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Current Animal testing News and Events

Current Animal testing News and Events, Animal testing News Articles.
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Social influencers: What can we learn from animals?
Research from Oxford University calls us to reconsider how behaviors may spread through societies of wild animals, and how this might provide new insights into human social networks. (2019-12-03)
CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing shows very low risk of mistakes
Along with the promise that CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology can offer new human therapies is the need to ensure its safety. (2019-12-03)
Half of all women with HIV are diagnosed late in Europe
Many women in the WHO European Region, particularly those in their 40s, are diagnosed at a late stage of HIV infection when their immune system is already starting to fail. (2019-11-28)
Researchers say animal-like embryos preceded animal appearance
Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors before diversifying into 30-40 distinct anatomical designs. (2019-11-27)
The difference between an expert's brain and a novice's
In learning new tasks, neuron networks in the brain of mice become more refined and selective. (2019-11-18)
Relevant social stimuli may reduce interest in drugs
Researchers of the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Malaga (UMA), specialized in addictive disorders, have demonstrated in an animal model that the presence of a relevant social stimulus reduces interest in cocaine. (2019-11-15)
Body language key to zoo animal welfare
Watching the behavior and body language of zoo animals could be the key to understanding and improving their welfare, new research suggests. (2019-11-13)
Biology: Artic sea ice loss may facilitate disease spread in marine mammals
Artic sea ice reduction due to climate change may allow pathogens infecting sea mammals to spread more regularly between the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2019-11-07)
Horses blink less, twitch eyelids more when stressed
A horse will blink less and twitch its eyelids more when it's under mild stress, the research team found -- a new finding that could offer handlers a simple, easy-to-spot sign their animal is becoming agitated. (2019-11-06)
Liver-chip predicts the toxicity of drug candidates across species
Researchers have created a 'Liver-Chip' using Organs-on-Chips technology that can predict and characterize the liver toxicity of various drug candidates and compounds in rats, dogs, and humans. (2019-11-06)
Liver-chip identifies drug toxicities in human, rat, and dog models
Liver toxicity is a big problem in the drug, food, and consumer products industries, especially because results in animal models fail to predict how chemicals will affect humans. (2019-11-06)
One in four oncologists fails to mention cost when discussing genomic testing
Nearly one in four oncologists discussing genomic testing with their patients rarely or never discusses the costs of testing, according to a new study led by American Cancer Society investigators. (2019-11-01)
Chromosomal abnormalities uncovered in many couples struggling with recurrent miscarriage
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Shandong University and the Chinese University of Hong Kong uses a special genetic sequencing technique known as low-pass genome sequencing (GS) to look for chromosomal abnormalities in couples with RM. (2019-10-31)
Scientists invent animal-free testing of lethal neurotoxins
Animal testing will no longer be required to assess a group of deadly neurotoxins, thanks to University of Queensland-led research. (2019-10-29)
Testing HIV testers
An innovative study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) used a youth-driven mystery shopper methodology to assess YMSM's testing experiences in three metropolitan cities highly impacted by the HIV epidemic. (2019-10-29)
Financial incentives plus information decrease patient preference for diagnostic testing
Providing financial incentives to forego testing significantly decreases patient preference for testing, even when accounting for test benefit and risk. (2019-10-28)
UK vets need special training to report suspected animal abuse
UK vets need special training to report cases of suspected animal abuse and neglect, finds research published online in Vet Record. (2019-10-28)
Researchers identify improved avenues to train plastic surgeons in microsurgery
Microsurgery is an intricate and challenging surgical technique that involves using miniature instruments and sutures as fine as a hair strand aided by sophisticated microscopes. (2019-10-25)
Are humans changing animal genetic diversity worldwide?
Human population density and land use is causing changes in animal genetic diversity, according to researchers at McGill University. (2019-10-22)
New test assists physicians with quicker treatment decisions for sepsis
A new test to determine whether antibiotics will be effective against certain bacterial infections is helping physicians make faster and better prescription treatment choices. (2019-10-03)
Collaboration may improve access to HIV testing, primary care
Getting better access to testing and proper primary care for individuals vulnerable to HIV could be as simple as a telephone call or email among health providers. (2019-10-01)
Is this brain cell your 'mind's eye'?
No-one knows what connects awareness -- the state of consciousness -- with its contents, i.e. thoughts and experiences. (2019-09-30)
Crappy news for the dung beetle and those who depend on them
You mightn't think that the life of a dung beetle, a creature who eats poop every day of its short life, could get any worse, but you'd be wrong. (2019-09-24)
Shocking embryonic limbs into shape
In a new study published in EPJ E, Vincent Fleury and Ameya Vaishnavi Murukutla from Universite Paris Diderot, Paris, France use the stimulation of chicken embryos with electric shocks to propose a mechanism for vertebrate limb formation. (2019-09-20)
Global trends in antimicrobial resistance of farm animals
From 2000 to 2018, the proportion of pathogens that infect farmyard chickens and pigs and that are also significantly resistant to antibiotics grew, a new study shows. (2019-09-19)
Pros and cons of genetic scissors
Crispr technology has greatly facilitated gene editing. Associate Professor Thorsten Müller from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Dr. (2019-09-17)
Study gives clues to the origin of Huntington's disease, and a new way to find drugs
Using a new technique to study brain development, scientists were able to trace the causes of Huntington's back to early developmental stages when the brain has only just begun to form. (2019-09-17)
A promising treatment for an incurable, deadly kidney disease
A potential treatment for polycystic kidney disease -- a genetic disorder that causes the kidneys to swell with multiple cysts and can eventually lead to organ failure -- has shown promising results in animal testing. (2019-09-12)
Papillomaviruses may be able to be spread by blood
Researchers found that rabbit and mouse papillomaviruses could be transferred by blood to their respective hosts, raising the possibility that human papillomavirus (HPV) may also be transferable by blood in humans. (2019-09-11)
EPA announces plan to end required animal tests for chemical safety testing
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler announced today that animal testing to assess the safety of products under EPA's authority will be substantially reduced in 6 years and phased out by 2035. (2019-09-10)
Ancient animal species: Fossils dating back 550 million years among first animal trails
Shuhai Xiao, a professor of geosciences, calls the unearthed fossils, including the bodies and trails left by an ancient animal species, the most convincing sign of ancient animal mobility, dating back about 550 million years. (2019-09-04)
Death march of segmented animal unravels critical evolutionary puzzle
The death march of a segmented bilaterian animal unearthed from ~550-million-year-old rocks in China shows that the oldest mobile and segmented animals evolved by the Ediacaran Period (635-539 million years ago). (2019-09-04)
Animal ethics and animal behavioral science -- bridging the gap
Animal ethics is an emerging concern across many disciplines. In an article in BioScience, an interdisciplinary group of scholars urges that this issue be taken up actively by animal behavior scientists. (2019-08-28)
Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds
Researchers from EPFL and the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands have developed an extremely fast optical method for sculpting complex shapes in stem-cell-laden hydrogels and then vascularizing the resulting tissue. (2019-08-23)
Scaling up a nanoimmunotherapy for atherosclerosis through preclinical testing
By integrating translational imaging techniques with improvements to production methods, Tina Binderup and colleagues have scaled up a promising nanoimmunotherapy for atherosclerosis in mice, rabbits and pigs -- surmounting a major obstacle in nanomedicine. (2019-08-21)
Inherited pancreatic cancer risk mutation identified
The discovery of the previously unknown mutation, reported in Nature Genetics by investigators from Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, could lead to routine testing of individuals with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer to determine if they carry the mutation, occurring in the gene known as RABL3. (2019-08-12)
Data analysis tool to help scientists make sense of mouse's calls
Technology that can help interpret inaudible calls from laboratory mice has been developed in a bid to improve research. (2019-08-08)
New research provides better way to gauge pain in mice
Rutgers University-Camden neuroscientist Nathan Fried and colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania have developed a method that can more accurately gauge pain in mice, which could lead researchers to discover new ways to treat pain in human patients. (2019-08-07)
Permian lizard-like animal suffered from a bone condition similar to Paget's disease
A lizard-like animal that lived 289 million years ago suffered from a bone condition similar to Paget's disease, according to a study published Aug. (2019-08-07)
Asbestosis toxicity study identifies potential of novel mineral treatment
Scientists investigating the ability of a micronized mineral compound to counteract the carcinogenic effects of mesothelioma and asbestosis, say results from both cell culture and animal model studies are very promising, warranting further investigation, including the commencement of clinical trials. (2019-08-06)
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