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Current Applied physics News and Events

Current Applied physics News and Events, Applied physics News Articles.
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Immortal quantum particles
Decay is relentless in the macroscopic world: broken objects do not fit themselves back together again. (2019-06-14)
A microscopic topographic map of cellular function
The flow of traffic through our nation's highways and byways is meticulously mapped and studied, but less is known about how materials in cells travel. (2019-06-12)
Tiny light box opens new doors into the nanoworld
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a completely new way of capturing, amplifying and linking light to matter at the nanolevel. (2019-06-11)
Researchers 'stretch' the ability of 2D materials to change technology
Two-dimensional (2D) materials -- as thin as a single layer of atoms -- have intrigued scientists with their flexibility, elasticity, and unique electronic properties. (2019-06-10)
Researchers uncover a new obstacle to effective accelerator beams
Release proposes explanation for failure to focus accelerator-fired ion beams. (2019-06-06)
Probing semiconductor crystals with a sphere of light
Tohoku University researchers have developed a technique using a hollow sphere to measure the electronic and optical properties of large semiconducting crystals. (2019-06-06)
Using physics to print living tissue
3D printers can be used to make a variety of useful objects by building up a shape, layer by layer. (2019-06-04)
UV light may illuminate improvements for next generation electronic devices
NITech scientists have developed the method to make sure the mechanisms to connect between the two-dimensional layer of atoms and the semiconductors as perfect as possible, which will lead to develop novel optoelectronic devices. (2019-06-04)
Physicists can predict the jumps of Schrodinger's cat (and finally save it)
Yale researchers have figured out how to catch and save Schrödinger's famous cat, the symbol of quantum superposition and unpredictability, by anticipating its jumps and acting in real time to save it from proverbial doom. (2019-06-03)
Organic laser diodes move from dream to reality
Researchers from Japan have demonstrated that a long-elusive kind of laser diode based on organic semiconductors is indeed possible, paving the way for the further expansion of lasers in applications such as biosensing, displays, healthcare, and optical communications. (2019-05-31)
Breaking the symmetry in the quantum realm
For the first time, researchers have observed a break in a single quantum system. (2019-05-31)
Quantum information gets a boost from thin-film breakthrough
Efforts to create reliable light-based quantum computing, quantum key distribution for cybersecurity, and other technologies got a boost from a new study demonstrating an innovative method for creating thin films to control the emission of single photons. (2019-05-29)
The discovery of acoustic spin
Recently, Chengzhi Shi (now at Georgia Tech), Rongkuo Zhao, Sui Yang, Yuan Wang, and Xiang Zhang from the University of California, Berkeley and Long Yang, Hong Chen, and Jie Ren from Tongji University discover and experimentally observe the existence of acoustic spin in airborne sound waves. (2019-05-28)
Sound waves bypass visual limitations to recognize human activity
Video cameras continue to gain widespread use, but there are privacy and environmental limitations in how well they work. (2019-05-28)
Good vibrations: Using piezoelectricity to ensure hydrogen sensor sensitivity
Researchers at Osaka University developed a new method that uses piezoelectric resonance to improve the manufacture of highly sensitive hydrogen sensors. (2019-05-22)
Johns Hopkins researchers publish digital health roadmap
In the dizzying swirl of health-related websites, social media and smartphone apps, finding a reliable source of health information can be a challenge. (2019-05-21)
Strain enables new applications of 2D materials
Superconductors' never-ending flow of electrical current could provide new options for energy storage and superefficient electrical transmission and generation. (2019-05-21)
New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development
A a new method of assessing the actions of medicines by matching them to their unique protein receptors has the potential to greatly accelerate drug development and diminish the number of drug trials that fail during clinical trials. (2019-05-20)
New measurement device: Carbon dioxide as geothermometer
For the first time it is possible to measure, simultaneously and with extreme precision, four rare molecular variants of carbon dioxide (CO2) using a novel laser instrument. (2019-05-20)
Researchers develop new lens manufacturing technique
Researchers from Washington State University and Ohio State University have developed a low-cost, easy way to make custom lenses that could help manufacturers avoid the expensive molds required for optical manufacturing. (2019-05-20)
Discovering unusual structures from exception using big data and machine learning techniques
Machine learning (ML) has become a widely used technique in materials science study. (2019-05-16)
Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size
A multidisciplinary team has provided new insight into underlying mechanisms controlling the precise size of cells. (2019-05-16)
Balancing the beam: Thermomechanical micromachine detects terahertz radiation
Researchers at The University of Tokyo developed a microelectromechanical device that detects terahertz radiation at room temperature. (2019-05-15)
Digital quantum simulators can be astonishingly robust
Digital quantum simulators may be used to solve quantum-physical problems in many-body systems, but until now they are drastically limited to small systems and short times. (2019-05-14)
'Fire streaks' ever more real in the collisions of atomic nuclei and protons
Collisions of lead nuclei take place under extreme physical conditions. (2019-05-09)
Behold the mayo: Experiments reveal 'instability threshold' of elastic-plastic material
Lehigh University's Arindam Banerjee and his team have succeeded in characterizing the interface between an elastic-plastic material and a light material under acceleration. (2019-05-08)
Great chocolate is a complex mix of science, physicists reveal
The science of what makes good chocolate has been revealed by researchers studying a 140-year-old mixing technique. (2019-05-08)
Ultra-secure form of virtual money proposed
A new type of money that allows users to make decisions based on information arriving at different locations and times, and that could also protect against attacks from quantum computers, has been proposed by a researcher at the University of Cambridge. (2019-05-07)
The power of randomization: Magnetic skyrmions for novel computer technology
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have succeeded in developing a key constituent of a novel unconventional computing concept. (2019-05-06)
Russian scientists developed a system for malignant brain tumors diagnosing during surgery
Scientists of the Research Medical University of Volga region and the Institute of Applied Physics, RAS have developed a system for malignant brain tumors diagnosing during surgery. (2019-05-06)
Experimental device generates electricity from the coldness of the universe
A drawback of solar panels is that they require sunlight to generate electricity. (2019-05-06)
Quantum sensor for photons
A photodetector converts light into an electrical signal, causing the light to be lost. (2019-05-03)
Promising material could lead to faster, cheaper computer memory
Currently, information on a computer is encoded by magnetic fields, a process that requires substantial energy and generates waste heat. (2019-05-02)
Searching for lost WWII-era uranium cubes from Germany
In 2013, Timothy Koeth received an extraordinary gift: a heavy metal cube and a crumpled message that read, 'Taken from Germany, from the nuclear reactor Hitler tried to build. (2019-05-01)
Nanomaterials mimicking natural enzymes with superior catalytic activity and selectivity
A KAIST research team doped nitrogen and boron into graphene to selectively increase peroxidase-like activity and succeeded in synthesizing a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with a low cost and superior catalytic activity. (2019-04-30)
Scientists develop new model to describe how bacteria spread in different forms
A new model describing how bacteria spread when moving in two different forms has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2019-04-30)
Graphene sponge helps lithium sulphur batteries reach new potential
To meet the demands of an electric future, new battery technologies will be essential. (2019-04-29)
Novel method developed by HKBU scholars could help produce purer, safer drugs
Novel method developed by HKBU scholars could help produce purer, safer drugs (2019-04-29)
The search for nothing at all
In a new set of results published April 29, 2019 in the journal Nature, Bill Fairbank and his team at Colorado State University have laid the foundation for a single-atom illumination strategy called barium tagging. (2019-04-29)
Coffee machine helped physicists to make ion traps more efficient
Scientists from ITMO University have developed and applied a new method for analyzing the electromagnetic field inside ion traps. (2019-04-26)
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