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Current Arabidopsis News and Events

Current Arabidopsis News and Events, Arabidopsis News Articles.
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Moss protein corrects genetic defects of other plants
Almost all land plants employ an army of molecular editors who correct errors in their genetic information. (2020-07-02)
Revisiting energy flow in photosynthetic plant cells
By developing innovative methods to visualize energy changes in subcellular compartments in live plants, the team of Dr Boon Leong LIM, Associate Professor of the School of Biological Sciences of The University of Hong Kong, recently solved a controversial question in photosynthesis: what is the source of NADH (Reduced Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) for mitochondria to generate ATP (Adenosine triphosphate)? (2020-06-30)
Plant tissue engineering improves drought and salinity tolerance
After several years of experimentation, scientists have engineered thale cress, or Arabidopsis thaliana, to behave like a succulent, improving water-use efficiency, salinity tolerance and reducing the effects of drought. (2020-06-30)
Research in land plants shows nanoplastics accumulating in tissues
As concern grows among environmentalists and consumers about micro- and nanoplastics in the oceans and in seafood, they are increasingly studied in marine environments, say Baoshan Xing at UMass Amherst and colleagues in China. (2020-06-22)
Fungal pathogen disables plant defense mechanism
Cabbage plants defend themselves against herbivores and pathogens by deploying a defensive mechanism called the mustard oil bomb. (2020-06-19)
Cell wall research reveals possibility of simple and sustainable method to protect crops
Antonio Molina and his research group at Centro de Biotecnología y Genómica de Plantas in Spain aimed to understand the role of the cell wall in the regulation of plant resistance responses to pathogens. (2020-06-15)
Small see-through container improves plant micrografting
A transparent container made by Nagoya University researchers allows easy and quick grafting of very young plants, with benefits for agriculture and plant research. (2020-06-04)
How a molecular alarm system in plants protects them from danger
Some plants are known to possess an innate physiological defense machinery that helps them develop resistance against insects trying to feed on them. (2020-06-02)
Exchange of arms between chromosomes using molecular scissors
The CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors work like a fine surgical instrument and can be used to modify genetic information in plants. (2020-05-26)
Scientists discover mutation that enhances plant defense
Sometimes scientists begin research and find exactly what they expected. (2020-05-18)
How a molecular 'alarm' system in plants protects them from predators
Some plants, like soybean, are known to possess an innate defense machinery that helps them develop resistance against insects trying to feed on them. (2020-05-08)
Plants pass on 'memory' of stress to some progeny, making them more resilient
By manipulating the expression of one gene, geneticists can induce a form of 'stress memory' in plants that is inherited by some progeny, giving them the potential for more vigorous, hardy and productive growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery has significant implications for plant breeding. (2020-05-05)
Nanosensor can alert a smartphone when plants are stressed
MIT engineers can closely track how plants respond to stresses such as injury, infection, and light damage using sensors made of carbon nanotubes. (2020-04-15)
Hormone produced in starved leaves stimulates roots to take up nitrogen
A new study at Nagoya University has highlighted the extraordinary ability of plants to communicate between their shoots and roots to prevent starvation. (2020-04-09)
Mutation reduces energy waste in plants
In a way, plants are energy wasters: in order to protect themselves from excessive electron transport, they continuously quench light energy and don't use it for photosynthesis and biomass production. (2020-04-08)
Applying CRISPR beyond Arabidopsis thaliana
In the plant sciences, CRISPR--the bacterial gene editing toolbox that enables more precise and efficient editing of genomic sequences than previously possible--has initially been applied with genetic model organisms like Arabidopsis thaliana. (2020-04-06)
Plant root hairs key to reducing soil erosion
The tiny hairs found on plant roots play a pivotal role in helping reduce soil erosion, a new study has found. (2020-04-03)
Open sesame: Micro RNAs regulate plant pores
Environmental cues prompt small RNA segments to regulate the development and distribution of tiny pores involved in photosynthesis in plants. (2020-03-19)
A molecular map for the plant sciences
Plants are essential for life on earth. They provide food for essentially all organisms, oxygen for breathing, and they regulate the climate of the planet. (2020-03-12)
Plant physiology: Safeguarding chloroplasts from sunburn
Intense sunlight damages the chloroplasts that are essential for photosynthesis, and generates toxic products that can lead to cell death. (2020-03-12)
Newly discovered driver of plant cell growth contradicts current theories
The shape and growth of plant cells may not rely on increased fluidic pressure, or turgor, inside the cell as previously believed. (2020-02-27)
Putting a finger on plant stress response
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that a PHD zinc finger-like domain in SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 is essential for protein function in Arabidopsis. (2020-02-05)
Trees might be 'aware' of their size
Birch trees adjust their stem thickness to support their weight. (2020-01-30)
The regulators active during iron deficiency
Iron deficiency is a critical situation for plants, which respond using specific genetic programmes. (2020-01-24)
Research identifies possible on/off switch for plant growth
New research from UC Riverside identifies a protein that controls plant growth -- good news for an era in which crops can get crushed by climate change. (2020-01-13)
Plant physiology: One size may not suit all
A new study published by biologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich demonstrates that there are no simple or universal solutions to the problem of engineering plants to enable them to cope with the challenges posed by climate change. (2020-01-10)
Better anchor roots help crops grow in poor soils
A newly discovered plant metabolite that promotes anchor root growth may prove valuable in helping crops grow in nutrient-deficient soils. (2019-12-30)
Telomere research at Marshall published in Nature Communications
The findings show a clear genetic link between components of ribosome biogenesis pathway and telomere length, mapping a new direction for understanding and potentially treating human diseases caused by mutations in genes that control both the ribosome and telomere. (2019-12-20)
Gene expression regulation in Chinese cabbage illuminated
The important role played by the histone modification H3K27me3 in regulating gene expression in Chinese cabbage has been revealed. (2019-12-05)
Study shows first signs of cross-talk between RNA surveillance and silencing systems
Scientists in Korea find a protein that mediates the interaction between the cellular systems involved in rapid responses against foreign genes in plants. (2019-12-05)
Raising plants to withstand climate change
Success with improving a model plant's response to harsh conditions is leading plant molecular researchers to move to food crops including wheat, barley, rice and chickpeas. (2019-12-03)
Regulator of plant immunity tagged
Discovery of signaling intermediary could lead to more pest-resistant crops. (2019-11-26)
Melanin-producing Streptomyces are more likely to colonize plants
Recent research published in Phytobiomes Journal demonstrates that melanin-producing Streptomyces are more likely to colonize plants, which has been shown to be protective for many different organisms. (2019-11-20)
System by which plants have formed secondary buds since ancient times illuminated
A collaborative research group has succeeded in identifying an important transcription factor, GCAM1, which allows liverwort plants to asexually reproduce through creating clonal progenies (vegetative reproduction). (2019-11-13)
Revealing the nanostructure of wood could help raise height limits for wooden skyscrapers
Cambridge researchers have captured the visible nanostructure of living wood for the first time using an advanced low-temperature scanning electron microscope. (2019-10-23)
How roots grow hair
The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. (2019-10-17)
Carnivorous plant study captures universal rules of leaf making
Leaves display a remarkable range of forms from flat sheets with simple outlines to the cup-shaped traps found in carnivorous plants. (2019-10-10)
How plants react to fungi
Using special receptors, plants recognize when they are at risk of fungal infection. (2019-10-07)
New function in a protein of plants essential to developing drought-tolerant crops
Researchers of the Universitat Politècnica de València and the University of Malaga have discovered a new function in the BAG4 plant protein. (2019-09-26)
A Matter of concentration
Researchers are studying how proteins regulate the stem cells of plants. (2019-09-17)
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