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Ultrastable, selective catalyst for propane dehydrogenation developed
A group of Japanese scientists has developed an ultrastable, selective catalyst to dehydrogenate propane - an essential process to produce the key petrochemical substance of propylene - without deactivation, even at temperatures of more than 600°C. (2020-06-05)
DNA increases our understanding of contact between Stone Age cultures
What kind of interactions did the various Stone Age cultures have with one another? (2020-06-05)
Analysis of ancient genomes suggests Caribbean settled by three colonization events
The islands of the Caribbean were settled and resettled by at least three successive waves of colonists from the American mainland, according to a new study, which presents new findings from an examination of ancient DNA from 93 early Caribbean islanders. (2020-06-04)
Ancient genomic insights into the early peopling of the Caribbean
According to a new an international team of researchers from the Caribbean, Europe and North America, the Caribbean was settled by several successive population dispersals that originated on the American mainland. (2020-06-04)
Ancient DNA provides new insights into the early peopling of the Caribbean
According to a new study by an international team of researchers from the Caribbean, Europe and North America, the Caribbean was settled by several successive population dispersals that originated on the American mainland. (2020-06-04)
Largest, oldest Maya monument suggests importance of communal work
A University of Arizona discovery suggests that the Maya civilization developed more rapidly than archaeologists once thought and hints at less social inequality than later periods. (2020-06-03)
New Papua New Guinea research solves archaeological mysteries
New research which 'fills in the blanks' on what ancient Papuan New Guineans ate, and how they processed food, has ended decades-long speculation on tool use and food stables in the highlands of New Guinea several thousand years ago. (2020-06-03)
In anti-piracy work, blocking websites more effective when multiple sites are targeted
A new study that examined the effectiveness of anti-piracy efforts in the United Kingdom found that blocking websites can be effective but only when multiple channels are blocked. (2020-06-02)
Ancient genomes link subsistence change and human migration in northern China
Northern China is among the first centers in the world where agriculture developed, but its genetic history remains largely unknown. (2020-06-01)
NAU's Vulcan Project fossil fuel emissions show best match to carbon-14 measurements
Study findings take a dramatic step towards a greenhouse gas information system that can fundamentally change the way cities, states and the nation tackle the climate change problem. (2020-06-01)
Heightened interaction between neolithic migrants and hunter-gatherers in Western Europe
This study reports new genome-wide data for 101 prehistoric individuals from 12 archaeological sites in today's France and Germany, dating from 7000-3000 BCE, and documents levels of admixture between expanding early Neolithic farmers and local hunter-gatherers seen nowhere else in Europe. (2020-05-29)
Who were the Canaanites? New insight from 73 ancient genomes
The people who lived in the area known as the Southern Levant -- which is now recognized as Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Jordan, Lebanon, and parts of Syria -- during the Bronze Age (circa 3500-1150 BCE) are referred to in ancient biblical texts as the Canaanites. (2020-05-28)
Human mobility and Western Asia's early state-level societies
The regions of Anatolia, the Northern Levant and the Caucasus played important roles in the development of complex social and cultural models during the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age. (2020-05-28)
4,000 years of contact, conflict & cultural change had little genetic impact in Near East
The Near East was a crossroad for the ancient world's greatest civilizations, and invasions over centuries caused enormous cultural changes. (2020-05-28)
Genomic analysis shows long-term genetic mixing in West Asia before world's first cities
Scientists analyzed DNA data from 110 skeletal remains in West Asia dated 3,000 to 7,500 years ago. (2020-05-28)
Material and genetic resemblance in the Bronze Age Southern Levant
Different 'Canaanite' people from the Bronze Age Southern Levant not only culturally, but also genetically resemble each other more than other populations. (2020-05-28)
Reintroduction of wolves tied to return of tall willows in Yellowstone National Park
The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of tall willows in the park, according to a new Oregon State University-led study. (2020-05-28)
Initial Upper Paleolithic technology reached North China by ~41,000 years ago
A wave of new technology in the Late Paleolithic had reached North China by around 41,000 years ago, according to a study published May 27, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Fei Peng of the Minzu University of China, Beijing and colleagues. (2020-05-27)
7,000 years of demographic history in France
A team led by scientists from the Institut Jacques Monod (CNRS/Université de Paris)1 have shown that French prehistory was punctuated by two waves of migration: the first during the Neolithic period, about 6,300 years ago, the second during the Bronze Age, about 4,200 years ago. (2020-05-25)
Migration patterns reveal an Eden for ancient humans and animals
CU researcher, Jamie Hodgkins, Ph.D., discovered a new migration pattern (or lack of) at Pinnacle Point, a now-submerged region in South Africa. (2020-05-22)
First ancient cultivated rice discovered in Central Asia
Rice has always been one of the most important food in Asia and the world. (2020-05-21)
How the mouse conquered the house
A study, published in Scientific Reports on May 19, 2020, reconstructs the history of the biological invasion of the house mouse and reveals that the diffusion dates into Europe coincide with the first appearance of domestic cats on the continent. (2020-05-19)
Global cooling event 4,200 years ago spurred rice's evolution, spread across asia
A major global cooling event that occurred 4,200 years ago may have led to the evolution of new rice varieties and the spread of rice into both northern and southern Asia, an international team of researchers has found. (2020-05-15)
Beads made of boa bones identified in lesser Antilles
Today Boa snakes have a patchy distribution in the islands that form the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean Sea, but the constrictors are nearly absent from archaeological deposits in the region. (2020-05-14)
Cahokia's rise parallels onset of corn agriculture
Corn cultivation spread from Mesoamerica to what is now the American Southwest by about 4000 B.C., but how and when the crop made it to other parts of North America is still debated. (2020-05-14)
A lost world and extinct ecosystem
The field study site of Pinnacle Point, South Africa, sits at the center of the earliest evidence for symbolic behavior, complex pyrotechnology, projectile weapons, and the first use of foods from the sea, both geographically and scientifically, having contributed much on the evolutionary road to being a modern human. (2020-05-14)
Early humans in China innovated technology to adapt to climate change 1-million years ago
Yang and colleagues examined archaeological evidence and showed the flexibility of early hominins to ecosystem changes 1.1-1.0 million years ago. (2020-05-13)
Pofatu: A new database for geochemical 'fingerprints' of artefacts
Due to the improvement and increased use of geochemical fingerprinting techniques during the last 25 years, the archaeological compositional data of stone tools has grown exponentially. (2020-05-13)
Geometry guided construction of earliest known temple, built 6,000 years before Stonehenge
Researchers at Tel Aviv University and the Israel Antiquities Authority have now used architectural analysis to discover that geometry informed the layout of Göbekli Tepe's impressive round stone structures and enormous assembly of limestone pillars, which they say were initially planned as a single structure. (2020-05-12)
Chemical evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in Lesotho in the first millennium AD
After analyzing organic residues from ancient pots, a team of scientists led by the University of Bristol has uncovered new evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in the landlocked South African country of Lesotho in the mid-late first millennium AD. (2020-05-11)
Ancient Andes, analyzed
An international research team has conducted the first in-depth, wide-scale study of the genomic history of ancient civilizations in the central Andes mountains and coast before European contact. (2020-05-07)
Beer was here! A new microstructural marker for malting in the archaeological record
A new method for reliably identifying the presence of beer or other malted foodstuffs in archaeological finds is described in a study published May 6, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andreas G. (2020-05-07)
Ancient DNA paints genetic portrait of Andes civilizations
An international team of researchers including the University of Adelaide, has completed the first large-scale study of DNA belonging to ancient humans of the central Andes in South America and found early genetic differences between groups of nearby regions, and surprising genetic continuity over thousands of years. (2020-05-07)
Demographic expansion of several Amazonian archaeological cultures by computer simulation
Expansions by groups of humans were common during prehistoric times, after the adoption of agriculture. (2020-05-05)
Mapping glycan composition on the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein to inform vaccine design
Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, researchers have mapped glycan-processing states of the spike protein complex that allows the SARS-CoV-2 virus to infect human cells - finding that SARS-CoV-2 S glycans differ from typical host glycan processing, which may have implications in vaccine design. (2020-05-04)
Ecotourism transforms attitudes to marine conservation
A study has shown how ecotourism in the Philippines has transformed people's attitudes towards marine conservation. (2020-05-04)
During tough times, ancient 'tourists' sought solace in Florida oyster feasts
More than a thousand years ago, people from across the Southeast regularly traveled to a small island on Florida's Gulf Coast to bond over oysters, likely as a means of coping with climate change and social upheaval. (2020-05-01)
Study traces spread of early dairy farming across Western Europe
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of York, analysed the molecular remains of food left in pottery used by the first farmers who settled along the Atlantic Coast of Europe from 7,000 to 6,000 years ago. (2020-04-27)
Diverse livelihoods helped resilient Levänluhta people survive a climate disaster
A multidisciplinary research group coordinated by the University of Helsinki dated the bones of dozens of Iron Age residents of the Levänluhta site in Finland, and studied the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios. (2020-04-24)
Global changes in insect populations reflect both decline and growth
The widely reported 'insect apocalypse' is far more nuanced than previous studies have suggested, according to a new study, which reports the findings of a meta-analysis featuring data from 166 long-term surveys across 1,676 sites worldwide. (2020-04-23)
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