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Current Antibodies News and Events

Current Antibodies News and Events, Antibodies News Articles.
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New biomarker-guided strategy has potential for liver cancer treatment
A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discovered a cellular pathway tied to cancer that may be beneficial in reducing side effects and extending duration of immunotherapy in some patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer. (2019-07-15)
Tightening the tumor-targeting abilities of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy
Seeking to improve upon existing checkpoint inhibitor therapies, scientists have developed a common checkpoint inhibitor (anti-PD-L1) in a nanoparticle formulation, which were activated specifically at tumor sites in mouse models of cancer. (2019-07-12)
Anaphylactic shock: IgG antibodies and neutrophils play an unexpected role
Teams from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm, the Paris Public Hospital Network (AP-HP), the CNRS, Paris-Sud University and Sorbonne University have successfully identified a new pathological mechanism responsible for the unexplained cases of anaphylactic shock, involving neutrophils activated by antibodies of the IgG class. (2019-07-10)
Old protein, new tricks: UMD connects a protein to antibody immunity for the first time
How can a protein be a major contributor in the development of birth defects, and also hold the potential to provide symptom relief from autoimmune diseases like lupus? (2019-07-09)
It's not an antibody, it's a frankenbody: A new tool for live-cell imaging
Researchers from Colorado State University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology have added a new tool to the arsenal of antibody-based probes, but with a powerful distinction: Their genetically encoded probe works in living cells. (2019-07-03)
Researchers at IDIBELL-ICO describe a new resistance mechanism
Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the ProCure Program of the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO) published today at Cancer Research a study describing a new mechanism in cancer that turns cells into malignant cells and contradicts what had been published so far about drug resistance that prevent the formation of blood vessels (anti-angiogenics). (2019-07-02)
An improved vaccine for bacterial meningitis and bloodstream infections
Researchers have now developed a new vaccine, a native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine, for meningitis and bloodstream infections caused by 'meningococcal group B' bacteria. (2019-06-28)
Immunological discovery opens new possibilities for using antibodies
Researchers from the University of Turku have discovered a new route that transports subcutaneously administered antibodies into lymph nodes in just a few seconds. (2019-06-26)
New therapy promotes vascular repair following stroke
Following a stroke, antibodies that inhibit the signaling molecule Nogo-A can help repair blood vessels in the affected brain regions. (2019-06-24)
Using graphene and tiny droplets to detect stomach-cancer causing bacteria
A Japan-based research team led by Osaka University used graphene and microfluidics to identify stomach-cancer causing bacteria by detecting chemical reactions of the bacteria at the surface of the biosensor. (2019-06-20)
Sugars that coat proteins are a possible drug target for pancreatitis
CA19-9 is a complex sugar structure that coats proteins. Elevated levels of CA19-9 was found to cause inflammation in the pancreas in mice and promote rapid progression to pancreatic cancer. (2019-06-20)
PCSK9 inhibitors: Specific studies are mandatory to prove efficacy and safety in CKD
High cardiovascular morbidity and mortality remains a persisting problem in patients with CKDPCSK9 inhibition represents a novel and successful treatment approach to reduce LDL-C in patients with normal to moderately impaired kidney function. (2019-06-13)
Rheumatoid arthritic pain could be caused by antibodies
Antibodies that exist in the joints before the onset of rheumatoid arthritis can cause pain even in the absence of arthritis, researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report. (2019-06-13)
New insight could improve maternal vaccines that also protect newborns
Duke researchers describe a previously unidentified route for antibodies to be transferred from the mother to the fetus, illuminating a potential way to capitalize on this process to control when and how certain antibodies are shared. (2019-06-13)
Identification of protective antibodies may be key to effective malaria vaccine
Researchers from the University of Oxford, along with partners from five institutions around the world, have identified the human antibodies that prevent the malaria parasite from entering blood cells, which may be key to creating a highly effective malaria vaccination. (2019-06-13)
Breaking the code: How is a mother's immunity transferred to her baby?
A study based at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard has determined how a pregnant woman's vaccine-induced immunity is transferred to her child, which has implications for the development of more effective maternal vaccines. (2019-06-13)
Norovirus structures could help develop treatments for food poisoning
Researchers at CSHL used cryo-EM and computational tools to reconstruct the shell structures of four different strains of human noroviruses. (2019-06-12)
Promising treatment option for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
A study, published today in PNAS, has found a potential treatment for patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). (2019-06-11)
Antibodies against HPV16 can develop up to 40 years before throat cancer is diagnosed
An international group of researchers has found that antibodies to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) develop in the body between six to 40 years prior to a clinical diagnosis of throat cancer, and their presence indicates a strong increased risk of the disease. (2019-06-11)
Study drug delays type 1 diabetes in high risk children and adults
A drug that targets the immune system can delay the onset of type 1 diabetes an average of two years in children and adults at high risk, according to findings from TrialNet's Teplizumab (anti-CD3) Prevention Study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. (2019-06-10)
DNA nanorobots target HER2-positive breast cancer cells
According to the Mayo Clinic, about 20% of breast cancers make abnormally high levels of a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). (2019-06-05)
A new way to block malaria transmission by targeting young contagious parasite forms
Boosting our natural antibody responses against the transmissible parasite stage could hold the key to combatting the malaria parasite and preventing the spread of the disease. (2019-06-05)
Stalk antibodies provide flu protection in humans
A universal flu vaccine that could prevent a potential influenza pandemic has been a holy grail for epidemiologists around the world ever since the first flu vaccines were developed in 1938. (2019-06-03)
NIH-supported study reveals a novel indicator of influenza immunity
A study of influenza virus transmission in Nicaraguan households reveals new insights into the type of immune responses that may be protective against influenza virus infection, report investigators. (2019-06-03)
Wild boars, hunting dogs and hunters carry tick-borne bacteria
Rickettsia bacteria cause a number of human and animal infections, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever. (2019-05-30)
Breastfeeding moms' milk can transfer lifelong protection against infection to their babies
Research in mice has found that the transfer of immunity from mum to baby can be long-term, beyond the period of breastfeeding. (2019-05-29)
Microglia turned on
Part of the immune system in the brain is made up of so-called microglia cells. (2019-05-27)
Shedding light on the burden of dengue in Bangladesh
Dengue, also known as dengue fever, is a viral disease transmitted to humans by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. (2019-05-24)
Scientists (dis)solve a century-long mystery to treat asthma and airway inflammation
Belgian research groups from the VIB, Ghent University, Ghent University Hospital, and the biotech company argenx have solved a century-long puzzle about the presence of protein crystals in asthma. (2019-05-23)
Monkey-infecting virus may provide part of future HIV vaccine
A protein from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV), which can infect monkeys and apes, has shown promise as a potential component of a vaccine against Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), in a new study from scientists at Scripps Research. (2019-05-22)
New 3D-printed technology lowers cost of common medical test
A desire for a simpler, cheaper way to do common laboratory tests for medical diagnoses and to avoid 'washing the dishes' led University of Connecticut researchers to develop a new technology that reduces cost and time. (2019-05-22)
Translational research led by Singapore scientists uncovers new treatment for fatty liver disease
A new treatment approach that involves blocking a protein has, for the first time, shown promising results in the treatment of fatty liver disease, in a landmark translational research collaboration between Duke-NUS Medical School, National Heart Centre Singapore and biotech company Enleofen Bio. (2019-05-22)
Nivolumab with ipilimumab: Combination has added benefit in advanced renal cell carcinoma
There are advantages in overall survival, which are not offset by any disadvantages of similar importance. (2019-05-17)
Early dengue virus infection could "defuse" zika virus
The Zika virus outbreak in Latin America has affected over 60 million people up to now. (2019-05-17)
Antibody responses vs. Ebola keep evolving in survivors, months after recovery
Antiviral antibodies produced by survivors of Ebola infection continue to evolve and improve after recovery, according to a study of immune responses in four people who received care at Emory University Hospital in 2014. (2019-05-16)
Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus
The ever-changing 'head' of an influenza virus protein has an unexpected Achilles heel, report NIAID-funded scientists. (2019-05-16)
Protection by the malaria vaccine: not only a matter of quantity but also of quality
The quantity and quality of antibodies recognizing the end region of the malaria parasite's CSP protein is a good marker of protection by the RTS,S/AS01E vaccine, shows a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The results provide valuable information for guiding the design of future, more effective vaccines. (2019-05-15)
Johns Hopkins researchers find widely 'inconsistent' use of antibodies in lab experiments
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Center say they have affirmed widespread inconsistencies in the use of a common laboratory procedure called immunohistochemical staining, and say the variations are making many laboratory experiments unreliable. (2019-05-15)
New HIV vaccine strategy 'pumps' the immune system
A new HIV vaccine delivery strategy appears to enhance the protective immune response in a preclinical model. (2019-05-09)
Groundbreaking study could lead to fast, simple test for Ebola virus
In a breakthrough that could lead to a simple and inexpensive test for Ebola virus disease, researchers have generated two antibodies to the deadly virus. (2019-05-07)
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