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Current Antarctic ice sheet News and Events

Current Antarctic ice sheet News and Events, Antarctic ice sheet News Articles.
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Bad break-ups may not trigger weight gain from emotional eating
That pint of ice cream after a nasty breakup may not do as much damage as you think. (2019-10-17)
Newly discovered microbes band together, 'flip out'
Scientists have found a new species of choanoflagellate. This close relative of animals forms sheets of cells that 'flip' inside-out in response to light, alternating between a cup-shaped feeding form and a ball-like swimming form. (2019-10-17)
Stranded whales detected from space
A new technique for analysing satellite images may help scientists detect and count stranded whales from space. (2019-10-17)
Information theory as a forensics tool for investigating climate mysteries
During Earth's last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly. (2019-10-16)
Inside the fuel cell -- Imaging method promises industrial insight
Hydrogen-containing substances are important for many industries, but scientists have struggled to obtain detailed images to understand the element's behavior. (2019-10-15)
Study offers solution to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle
New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades. (2019-10-10)
Aerial photographs shed light on Mont Blanc ice loss
Photographs taken in the exact same spot 100 years apart show the impact of climate change on the Mont Blanc massif. (2019-10-10)
New research sheds light on the ages of lunar ice deposits
The discovery of ice deposits in craters scattered across the Moon's south pole has helped to renew interest in exploring the lunar surface. (2019-10-10)
Study suggests ice on lunar south pole may have more than 1 source
New research sheds light on the ages of ice deposits reported in the area of the Moon's south pole -- information that could help identify the sources of the deposits and help in planning future human exploration. (2019-10-10)
When laying their eggs, tobacco hawkmoths avoid plants that smell of caterpillar feces
Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology demonstrated that not only plant odors determine the best oviposition site for egglaying hawkmoths, but also the frass of other larvae. (2019-10-08)
Study recommends special protection of emperor penguins
In a new study published this week in the journal Biological Conservation, an international team of researchers recommends the need for additional measures to protect and conserve one of the most iconic Antarctic species -- the emperor penguin (Aptenodyptes forsteri). (2019-10-08)
The last mammoths died on a remote island
Isolation, extreme weather, and the possible arrival of humans may have killed off the holocene herbivores just 4,000 years ago. (2019-10-07)
Disappearing Peruvian glaciers
It is common knowledge that glaciers are melting in most areas across the globe. (2019-10-07)
Dust in ice cores leads to new knowledge on the advancement of the ice before the ice age
Working with the ice core ReCap, drilled close to the coast in East Greenland, postdoc Marius Simonsen wondered why the dust particles from the interglacial period -- the warmer period of time between the ice ages -- were several times bigger than the dust particles from the ice age. (2019-10-04)
Laser precision: NASA flights, satellite align over sea ice
The skies were clear, the winds were low, and the lasers aligned. (2019-10-03)
The private lives of sharks
White sharks are top predators in the marine environment, but unlike their terrestrial counterparts, very little is known about their predatory activity underwater, with current knowledge limited to surface predation events. (2019-10-01)
This flat structure morphs into shape of a human face when temperature changes
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have designed 3-D printed meshlike structures that morph from flat layers into predetermined shapes, such as a human face, in response to changes in ambient temperature. (2019-09-30)
Plugging the ozone hole has indirectly helped Antarctic sea ice to increase
A new study demonstrates that the recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole causes decreases in clouds over Southern Hemisphere (SH) high latitudes and increases in clouds over the SH extratropics. (2019-09-29)
Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on the east Antarctic ice sheet
The number of meltwater lakes on the surface of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is more significant than previously thought, according to new research. (2019-09-26)
Humankind did not live with a high-carbon dioxide atmosphere until 1965
Humans have never before lived with the high carbon dioxide atmospheric conditions that have become the norm on Earth in the last 60 years, according to a new study that includes a Texas A&M University researcher. (2019-09-25)
2019 Arctic sea ice minimum tied for second lowest on record
The extent of Arctic sea ice at the end of this summer was effectively tied with 2007 and 2016 for second lowest since modern record keeping began in the late 1970s. (2019-09-23)
Weathering Antarctic storms -- Weather balloon data boost forecasting skill
Strong cyclones over the Southern Ocean and Antarctica can be very dangerous, and are relatively difficult to predict accurately because of the sparsity of observational data from this region. (2019-09-20)
Surface melting causes Antarctic glaciers to slip faster towards the ocean
Study shows for the first time a direct link between surface melting and short bursts of glacier acceleration in Antarctica. (2019-09-20)
The global imperative in stabilizing temperature increases at 1.5 degrees Celsius
Limiting warming to 1.5° Celsius rather than 2.0° Celsius would maintain significant proportions of systems such as Arctic summer sea ice, forests and coral reefs and have clear benefits for human health and economies, say Ove Hoegh-Guldberg and colleagues in this Review. (2019-09-19)
New SwRI study argues that Saturn's rings are actually not young
No one knows for certain when Saturn's iconic rings formed, but a new study co-authored by a Southwest Research Institute scientist suggests that they are much older than some scientists think. (2019-09-18)
Tailored 'cell sheets' to improve post-operative wound closing and healing
Scientists have designed a new method for post-operative wound closing and healing that is both fast and effective. (2019-09-18)
Greenland's growing 'ice slabs' intensify meltwater runoff into ocean
Thick, impenetrable ice slabs are expanding rapidly on the interior of Greenland's ice sheet, where the ice is normally porous and able to reabsorb meltwater. (2019-09-18)
Dust from a giant asteroid crash caused an ancient ice age
About 466 million years ago, long before the age of the dinosaurs, the Earth froze. (2019-09-18)
Hyperbolic paraboloid origami harnesses bistability to enable new applications
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Tokyo are looking the 'hypar' origami for ways to leverage its structural properties. (2019-09-17)
March of the multiple penguin genomes
Published today in GigaScience is an article presenting 19 high-coverage penguin genome sequences. (2019-09-17)
New microscopes unravel the mysteries of brain organization
The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes is revealed today in Nature Methods. (2019-09-16)
Low sea-ice cover in the Arctic
The sea-ice extent in the Arctic is nearing its annual minimum at the end of the melt season in September. (2019-09-13)
Geologists found links between deep sea methane emissions and ice ages
Since 2012, researchers at the Division of Bedrock Geology in the Department of Geology of Tallinn University of Technology Aivo Lepland and Tõnu Martma have been engaged in the research of an international research group investigating the factors controlling methane seepages and reconstructing the chronology of past methane emissions in one of the world's most climate-sensitive regions -- the Barents Sea in the Arctic. (2019-09-11)
Malaria could be felled by an Antarctic sea sponge
The frigid waters of the Antarctic may yield a treatment for a deadly disease that affects populations in some of the hottest places on earth. (2019-09-11)
Sulphur emissions from marine algae dropped during glacial periods
Contrary to conventional wisdom, sulphur production by tiny marine algae decreased during glacial periods, and is more closely linked to climate than previously thought, according to latest research by scientists in Japan. (2019-09-11)
Scientists triple storage time of human donor livers
A new method of preservation maintains human liver tissue for up to 27 hours will give doctors and patients a much longer timeframe for organ transplant. (2019-09-09)
Graphene layer enables advance in super-resolution microscopy
Researchers at Göttingen University developed a new method that uses the unusual properties of graphene to interact with fluorescing molecules. (2019-09-03)
Researchers develop technique to de-ice surfaces in seconds
Airplane wings, wind turbines and indoor heating systems all struggle under the weight and chill of ice. (2019-09-03)
Vintage film shows Thwaites Glacier ice shelf melting faster than previously observed
Newly available archival film has revealed the eastern ice shelf of Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is melting faster than previous estimates, suggesting the shelf may collapse sooner than expected. (2019-09-02)
USF-led team deciphers sea level rise from the last time Earth's CO2 set record highs
Mallorcan cave yields 3-million-year-old geologic evidence giving scientists new insight into past climate change. (2019-08-30)
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