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Current Anesthesia News and Events

Current Anesthesia News and Events, Anesthesia News Articles.
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Light-based strategy effectively treats carbon monoxide poisoning in rats
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital recently developed a phototherapy strategy that was highly effective for removing carbon monoxide in rats. (2019-10-10)
Building a brighter way for capturing cancer during surgery
Bioengineer's smart surgical microscope shows promise for more accurately and quickly identifying cancer cells in the operating room. (2019-09-30)
Is this brain cell your 'mind's eye'?
No-one knows what connects awareness -- the state of consciousness -- with its contents, i.e. thoughts and experiences. (2019-09-30)
New findings enable more heart donations
There is a risk of every fourth heart examined for possible donation being dismissed as unusable due to stress-induced heart failure. (2019-09-26)
CU researchers: Fast MRIs offer alternative to CT scans for pediatric head injuries
Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have released a study that shows that a new imaging method 'fast MRI' is effective in identifying traumatic brain injuries in children, and can avoid exposure to ionizing radiation and anesthesia. (2019-09-18)
Is headache from anesthesia after childbirth associated with risk of bleeding around brain?
This study examined whether postpartum women with headache from anesthesia after neuraxial anesthesia (such as epidural) during childbirth had increased risk of being diagnosed with bleeding around the brain (intracranial subdural hematoma). (2019-09-16)
Radiation therapy effective against deadly heart rhythm
A single high dose of radiation aimed at the heart significantly reduces episodes of a potentially deadly rapid heart rhythm, according to results of a phase one/two study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-09-16)
FASEB Journal: Anesthetic drug sevoflurane improves sepsis outcomes, animal study reveals
Patients with sepsis often require surgery or imaging procedures under general anesthesia, yet there is no standard regimen for anesthetizing septic patients. (2019-09-12)
Chewing gum use in the perioperative period
Many anesthesiologists forbid patients from chewing gum in the immediate hours before surgery for fear that it would increase the risk that the patient's stomach contents might end up dumped (aspirated) into the patient's lungs, with potentially deadly consequences (aspiration pneumonitis). (2019-08-30)
Music can be a viable alternative to medications in reducing anxiety before anesthesia
Music is a viable alternative to sedative medications in reducing patient anxiety prior to a peripheral nerve block procedure, according to a new Penn Medicine study. (2019-07-19)
Music may offer alternative to preoperative drug routinely used to calm nerves
Music may offer an alternative to the use of a drug routinely used to calm the nerves before the use of regional anaesthesia (peripheral nerve block), suggest the results of a clinical trial, published online in the journal Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine. (2019-07-18)
Surgery before pregnancy linked to increased risk of opioid withdrawal in babies
Babies whose mothers underwent surgery before pregnancy had an increased risk of opioid withdrawal symptoms at birth, found a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-07-15)
Surgery before pregnancy linked to higher risk of opioid withdrawal in babies
Babies whose mothers underwent surgery before pregnancy have an increased risk of opioid withdrawal symptoms at birth, according to a new study done by Dr. (2019-07-15)
Combined breast and gynecologic surgery: Study says not so fast
University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in Breast Journal argues against combined approach: Patients undergoing coordinated breast and gynecologic procedures had a significantly longer length of hospital stay, and higher complication, readmission, and reoperation rates compared with patients who underwent single site surgery. (2019-07-15)
NIH scientists identify spasm in women with endometriosis-associated chronic pelvic pain
Pelvic pain associated with endometriosis often becomes chronic and can persist (or recur) following surgical and hormonal interventions. (2019-07-11)
In cases when patients under anesthesia experience anaphylaxis, hyperactive immune...
A study of 86 patients reveals how drugs used for anesthesia can induce life-threatening anaphylaxis (a dangerous type of allergic reaction) through an alternative immune pathway. (2019-07-10)
Preoperative management of inflammation may stave off cancer recurrences
A new study out of the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests that that traditional cancer treatments can paradoxically promote new tumor growth. (2019-06-18)
Lower-amp ECT appears effective against suicidal thoughts
Nearly half the amplitude typically used in standard electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) seems to be effective at treating suicidal thoughts, investigators report. (2019-06-03)
Towards a new era of small animal imaging research
Thanks to a collaborative effort between McGill University, Montreal Canada and the University of Antwerp, Belgium this no longer needs to be the case. (2019-05-30)
Columbia researchers examine how our brain generates consciousness -- and loses it
In a first of its kind study, researchers from Columbia's Rafael Yuste's Laboratory used cellular resolution in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in mice to investigate changes in the local repertoire of neuronal micro states during anesthesia. (2019-05-01)
General anesthesia hijacks sleep circuitry to knock you out
In a study published online April 18 in Neuron, researchers found that general anesthesia induces unconsciousness by hijacking the neural circuitry that makes us fall sleep. (2019-04-18)
Regular cannabis users require up to 220% higher dosage for sedation in medical procedures
Researchers in Colorado examined medical records of 250 patients who received endoscopic procedures after 2012, when the state legalized recreational cannabis. (2019-04-15)
Anesthesia sends neurons down the wrong path in unborn rat babies
A study in Cerebral Cortex provides new insight into why -- and when -- anesthesia during pregnancy harms unborn brains. (2019-04-11)
Awake lumbar interbody fusion
This article provides the reader with a glimpse of how effective lumbar surgery in select patients can be when performed without general anesthesia, open surgery, or a long convalescence in the hospital. (2019-04-01)
Researchers discover a critical receptor involved in response to antidepressants like ketamine
Effective treatment of clinical depression remains a major mental health issue, with roughly 30 percent of patients who do not respond to any of the available treatments. (2019-03-28)
Not all sleep is equal when it comes to cleaning the brain
New research shows how the depth of sleep can impact our brain's ability to efficiently wash away waste and toxic proteins. (2019-02-27)
Insomnia-associated gene regions suggest underlying mechanisms, treatment targets
An international research team led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Exeter Medical School has identified 57 gene regions associated with symptoms of insomnia. (2019-02-25)
Study finds acetaminophen significantly reduced in-hospital delirium
Patients treated with acetaminophen demonstrated a significant reduction in in-hospital delirium. (2019-02-19)
Brain patterns indicative of consciousness, in unconscious individuals
Amid longstanding difficulties distinguishing consciousness in humans in unconscious states, scientists report fMRI-based evidence of distinct patterns of brain activity they say can differentiate between consciousness or unconsciousness. (2019-02-06)
Less anesthesia during surgery doesn't prevent post-op delirium
One in four older adults experiences delirium after surgery. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-02-05)
Smartphone software detects early signs of opioid overdoses
A new software system for smartphones can quickly and unobtrusively detect early signs of opioid overdoses, according to a new study. (2019-01-09)
Research finds opioids may help chronic pain, a little
In a study published today by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), McMaster University researchers reviewed 96 clinical trials with more than 26,000 participants and found opioids provide only small improvements in pain, physical functioning and sleep quality compared to a placebo. (2018-12-18)
Impairment rating of injured workers depends on the when and where of assessment
A comparison of a group of injured workers assessed using the two most recent editions of the AMA guides revealed that usage of the sixth edition resulted in significantly lower impairment ratings than the fifth edition. (2018-12-13)
New guidance outlines recommendations for infection control in anesthesiology
The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America has issued a new expert guidance on how hospitals and healthcare providers may reduce infections associated with anesthesiology procedures and equipment in the operating room. (2018-12-11)
Was general anesthesia for surgery associated with risk of adverse child development in study of siblings?
Surgery under general anesthesia for young children before they started elementary school wasn't associated with increased risk of adverse child development outcomes compared with their biological siblings who didn't have surgery and after accounting for other potential biological and environmental factors. The study of children in Ontario, Canada, included 2,346 sibling pairs where only one sibling had surgery. (2018-11-05)
Experts recommend new way to describe cognitive changes after anesthesia, surgery in elderly patient
A multidisciplinary, international group of experts has recommended changing the way clinicians and patients describe cognitive changes experienced in some patients after anesthesia and surgery. (2018-10-16)
Delayed pushing appears to have no effect on chances for spontaneous vaginal delivery
Delaying pushing during the second stage of labor -- when the cervix is fully dilated at 10 centimeters -- is a common practice at many US hospitals, but it may have no effect on whether pregnant women deliver spontaneously (without a cesarean section or other intervention), according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2018-10-09)
Focus on neuroscience, nociception to improve anesthesia, paper says
By focusing on nervous system circuits of nociception, the body's sensing of tissue damge, anesthesiologists can achieve unconsciousness in patients using less drug and manage post-operative pain better, leading to less need for opioids. (2018-10-01)
Results from the SOLVE-TAVI trial reported at TCT 2018
The first randomized study to compare general versus local anesthesia during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with intermediate to high surgical risk found local anesthesia to be both safe and effective. (2018-09-23)
Zebrafish research highlights role of locus coeruleus in anesthesia
Recently, researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and Zunyi Medical College, by using a larval zebrafish model, revealed that two commonly used intravenous anesthetic drugs, propofol and etomidate, suppress the excitability of locus coeruleus neurons via synergic mechanisms -- thus inhibiting presynaptic excitatory inputs and inducing membrane hyperpolarization of these cells. (2018-09-18)
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