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Current Anthropology News and Events

Current Anthropology News and Events, Anthropology News Articles.
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Chimpanzees' working memory similar to ours
Working memory is central to our mental lives; we use it to add up the cost of our shopping or to remember the beginning of this sentence at its end. (2019-07-23)
Long live the long-limbed African chicken
For generations, household farmers in the Horn of Africa have selectively chosen chickens with certain traits that make them more appealing. (2019-07-16)
Ancient molar points to interbreeding between archaic humans and Homo sapiens in Asia
An analysis of a 160,000-year-old archaic human molar fossil discovered in China offers the first morphological evidence of interbreeding between archaic humans and Homo sapiens in Asia. (2019-07-08)
The ancient history of Neandertals in Europe
Parts of the genomes of two ~120,000-year-old Neandertals from Germany and Belgium have been sequenced at the MPI for Evolutionary Anthropology. (2019-06-26)
The brain consumes half of a child's energy -- and that could matter for weight gain
In a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 'A hypothesis linking the energy demand of the brain to obesity risk,' co-authors Christopher Kuzawa of Northwestern University and Clancy Blair of New York University School of Medicine, propose that variation in the energy needs of brain development across kids -- in terms of the timing, intensity and duration of energy use -- could influence patterns of energy expenditure and weight gain. (2019-06-17)
Monkeys face climate change extinction threat
Monkeys living in South America are highly vulnerable to climate change and face an ''elevated risk of extinction'', according to a new University of Stirling-led study. (2019-06-12)
Athletes with sickle cell traits are at more risk to collapse: here's why
A genetic variation known to affect sickle cell disease might be the reason why some college football players experience adverse clinical outcomes during periods of extreme physical exertion and others do not. (2019-05-09)
A surprise: Bonobos eat and share meat at rates similar to chimpanzees
Small forest antelope in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have more to worry about than being eaten by leopards. (2019-04-29)
Human settlements in Amazonia much older than previously thought
Humans settled in southwestern Amazonia and even experimented with agriculture much earlier than previously thought, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-04-24)
Researchers interpret Cherokee inscriptions in Alabama cave
For the first time, a team of scholars and archaeologists has recorded and interpreted Cherokee inscriptions in Manitou Cave, Alabama. (2019-04-10)
Are you with me? New model explains origins of empathy
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute and the Santa Fe Institute have developed a new model to explain the evolutionary origins of empathy and other related phenomena, such as emotional contagion and contagious yawning. (2019-04-08)
The carbon offset market: Leveraging forest carbon's value in the Brazilian Amazon
As companies seek and are required to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, the world's carbon markets are expanding. (2019-04-05)
Poverty leaves a mark on our genes
In this study, researchers found evidence that poverty can become embedded across wide swaths of the genome. (2019-04-04)
Scientists measure extent of recovery for critically endangered black abalone
One critically endangered species of smooth-shelled abalone is making a comeback in certain parts of its range along the California coast. (2019-04-02)
New virtual reality tool allows you to see the world through the eyes of a tiny primate
Imagine that you live in the rainforests of Southeast Asia, you're a pint-sized primate with enormous eyes and you look a little like Gizmo from the movie, 'Gremlins.' You're a tarsier -- a nocturnal animal whose giant eyes provide you with exceptional visual sensitivity, enabling a predatory advantage. (2019-03-25)
C-sections are seen as breastfeeding barrier in US, but not in other global communities
Amanda Veile, an assistant professor of anthropology at Purdue University, and her team report that indigenous mothers in farming communities in Yucatán, Mexico, breastfeed for about 1.5 months longer following cesarean deliveries than they do following vaginal deliveries. (2019-03-21)
Wild African ape reactions to novel camera traps
An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. (2019-03-14)
Revamping science: Making room for more voices
Science is known for being objective and apolitical, but is it? (2019-03-12)
Fossil teeth from Kenya solve ancient monkey mystery
The teeth of a new fossil monkey, unearthed in the badlands of northwest Kenya, help fill a 6-million-year void in Old World monkey evolution, according to a study by US and Kenyan scientists published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2019-03-11)
Short birth intervals associated with higher offspring mortality in primates
Shorter intervals between primate births are associated with higher mortality rates in offspring, finds a new study of macaque monkeys. (2019-03-11)
Chimpanzees lose their behavioral and cultural diversity
Chimpanzees are well known for their extraordinary diversity of behaviors, with some behaviors also exhibiting cultural variation. (2019-03-07)
Dust affects tooth wear and chewing efficiency in chimpanzees
Periodical dust loads on foods places dietary-physiological stress on the digestive system in chimpanzees. (2019-03-06)
Seven moral rules found all around the world
What is morality? And to what extent does it vary around the world? (2019-03-04)
A disconnect between migrants' stories and their health
While some Mexican immigrants give positive accounts about migrating to and living in the United States, their health status tells a different story. (2019-02-25)
UCF study finds high IQs won't be enough to prevent ecological disasters
High IQs aren't going to be enough to stop an ecological disaster. (2019-02-22)
Indigenous hunters have positive impacts on food webs in desert Australia
Australia has the highest rate of mammal extinction in the world. (2019-02-17)
Scholar to talk about household water insecurity
A Northwestern anthropology professor will discuss the first cross-culturally equivalent measurement of household water insecurity (2019-02-15)
'X-ray gun' helps researchers pinpoint the origins of pottery found on ancient shipwreck
About eight hundred years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea. (2019-02-08)
Searching for human remains: Study suggests methodology to improve results
In an effort to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of law enforcement searches for human remains in the wild, searchers should cover the same area twice from two different angles and work no more than 1 to 2 meters apart while exploring the area (2019-01-29)
OU and Smithsonian address challenges of curating ancient biomolecules
University of Oklahoma researchers, led by Courtney Hofman and Rita Austin, in collaboration with the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, are addressing the challenges of curating ancient biomolecules and working toward the development and dissemination of best practices. (2019-01-29)
Understanding our early human ancestors: Australopithecus sediba
Following the 2008 discovery of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind, South Africa by Lee Berger of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, where two of the most complete skeletons of early human ancestors were found, a new hominin species, 'Australopithecus sediba (Au. sediba),' was named. (2019-01-17)
An ancient relative of humans shows a surprisingly modern trait
A relative of modern humans that lived at least 104,000 years ago in northern China showed evidence of dental growth and development very similar to that of people today, a new study found. (2019-01-16)
Research finds serious problems with forensic software
New research finds significant flaws in recently released forensic software designed to assess the age of individuals based on their skeletal remains. (2019-01-14)
3,000-year-old eastern North American quinoa discovered in Ontario
A mass of charred seeds found while clearing a home construction site in Brantford, Ontario, has been identified as ancient, domesticated goosefoot (C. berlandieri spp. jonesianum), a form of quinoa native to Eastern North America. (2019-01-14)
Relationship between low income and obesity is relatively new, says study
It's a fact: poverty and obesity are intimately connected. But this relationship is only about 30 years old, according to a new study coauthored by UT researchers and published in Palgrave Communications, an open-access, online journal. (2018-12-11)
The tragedy of the commons -- minus the tragedy
Sometimes, there is no 'tragedy' in the tragedy of the commons, according to a new analysis that challenges a widely accepted theory. (2018-11-26)
Short stature in rainforest hunter-gatherers potentially linked to cardiac adaptations
African and Asian rainforest hunter-gatherers share short stature, and now an international team of researchers has shown that this is an example of convergent adaptation that may also be linked to changes in cardiac development pathways. (2018-11-12)
ANU study casts new light on fishing throughout history
A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed new insights into ancient fishing throughout history, including what type of fish people were regularly eating as part of their diet. (2018-11-11)
Quantitative 3D analysis of bone tools sheds light on ancient manufacture and use
Quantitative three-dimensional analysis of bone wear patterns can provide insight into the manufacture and use of early human tools, according to a study by Naomi Martisius of the University of California at Davis and colleagues, published Nov. (2018-11-07)
Your blood pressure and heart rate change to meet physical and social demands
Blood pressure and heart rate are not fixed, but rather they adapt to meet physical and social demands placed on the body, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York. (2018-10-30)
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