitochondria are usually depicted as rings or circles. (2019-09-20)
First glimpse at what ancient Denisovans may have looked like, using DNA methylation data
Exactly what our ancient Denisovan relatives might have looked like had been anyone's guess for a simple reason: the entire collection of Denisovan remains includes a pinky bone, three teeth, and a lower jaw. (2019-09-19)
Key similarities discovered between human and archaea chromosomes
A study led by Indiana University is the first to reveal key similarities between chromosomes in humans and archaea. (2019-09-19)
Long lost human relative unveiled
Many people are familiar with the existence of Neanderthals, the humanoid species that was a precursor to modern humans, but far less is known Denisovans, a similar group that were contemporaries to the Neanderthals and who died out approximately 50,000 years ago. (2019-09-19)
Scientists develop DNA microcapsules with built-in ion channels
A Research group led by Tokyo Tech reports a way of constructing DNA-based microcapsules that hold great promise for the development of new functional materials and devices. (2019-09-18)
DNA 'origami' takes flight in emerging field of nano machines
'DNA mechanotechnology' is a new field to engineer DNA machines that generate, transmit and sense mechanical forces at the nanoscale. (2019-09-18)
Tel Aviv University researchers discover evidence of biblical kingdom in Arava Desert
A new Tel Aviv University study provides evidence of the biblical kingdom of Edom that flourished in the Arava Desert in today's Israel and Jordan during the 12th-11th centuries BCE. (2019-09-18)
HKUST researchers unlock cancer-causing mechanism of E. coli toxin with synthetic biology approach
An inter-disciplinary team of researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) unraveled how a toxin released by Escherichia coli (E. coli) - a human gut bacteria, is connected to colorectal cancer, offering new insights to the health impact of this prevalent bacteria and facilitating future research on the prevention of this third most common cancer worldwide*. (2019-09-17)
The market in your head
When bidding in a competitive market, our brains use a special type of heuristic to adjust the price depending on the success of previous attempts to buy goods. (2019-09-17)
Scientists discover one of world's oldest bird species in Waipara, New Zealand
The ancestor of some of the largest flying birds ever has been found in Waipara, New Zealand. (2019-09-17)
Renegade genes caught red handed
Potentially dangerous genes embedded within human DNA were once thought to be locked down by helpful DNA structures called heterochromatin. (2019-09-16)
Researchers mix RNA and DNA to study how life's process began billions of years ago
RNA World is a fascinating theory, says Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, PhD, an associate professor of chemistry at Scripps Research, but it may not hold true. (2019-09-16)
Multidrug resistance: Not as recent as we thought
Researchers from Osaka University found that the ancient RND-type multidrug efflux pump AcrB from Haemophilus influenzae targets the same drugs as its more evolved counterpart from Escherichia coli, showing that multidrug resistance is an ancient trait. (2019-09-13)
Extinction of Icelandic walrus coincides with Norse settlement
An international collaboration of scientists in Iceland, Denmark and the Netherlands has for the first time used ancient DNA analyses and C14-dating to demonstrate the past existence of a unique population of Icelandic walrus that went extinct shortly after Norse settlement some 1100 years ago. (2019-09-13)
Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo
Healthy cells in our body release nano-sized bubbles that transfer genetic material such as DNA and RNA to other cells. (2019-09-13)
How new loops in DNA packaging help us make diverse antibodies
It's long been known that our immune cells mix and match bits of genetic code to make new kinds of antibodies to fight newly encountered threats. (2019-09-13)
Gene editing tool gets sharpened by WFIRM team
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have fine-tuned their delivery system to deliver a DNA editing tool to alter DNA sequences and modify gene function. (2019-09-13)
Can a DNA construction kit replace expensive antibody medication?
Researchers at KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a technique to make sheep produce new antibodies simply by injecting the DNA building blocks. (2019-09-11)
Little heaps of silver, all wrapped up
Nanoclusters are little 'heaps' of a few atoms that often have interesting optical properties and could become useful probes for imaging processes in areas such as biomedicine and diagnostics. (2019-09-11)
Early humans used tiny, flint 'surgical' tools to butcher elephants
A new Tel Aviv University-led study reveals that the early humans known as Acheulians crafted tiny flint tools out of recycled larger discarded instruments as part of a comprehensive animal-butchery tool kit. (2019-09-11)
'Game-changing' research could solve evolution mysteries
An evolution revolution has begun after scientists extracted genetic information from a 1.7-million-year-old rhino tooth -- the largest and oldest genetic data to ever be recorded. (2019-09-11)
Ground-breaking method to reconstruct the evolution of all species
By looking into fossil teeth from almost 2 million years old rhinos, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Cambridge launch a new molecular method for studying the evolutionary history of fossil species dating back millions of years. (2019-09-11)
Scientists solve lingering mystery of poorly understood frog
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at McMaster University, has solved a centuries-old mystery of 'Fraser's Clawed Frog', an unusual and elusive species found in West Africa. (2019-09-11)
Study explores role of mediator protein complex in transcription and gene expression
A new study led by Ryerson University called 'The Med31 Conserved Component of the Divergent Mediator Complex in Tetrahymena thermophila Participates in Developmental Regulation' advances existing knowledge about transcription and gene expression. (2019-09-10)
HKU archaeological team excavates at one of the major fortress-settlements in the Armenian Highlands
A team of researchers and students from HKU unearthed huge storage jars, animal bones and fortress walls from 3,000 years ago in Armenia as they initiated the Ararat Plain Southeast Archaeological Project (APSAP) during the summer of 2019. (2019-09-10)
Researchers find earliest evidence of milk consumption
A research team, led by archaeologists at the University of York, have identified a milk protein called beta lactoglobulin (BLG) entombed in the mineralised dental plaque of seven individuals who lived in the Neolithic period around 6,000 years-ago. (2019-09-10)
Smithsonian scientists triple number of known electric eel species
South American rivers are home to at least three different species of electric eels, including a newly identified species capable of generating a greater electrical discharge than any other known animal, according to a new analysis of 107 fish collected in Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana and Suriname in recent years. (2019-09-10)
Gene coding error found in rare, inherited gene cof lung-scarring disorder linked to short telomeres
By combing through the entire genetic sequences of a person with a lung scarring disease and 13 of the person's relatives, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found a coding error in a single gene that is likely responsible for a rare form of the disease and the abnormally short protective DNA caps on chromosomes long associated with it. (2019-09-10)
Scientists identify rare evolutionary intermediates to understand the origin of eukaryotes
A new study provides a key insight into a milestone event in the early evolution of life on Earth -- the origin of the cell nucleus and complex cells. (2019-09-10)
Earliest spread of millet agriculture outside China linked to herding livestock
5000 years before the modern rise of millet as a popular grain, this Chinese crop was spread far and wide by ancient food aficionados, not for their plates but instead for their animals, suggests new research from an international collaboration led by Kiel University (Germany) and Washington University in St. (2019-09-06)
How to make a book last for millennia
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere determine the unique composition of a surface layer on the Temple Scroll, one of the best-preserved of the more than 2,000-year-old Dead Sea Scrolls, to uncover the ancient production technology. (2019-09-06)
Novel study reveals presence of fungal DNA in the fetal human gut
A recent human study published in The FASEB Journal discovered the presence of fungal communities in the fetal gut. (2019-09-05)
First ancient DNA from Indus Valley civilization links its people to modern South Asians
Researchers have successfully sequenced the first genome of an individual from the Harappan civilization, also called the Indus Valley Civilization (IVC). (2019-09-05)
Ancient DNA study tracks formation of populations across Central Asia
Ethically sourced and informed by archaeology, an ambitious new study reports genome-wide DNA information from 523 ancient humans collected at archaeological sites across the Near East and Central and South Asia. (2019-09-05)
Ancient DNA from Central and South Asia reveals movement of people and language in Eurasia
A genome-wide analysis of ancient DNA from more than 500 individuals from across South and Central Asia sheds light on the complex genetic ancestry of the region's modern people. (2019-09-05)
Largest-ever ancient-DNA study illuminates millennia of South and Central Asian prehistory
Researchers analyzed the genomes of 524 never before-studied ancient people, including the first genome of an individual from the ancient Indus Valley Civilization. (2019-09-05)
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