Nav: Home

Current Annoying residue News and Events

Current Annoying residue News and Events, Annoying residue News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 15 | 571 Results
Subtle changes, big effects
According to the chaos theory in mathematics, a minute change such as the 'flap of a butterfly's wing' could cause huge changes elsewhere. (2019-11-18)
Getting glued in the sea
New bio-inspired hydrogels can act like superglue in highly ionic environments such as seawater, overcoming issues in currently available marine adhesives. (2019-11-12)
Sounds of mosquito mating rituals could lead to quieter drones
Mosquitoes flap their wings not just to stay aloft but for two other critical purposes: to generate sound and to point that buzz in the direction of a potential mate, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered. (2019-11-07)
Adhesive which debonds in magnetic field could reduce landfill waste
Researchers at the University of Sussex have developed a glue which can unstick when placed in a magnetic field, meaning products otherwise destined for landfill, could now be dismantled and recycled at the end of their life. (2019-11-04)
Composite metal foam outperforms aluminum for use in aircraft wings
The leading edges of aircraft wings have to meet a very demanding set of characteristics. (2019-10-21)
Happy, angry or neutral expressions? Eyes react just as fast
Dr Louisa Kulke from the University of Göttingen has investigated how our eyes and brain react when we see emotionally charged or neutral faces. (2019-10-14)
Pesticide companies leverage regulations for financial gains
Some pesticide companies may put profit ahead of protecting the public from potential harms. (2019-10-08)
Turning up the heat for weed control
Research determines optimal heat conditions for weed seed control in Louisiana sugarcane fields (2019-09-25)
Over one-fifth of injured US adult cyclists were not wearing a helmet -- new study
Men and ethnic minorities are less likely to wear cycle helmets and more likely to suffer from head and neck injuries in accidents, according to new research published in Brain Injury. (2019-09-13)
Early humans used tiny, flint 'surgical' tools to butcher elephants
A new Tel Aviv University-led study reveals that the early humans known as Acheulians crafted tiny flint tools out of recycled larger discarded instruments as part of a comprehensive animal-butchery tool kit. (2019-09-11)
Mechanism of epilepsy causing membrane protein is discovered
The team lead by Dr. Lim Hyun-Ho of Korea Brain Research Institute published its paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2019-08-29)
Wild ground-nesting bees might be exposed to lethal levels of neonics in soil
In a first-ever study investigating the risk of neonicotinoid insecticides to ground-nesting bees, University of Guelph researchers have discovered hoary squash bees are being exposed to lethal levels of the chemicals in the soil. (2019-08-26)
How the herring adapted to the light environment in the Baltic Sea
An international team of scientists, led by researchers from Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, reports that a single amino acid change in the light-sensing rhodopsin protein played a critical role when herring adapted to the red-shifted light environment in the Baltic Sea. (2019-08-26)
Microplastic drifting down with the snow
Over the past several years, microplastic particles have repeatedly been detected in sea-water, drinking water, and even in animals. (2019-08-14)
High-energy lasers could be used to treat Alzheimer's disease in the future
The aggregation of amyloid protein fibrils is involved in diseases such as amyloidosis and even Alzheimer's. (2019-08-08)
Overturning the truth on conservation tillage
Conservation tillage does not lower yield in modern cropping systems. (2019-07-31)
Whole-tree harvesting could boost biomass production
Making the shift to renewable energy sources requires biomass, too. (2019-07-29)
Carbon nanotube tape stays sticky in extreme temperatures
In very hot or cold environments, conventional tape can lose its stickiness and leave behind an annoying residue. (2019-07-10)
Deep learning-powered 'DeepEC' helps accurately understand enzyme functions
A deep learning-powered computational framework, 'DeepEC,' will allow the high-quality and high-throughput prediction of enzyme commission numbers, which is essential for the accurate understanding of enzyme functions. (2019-07-09)
What makes a good excuse work? A Cambridge philosopher may have the answer
The things we appeal to when making excuses are myriad: tiredness, stress, a looming work deadline, a wailing infant. (2019-06-30)
Methylmercury precipitates heart failure by increasing Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission
Researchers from National Institute for Physiological Sciences revealed the molecular mechanism underlying increase the risk of heart failure during hemodynamic load by methylmercury exposure. (2019-06-25)
A forest of nano-mushroom structures keep this plastic clean and stain-free
Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have created a flexible optical plastic that is stain-resistant and superomniphobic, finding inspiration in a surprising place: the shape of Enoki mushrooms. (2019-06-19)
Ancient pots from Chinese tombs reveal early use of cannabis as a drug
Chemical analysis of several wooden braziers recently excavated from tombs in western China provides some of earliest evidence for ritual cannabis smoking, researchers report. (2019-06-12)
Creating new molecular sieves
Molecular sieves are useful in many industrial processes, especially in the chemical and energy sectors. (2019-06-06)
3-million-year-old fossilized mouse reveals evolutionary secrets of color
This new study applied X-ray imaging to several 3-million-year-old fossils in order to untangle the story of key pigments in ancient animals and reveal how we might recognize the chemical signatures of specific red pigments in long extinct animals to determine how they evolved. (2019-05-21)
Structural and functional mechanisms of a new class of bacterial sigma/anti-sigma factors revealed
Prof. FENG Yingang and his colleagues from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently revealed the structural and functional mechanism of the SigI/RsgI factors from C. thermocellum. (2019-05-19)
Identifying the molecular structure of one of Alzheimer's stickier culprits
Researchers have mapped the molecular structure and dynamics of an aggressive protein modification that spurs on Alzheimer's disease. (2019-05-16)
Where there's waste there's fertilizer
Scientists recycle phosphorus by combining dairy and water treatment leftovers. (2019-05-15)
It's in the weeds: Herbicide linked to human liver disease
Exposure to glyphosate, the primary ingredient in the popular weed killer Roundup, correlates to more severe cases of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. (2019-05-14)
New method developed to detect and trace homemade bombs
Researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with Northumbria University, have developed a new way of detecting homemade explosives which will help forensic scientists trace where it came from. (2019-05-09)
The perils of a leader who is too extroverted
Extroverts are often seen as natural leaders in organizations. But a new study suggests that some leaders may have too much of a good thing. (2019-05-06)
New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs
Scientists at the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa Department of Biology have developed a technique for measuring the amount of living coral on a reef by analyzing DNA in small samples of seawater. (2019-04-17)
Surrey creates innovative lab test to develop easy-to-swallow medicine for children
Scientists at the University of Surrey and University College London have revealed an innovative in vitro method that can help to develop easy to swallow medicine for children and older people. (2019-03-20)
Fingermark imaging for drug detection
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from Zhejiang have uncovered a novel method of using nanocarrier-based biological fluorescent probes for detecting amphetamine and ketamine in latent fingermark, in a bid to combat drug abuse. (2019-03-14)
India's stubble burning air pollution causes USD 30 billion economic losses, health risks
India's air pollution made headlines around the globe last year. (2019-03-04)
SDSU study looks to limit secondhand smoke in homes with children
SDSU researchers found at least some smokers with kids will modify their behavior with an electronic push. (2019-03-04)
Crop residue burning is a major contributor to air pollution in South Asia
Urban emissions of black carbon from fossil fuel combustion are not always the main contributor to severe air pollution in south Asian megacities like New Delhi, shows a new study by researchers from Stockholm University and the Indian Institute for Tropical Meteorology, published in the journal Nature Sustainability. (2019-02-27)
Thirdhand smoke residue exposes children to chemicals
In ''Nicotine on Children's Hands: Limited Protection of Smoking Bans and Initial Clinical Findings,'' published Jan. (2019-02-07)
'Unclonable' tag combats counterfeiters
Discovering that your new designer handbag or gold watch is a fake is costly and annoying, and counterfeit medical devices or drugs could have even more serious consequences. (2019-02-06)
Research shows hidden fire risk of emollients
New research carried out by forensic scientists at Anglia Ruskin University has shown that commonly-used emollients can pose a significant fire risk once they have dried on fabric such as clothing and bedding. (2019-02-04)
Page 1 of 15 | 571 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Accessing Better Health
Essential health care is a right, not a privilege ... or is it? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can give everyone access to a healthier way of life, despite who you are or where you live. Guests include physician Raj Panjabi, former NYC health commissioner Mary Bassett, researcher Michael Hendryx, and neuroscientist Rachel Wurzman.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#544 Prosperity Without Growth
The societies we live in are organised around growth, objects, and driving forward a constantly expanding economy as benchmarks of success and prosperity. But this growing consumption at all costs is at odds with our understanding of what our planet can support. How do we lower the environmental impact of economic activity? How do we redefine success and prosperity separate from GDP, which politicians and governments have focused on for decades? We speak with ecological economist Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey, Director of the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Propserity, and author of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab