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Current Applied physics News and Events

Current Applied physics News and Events, Applied physics News Articles.
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A cavity leads to a strong interaction between light and matter
Researchers have succeeded in creating an efficient quantum-mechanical light-matter interface using a microscopic cavity. (2019-10-21)
Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide
Bacterial cell division is controlled by both enzymatic activity and mechanical forces, which work together to control its timing and location, a new study from EPFL finds. (2019-10-21)
Three research papers published in Nature series journals
Department of Applied Physics of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) contributed 3 research papers that were recently published in the Nature series journals, which are among the most authoritative and recognized scientific journals in the world that publish high-quality research in all fields of science and technology. (2019-10-17)
Mathematicians find gold in data
Russian mathematicians and geophysicists have made a standard technique for ore prospecting several times more effective. (2019-10-16)
Quantum paradox experiment may lead to more accurate clocks and sensors
More accurate clocks and sensors may result from a recently proposed experiment, linking an Einstein-devised paradox to quantum mechanics. (2019-10-15)
Controlling the charge state of organic molecule quantum dots in a 2D nanoarray
Australian researchers have fabricated a self-assembled, carbon-based nanofilm where the charge state (ie, electronically neutral or positive) can be controlled at the level of individual molecules. (2019-10-15)
Creating miracles with polymeric fibers
Mohan Edirisinghe leads a team at University College London studying the fabrication of polymeric nanofibers and microfibers -- very thin fibers made up of polymers. (2019-10-15)
New understanding of the evolution of cosmic electromagnetic fields
Electromagnetism was discovered 200 years ago, but the origin of the very large electromagnetic fields in the universe is still a mystery. (2019-10-15)
Physicists shed new light on how liquids behave with other materials
Using a range of theoretical and simulation approaches, physicists from the University of Bristol have shown that liquids in contact with substrates can exhibit a finite number of classes of behavior and identify the important new ones. (2019-10-15)
Quantum physics: Ménage à trois photon-style
When two photons become entangled, the quantum state of the first will correlate perfectly with the quantum state of the second. (2019-10-15)
UW study advances alignment of single-wall carbon nanotubes along common axis
The researchers used machine-vision automation and parallelization to simultaneously produce globally aligned, single-wall carbon nanotubes using pressure-driven filtration. (2019-10-15)
Physics: DNA-PAINT super-resolution microscopy at speed
Optimized DNA sequences allow for 10-times faster image acquisition in DNA-PAINT. (2019-10-11)
New science on cracking leads to self-healing materials
Cracks in the desert floor appear random to the untrained eye, even beautifully so, but the mathematics governing patterns of dried clay turn out to be predictable -- and useful in designing advanced materials. (2019-10-10)
FSU physics researchers break new ground, explore unknown energy regions
Florida State University physicists are using photon-proton collisions to capture particles in an unexplored energy region, yielding new insights into the matter that binds parts of the nucleus together. (2019-10-10)
mpacts of low-dose exposure to antibiotics unveiled in zebrafish gut
An antibiotic commonly found at low concentrations in the environment can have major impacts on gut bacteria, report researchers at the University of Oregon. (2019-10-10)
Johns Hopkins researchers discover material that could someday power quantum computer
Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers. (2019-10-10)
Cooling nanotube resonators with electrons
In a study in Nature Physics, ICFO researchers report on a technique that uses electron transport to cool a nanomechanical resonator near the quantum regime. (2019-10-08)
Stabilizing multilayer flows may improve transportation of heavy oils
During the past 20 years, the oil industry has begun to transition away from light oils toward heavier oils. (2019-10-08)
Picoscience and a plethora of new materials
The revolutionary tech discoveries of the next few decades may come from new materials so small they make nanomaterials look like lumpy behemoths. (2019-10-07)
SUTD physicists unlock the mystery of thermionic emission in graphene
SUTD researchers discover a new theory that paves the way for the design of better graphene electronics and energy converters. (2019-10-07)
Axion particle spotted in solid-state crystal
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, Princeton University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have spotted a famously elusive particle: The axion - first predicted 42 years ago as an elementary particle in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. (2019-10-07)
More energy means more effects -- in proton collisions
The higher the collision energy of particles, the more interesting the physics. (2019-10-04)
2D topological physics from shaking a 1D wire
Published in Physical Review X, this new study propose a realistic scheme to observe a 'cold-atomic quantum Hall effect.' (2019-10-03)
Shape-shifting structures take the form of a face, antenna
Researchers have created the most complex shape-shifting structures to date -- lattices composed of multiple materials that grow or shrink in response to changes in temperature. (2019-10-03)
Can we peek at Schrodinger's cat without disturbing it?
Quantum physics is difficult and explaining it even more so. (2019-10-02)
Quantum vacuum: Less than zero energy
According to quantum physics, energy can be 'borrowed' -- at least for some time. (2019-10-02)
Intriguing discovery provides new insights into photoelectric effect
The discovery that free electrons can move asymmetrically provides a deeper understanding of one of the basic processes in physics: the photoelectric effect. (2019-10-01)
Squid-inspired robots might have environmental, propulsion applications
Inspired by cephalopods, scientists developed an aquatic robot that mimics their form of propulsion. (2019-10-01)
Machine learning at the quantum lab
The electron spin of individual electrons in quantum dots could serve as the smallest information unit of a quantum computer. (2019-09-26)
Light work for superconductors
For the first time researchers successfully used laser pulses to excite an iron-based compound into a superconducting state. (2019-09-25)
Research suggests there's a better way to teach physics to university students
Physicists and educators at the University of Kansas has developed a curriculum for college-level students that shows promise in helping students in introductory physics classes further practice and develop their calculus skills. (2019-09-25)
Crystal growth kinetics and its link to evolution
The research group of Dr. Igor Zlotnikov from the Center for Molecular Bioengineering (B CUBE) of TU Dresden demonstrate in its latest publication that the physics of materials has a strong impact on the possible structures that molluscan shells can produce. (2019-09-24)
Iridium 'loses its identity' when interfaced with nickel
Hey, physicists and materials scientists: You'd better reevaluate your work if you study iridium-based materials -- members of the platinum family -- when they are ultra-thin. (2019-09-24)
Thinner shells for delivering gentler therapeutic bursts
Releasing drugs that are packaged into microcapsules requires a significant amount of force, and the resulting burst can cause damage to human tissues or cause blood clots. (2019-09-23)
Up-close and personal with neuronal networks
Researchers from Harvard University have developed an electronic chip that can perform high-sensitivity intracellular recording from thousands of connected neurons simultaneously. (2019-09-23)
New method for the measurement of nano-structured light fields
Physicists and chemists at the University of Münster (Germany) have jointly succeeded in developing a so-called nano-tomographic technique which is able to detect the typically invisible properties of nano-structured fields in the focus of a lens. (2019-09-20)
Researchers develop unified sensor to better control effects of shock waves
Researchers with Yokohama National University in Japan have developed a unified shock sensor to quickly and accurately dispel harmful shock waves. (2019-09-19)
RUDN University mathematician first described the movement in a flat strip of plasma
RUDN University mathematician for the first time proved the theorem of existence and uniqueness of solutions of the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in a strip. (2019-09-19)
Bridge between quantum mechanics and general relativity still possible
An international team of researchers developed a unified framework that would account for this apparent break down between classical and quantum physics, and they put it to the test using a quantum satellite called Micius. (2019-09-19)
Scientists' design discovery doubles conductivity of indium oxide transparent coatings
esearchers at the University of Liverpool, University College London (UCL), NSG Group (Pilkington) and Diamond Light Source have made an important design discovery that could dramatically improve the performance of a key material used to coat touch screens and other devices. (2019-09-17)
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