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Current Anthropology News and Events

Current Anthropology News and Events, Anthropology News Articles.
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Preserving old bones with modern technology
A team of University of Colorado Boulder anthropologists is out to change the way that scientists study old bones damage-free. (2019-09-26)
Today's obesity epidemic may have been caused by childhood sugar intake decades ago
Current obesity rates in adults in the United States could be the result of dietary changes that took place decades ago, according to a new study published by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-09-23)
Rare 10 million-year-old fossil unearths new view of human evolution
Near an old mining town in Central Europe, known for its picturesque turquoise-blue quarry water, lay Rudapithecus. (2019-09-17)
Sex for cooperation
To understand the origins of human sociality studying the social dynamics of our closest relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, is important. (2019-09-10)
Sex and height might influence neck posture when viewing electronic handheld devices
Sex and height appear to influence how people flex their neck when viewing handheld devices, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Arkansas. (2019-09-04)
People transformed the world through land use by 3,000 years ago
Humans started making an impact on the global ecosystem through intensive farming much earlier than previously estimated, according to a new study published in the journal Science. (2019-08-29)
Ancient civilizations were already messing up the planet
As issues like climate change, global warming, and renewable energy dominate the national conversation, it's easy to assume these topics are exclusive to the modern world. (2019-08-29)
Native approaches to fire management
In collaboration with tribes in Northern California, researchers examined traditional fire management practices and found that these approaches, if expanded, could strengthen cultures and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires in Northern California. (2019-08-26)
Humans migrated to Mongolia much earlier than previously believed
Stone tools uncovered in Mongolia by an international team of archaeologists indicate that modern humans traveled across the Eurasian steppe about 45,000 years ago. (2019-08-16)
In difficult times, having multiple husbands can be an advantage
Researchers infer that women can buffer themselves against economic and social crises, and more effectively keep their children alive. (2019-08-14)
Research bias may leave some primates at risk
Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Santa Clara University. (2019-08-14)
Cooperation with high status individuals may increase one's own status
While other animals tend to gain status through aggression, humans are typically averse to allowing such dominant individuals to achieve high status. (2019-08-06)
Who dominates the discourse of the past?
Male academics, who comprise less than 10% of North American archaeologists, write the vast majority of the field's high impact, peer-reviewed literature. (2019-07-29)
Chimpanzees' working memory similar to ours
Working memory is central to our mental lives; we use it to add up the cost of our shopping or to remember the beginning of this sentence at its end. (2019-07-23)
Long live the long-limbed African chicken
For generations, household farmers in the Horn of Africa have selectively chosen chickens with certain traits that make them more appealing. (2019-07-16)
Ancient molar points to interbreeding between archaic humans and Homo sapiens in Asia
An analysis of a 160,000-year-old archaic human molar fossil discovered in China offers the first morphological evidence of interbreeding between archaic humans and Homo sapiens in Asia. (2019-07-08)
The ancient history of Neandertals in Europe
Parts of the genomes of two ~120,000-year-old Neandertals from Germany and Belgium have been sequenced at the MPI for Evolutionary Anthropology. (2019-06-26)
The brain consumes half of a child's energy -- and that could matter for weight gain
In a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 'A hypothesis linking the energy demand of the brain to obesity risk,' co-authors Christopher Kuzawa of Northwestern University and Clancy Blair of New York University School of Medicine, propose that variation in the energy needs of brain development across kids -- in terms of the timing, intensity and duration of energy use -- could influence patterns of energy expenditure and weight gain. (2019-06-17)
Monkeys face climate change extinction threat
Monkeys living in South America are highly vulnerable to climate change and face an ''elevated risk of extinction'', according to a new University of Stirling-led study. (2019-06-12)
Athletes with sickle cell traits are at more risk to collapse: here's why
A genetic variation known to affect sickle cell disease might be the reason why some college football players experience adverse clinical outcomes during periods of extreme physical exertion and others do not. (2019-05-09)
A surprise: Bonobos eat and share meat at rates similar to chimpanzees
Small forest antelope in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have more to worry about than being eaten by leopards. (2019-04-29)
Human settlements in Amazonia much older than previously thought
Humans settled in southwestern Amazonia and even experimented with agriculture much earlier than previously thought, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-04-24)
Researchers interpret Cherokee inscriptions in Alabama cave
For the first time, a team of scholars and archaeologists has recorded and interpreted Cherokee inscriptions in Manitou Cave, Alabama. (2019-04-10)
Are you with me? New model explains origins of empathy
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute and the Santa Fe Institute have developed a new model to explain the evolutionary origins of empathy and other related phenomena, such as emotional contagion and contagious yawning. (2019-04-08)
The carbon offset market: Leveraging forest carbon's value in the Brazilian Amazon
As companies seek and are required to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, the world's carbon markets are expanding. (2019-04-05)
Poverty leaves a mark on our genes
In this study, researchers found evidence that poverty can become embedded across wide swaths of the genome. (2019-04-04)
Scientists measure extent of recovery for critically endangered black abalone
One critically endangered species of smooth-shelled abalone is making a comeback in certain parts of its range along the California coast. (2019-04-02)
New virtual reality tool allows you to see the world through the eyes of a tiny primate
Imagine that you live in the rainforests of Southeast Asia, you're a pint-sized primate with enormous eyes and you look a little like Gizmo from the movie, 'Gremlins.' You're a tarsier -- a nocturnal animal whose giant eyes provide you with exceptional visual sensitivity, enabling a predatory advantage. (2019-03-25)
C-sections are seen as breastfeeding barrier in US, but not in other global communities
Amanda Veile, an assistant professor of anthropology at Purdue University, and her team report that indigenous mothers in farming communities in Yucatán, Mexico, breastfeed for about 1.5 months longer following cesarean deliveries than they do following vaginal deliveries. (2019-03-21)
Wild African ape reactions to novel camera traps
An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. (2019-03-14)
Revamping science: Making room for more voices
Science is known for being objective and apolitical, but is it? (2019-03-12)
Fossil teeth from Kenya solve ancient monkey mystery
The teeth of a new fossil monkey, unearthed in the badlands of northwest Kenya, help fill a 6-million-year void in Old World monkey evolution, according to a study by US and Kenyan scientists published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2019-03-11)
Short birth intervals associated with higher offspring mortality in primates
Shorter intervals between primate births are associated with higher mortality rates in offspring, finds a new study of macaque monkeys. (2019-03-11)
Chimpanzees lose their behavioral and cultural diversity
Chimpanzees are well known for their extraordinary diversity of behaviors, with some behaviors also exhibiting cultural variation. (2019-03-07)
Dust affects tooth wear and chewing efficiency in chimpanzees
Periodical dust loads on foods places dietary-physiological stress on the digestive system in chimpanzees. (2019-03-06)
Seven moral rules found all around the world
What is morality? And to what extent does it vary around the world? (2019-03-04)
A disconnect between migrants' stories and their health
While some Mexican immigrants give positive accounts about migrating to and living in the United States, their health status tells a different story. (2019-02-25)
UCF study finds high IQs won't be enough to prevent ecological disasters
High IQs aren't going to be enough to stop an ecological disaster. (2019-02-22)
Indigenous hunters have positive impacts on food webs in desert Australia
Australia has the highest rate of mammal extinction in the world. (2019-02-17)
Scholar to talk about household water insecurity
A Northwestern anthropology professor will discuss the first cross-culturally equivalent measurement of household water insecurity (2019-02-15)
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