Current Anemia News and Events

Current Anemia News and Events, Anemia News Articles.
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Scientists regenerate skin with stem cells to see how DNA defects in kids cause cancer
Physicians and scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center used new stem cell technology to regenerate and study living patient-specific skin in the lab, giving them a precise close up view of how inherited DNA defects cause skin damage and deadly squamous cell carcinoma in children and young adults with Fanconi anemia (FA). (2020-11-23)

Study: Malaria-preventive drugs dramatically reduce infections in school children
Use of preventive antimalarial treatments reduces by half the number of malaria infections among schoolchildren, according to a new analysis published today in The Lancet Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Critically ill infants given blood transfusions before surgery have poorer outcomes
Critically ill newborns who receive blood transfusions prior to surgery had about a 50% increased rate of complications or death than those who did not receive transfusions, according to a new study published today in Pediatrics by Nemours Children's Health System researchers. The findings demonstrate the potential danger that blood transfusions may have on the surgical outcomes of neonatal patients. (2020-10-21)

UT Southwestern leads national efforts around childhood blood disorders
When a child has a rare blood disorder, clinicians can struggle to find the best diagnostic and treatment methods. New research led by UT Southwestern shows the effectiveness of a treatment for aplastic anemia and reveals the range of diagnosis and treatment options used by hospitals around the country for a related disease - myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). (2020-10-15)

UM171 saves another life
Developed in Canada, the UM171 molecule was used in a blood transplant by a Montreal medical team on a young man suffering from severe aplastic anemia, an autoimmune disease. (2020-09-30)

AGA recommends bidirectional endoscopy for most patients with iron deficiency anemia
The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published new clinical guidelines outlining an evidence-based approach for the initial gastrointestinal evaluation of chronic iron deficiency anemia in asymptomatic patients. Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common worldwide, and a gastrointestinal cause should be considered in all patients without an obvious cause for their anemia. (2020-09-01)

Study explores the association of malaria, HIV with anemia during pregnancy
Pregnant women from sub-Saharan Africa with malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a higher prevalence of anemia than pregnant women without infections, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The findings may have implications for reducing the risk of death in pregnant women and preventing low birth weights and neurocognitive impairment in their children as a result of anemia. (2020-08-14)

Researchers find best way to treat children with sickle cell anemia in sub-Saharan Africa
A team of international researchers has learned that dose escalation of hydroxyurea treatment for children in Uganda with sickle cell anemia is more effective and has similar side effects than a lower fixed dose of the same drug. (2020-06-25)

Researchers discover improved treatment for children with sickle cell anemia
A team of international researchers has learned that dose escalation of hydroxyurea treatment for children in Uganda with sickle cell anemia is more effective and has similar side effects than a lower fixed dose of the same drug. (2020-06-25)

Novel targeted drug induced positive response for VHL-associated kidney cancer
In an international trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, treatment with MK-6482, the small molecule inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2a was well tolerated and resulted in clinical responses for patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC). (2020-05-28)

New mobile health tool measures hemoglobin without drawing blood
Researchers have developed a way to use smartphone images of a person's eyelids to assess blood hemoglobin levels. The ability to perform one of the most common clinical lab tests without a blood draw could help reduce the need for in-person clinic visits, make it easier to monitor patients who are in critical condition, and improve care in low- and middle-income countries where access to testing laboratories is limited. (2020-05-21)

At the crossroads
In the bone marrow, blood stem cells via precursor cells give rise to a variety of blood cell types with various functions: white blood cells, red blood cells, or blood platelets. In which cell type a cell develops depends on various factors. The correct dosage of the enzyme MOF at the right time triggers developmental programs in blood stem cells and precursor cells, and the cells differentiate into red blood cells. (2020-05-20)

New MDS subtype proposed based on presence of genetic mutation
In a special report published today in the journal Blood, an international working group of experts in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) proposes -- for the first time -- the recognition of a distinct subtype of MDS based on the presence of a nonheritable genetic mutation that causes the disease. The mutation is found in approximately one in every five patients with MDS. (2020-04-29)

A diet of high-iron beans improves health of anemic women in Rwanda
A new study involving women of reproductive age in Rwanda, where 19% of that demographic is anemic, showed that a diet including high-iron beans can improve iron status and physical performance relatively quickly. (2020-04-29)

High-altitude adaptations connected with lower risk for chronic diseases
High-altitude adaptations in the Himalayas may lower risk for some chronic diseases, according to a research team including faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York, the University of New Mexico, and the Fudan University School of Life Sciences. (2020-04-23)

Clinicians should consider screening for TSH-R-Abs before pregnancy in patients with history of autoimmune thyroid disorders
Clinicians should consider screening for thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TSH-R-Abs) before pregnancy when the patient has a history of autoimmune thyroid disease or a history of radioactive iodine treatment or thyroidectomy. This is important because Graves' disease, an autoimmune disease caused by TSH-R-Abs, or its treatment, can lead to irreversible impairment in fetal neurodevelopment. A case report is published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-03-23)

Passport tagging for express cargo transportation in cells
The collaborative research groups identified a 10-amino acid sequence, which is built in blood coagulation factors, that is specifically recognized as a passport for their intracellular transportation in the secretory pathway. They also found that production of recombinant glycoproteins as biopharmaceuticals can be enhanced by tagging them with this molecular passport. (2020-03-17)

Research shows the way to more efficient EPO production
EPO, an important drug for treating anemia, can now be produced in higher quantities and with better quality in mammalian cells designed using CRISPR. (2020-02-19)

Geography, age and anemia shape childhood vaccine responses in Sub-Saharan Africa
Vaccine responses in the developing immune systems of children may depend on factors such as age, location and anemia status, according to a study comparing samples from 1,119 Dutch children to 171 children in sub-Saharan Africa who took part in a malaria vaccine trial. (2020-02-06)

Scurvy is still a thing in Canada
McMaster University researchers surveyed the data of patients of Hamilton's two hospital systems over nine years and found 52 with low Vitamin C levels. This included 13 patients who could be diagnosed as having scurvy, and an additional 39 who tested positive for scurvy but did not have documented symptoms. (2020-01-17)

New technology allows control of gene therapy doses
Scientists at Scripps Research in Jupiter have developed a special molecular switch that could be embedded into gene therapies to allow doctors to control dosing. The feat, reported in the scientific journal Nature Biotechnology, offers gene therapy designers what may be the first viable technique for adjusting the activity levels of their therapeutic genes. (2019-12-24)

Protective microparticles shield and deliver micronutrients to people
A team of scientists has created a new microparticle-based platform that can preserve, protect and deliver micronutrients such as iron to rodents and human volunteers. (2019-11-13)

Many teens have low iron, B12 levels years after bariatric surgery
Five years after bariatric surgery, many teens develop nutritional deficiencies, according to new research from Cincinnati Children's. Experts say one of the two main types of procedures poses fewer complications for teens. (2019-11-08)

Program improves short term nutritional outcomes in a conflict zone
A study led by a researcher at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health finds that a multidisciplinary program within a conflict zone in Armenia was successful in improving several measures of childhood nutrition. Results appear in the journal Public Health Nutrition. (2019-11-07)

As large chains grow to dominate dialysis, patient outcomes decline
As large, for-profit dialysis chains acquired more than 1,200 smaller providers across the U.S. from 1998 to 2010, they cut skilled medical staff, increased patient volumes, altered drug regimens and adopted other practices that hurt patient health, according to new research from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business. (2019-10-23)

Women with anemia twice as likely to need transfusion after cesarean delivery
Pregnant women with anemia are twice as likely to need blood transfusions after a cesarean delivery, as those without the condition, according to a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. Yet most pregnant women aren't screened early in their pregnancy for iron deficiency, which can lead to anemia. (2019-10-21)

Early maternal anemia tied to intellectual disability, ADHD and autism
The timing of anemia -- a common condition in late pregnancy -- can make a big difference for the developing fetus, according to research at Karolinska Institutet published in JAMA Psychiatry. The researchers found a link between early anemia and increased risk of autism, ADHD and intellectual disability in children. Anemia discovered toward the end of pregnancy did not have the same correlation. The findings underscore the importance of early screening for iron status and nutritional counselling. (2019-09-18)

Study examines association between prenatal anemia, neurodevelopmental disorders in children
Data on 500,000 children born in Sweden were used to examine the association between mothers with anemia during pregnancy and the risk of children being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability. (2019-09-18)

Study finds toolkit could improve detection and management of iron deficiency in pregnancy
Iron deficiency in pregnancy is a common problem that often goes unrecognized and untreated due to a lack of knowledge of its implications and competing clinical priorities. To enhance screening and management of iron deficiency in pregnancy, a research team at Toronto's St. Michael's Hospital developed a quality improvement toolkit, called IRON MOM. The implementation of IRON MOM resulted in increased rates of ferritin testing and decreased rates of anemia at St. Michael's obstetric clinics. (2019-08-20)

Age-related illness risk for people living with HIV
The first large-scale review into the health outcomes of people living with HIV has found that this group has an increased risk of contracting specific diseases and illnesses, some of which are more commonly associated with ageing. (2019-08-15)

Of mice and babies: New mouse model links transfusions to deadly infant digestive disease
Physicians have long suspected that red blood cell transfusions given to premature infants with anemia may put them in danger of developing a potentially lethal inflammatory disease of the intestines. (2019-08-12)

Both low and high levels of hemoglobin linked to increased risk of dementia
Having either low or high levels of hemoglobin in your blood may be linked to an increased risk of developing dementia years later, according to a study published in the July 31, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-07-31)

Are you sure it's burning mouth syndrome?
Not all burning mouths are the result of a medical condition known as 'burning mouth syndrome' (BMS) and physicians and researchers need better standards for an appropriate diagnosis, according to new research at the School of Dental Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. (2019-07-03)

UH researcher reports the way sickle cells form may be key to stopping them
University of Houston chemist Vassiliy Lubchenko is reporting a new finding in Nature Communications on how sickle cells are formed, which may lead not only to stopping their formation, but to new avenues for making uniformly-sized nanoparticles for industry. (2019-07-02)

Study finds micronutrient deficiencies common at time of celiac disease diagnosis
Micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins B12 and D, as well as folate, iron, zinc and copper, are common in adults at the time of diagnosis with celiac disease. These deficiencies should be addressed at that time, according to a study by Mayo Clinic researchers. (2019-06-24)

Sickle cell disease needs more attention
Article signed by researchers affiliated with institutions in the US, UK, Ghana and Brazil highlights recent progress in diagnosis and treatment but warns that more screening of newborns is needed. (2019-06-12)

WVU researcher studies incurable blood disease usually diagnosed in children
Most people with Fanconi anemia are diagnosed before they turn 12 but don't live past 30. Wei Du -- a researcher in the WVU School of Pharmacy and the WVU Cancer Institute -- is exploring the metabolic processes the underlie this form of anemia. Her findings may lead to new gene therapies that help patients live better, longer. (2019-05-13)

Estimates of illness, death among children, adolescents worldwide
This study analyzed data from around the world to estimate illness and death in children and adolescents (birth up to age 20) in 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2017. Mortality decreased over the 27-year period and that meant children and adolescents were more likely to reach their 20th birthdays. (2019-04-29)

New research suggests earlier emergence of malaria in Africa
After carrying out extensive research into the ╬▓S mutation by performing full sequencing of the HBB gene together with a large-scale genomic study on 479 individuals from 13 populations from Sub-Saharan Africa, scientists were able to reveal that malaria emerged in Africa at least 20,000 years ago - and not at the same time as the adoption of agriculture 4,000 to 5,000 years ago. (2019-02-28)

Study: Adolescent female blood donors at risk for iron deficiency and associated anemia
Female adolescent blood donors are more likely to have low iron stores and iron deficiency anemia than adult female blood donors and nondonors, which could have significant negative consequences on their developing brains, a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests. (2019-02-19)

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