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Current Archaeologists News and Events

Current Archaeologists News and Events, Archaeologists News Articles.
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The short life of Must Farm
Extraordinarily well-preserved Late Bronze Age settlement in Cambridgeshire provides exceptional opportunity to investigate the everyday lives of people in the final decades of the Bronze Age in Britain. (2019-06-12)
The origins of cannabis smoking: marijuana use in the first millennium BC
Cannabis has been cultivated as an oil-seed and fiber crop for millennia in East Asia. (2019-06-12)
The origins of cannabis smoking: Marijuana use in the first millennium BC
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in the Pamir Mountains of western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. (2019-06-12)
More mysterious jars of the dead unearthed in Laos
Archaeologists have discovered 15 new sites in Laos containing more than one hundred 1,000-year-old massive stone jars possibly used for the dead. (2019-06-06)
Ancient DNA tells the story of the first herders and farmers in east Africa
A collaborative study led by archaeologists, geneticists and museum curators is providing answers to previously unsolved questions about life in sub-Saharan Africa thousands of years ago. (2019-05-30)
Ancient DNA illuminates first herders and farmers in east Africa
Genome-wide analyses of 41 ancient sub-Saharan Africans answer questions left murky by archaeological records about the origins of the people who introduced food production -- first herding and then farming -- into East Africa over the past 5,000 years. (2019-05-30)
Unique Iron Age shield gives insight into prehistoric technology
A unique bark shield, thought to have been constructed with wooden laths during the Iron Age, has provided new insight into the construction and design of prehistoric weaponry. (2019-05-23)
Cocktails with Cleopatra?
A team of scientists from Hebrew University, Israel's Antiquities Authority, Tel Aviv University and Bar-Ilan University create ancient alcohol from ancient yeast. (2019-05-22)
Abrupt climate change drove early South American population decline
Abrupt climate change some 8,000 years ago led to a dramatic decline in early South American populations, suggests new UCL research. (2019-05-09)
Ayahuasca fixings found in 1,000-year-old bundle in the Andes
Today's hipster creatives and entrepreneurs are hardly the first generation to partake of ayahuasca, according to archaeologists who have discovered traces of the powerfully hallucinogenic potion in a 1,000-year-old leather bundle buried in a cave in the Bolivian Andes. (2019-05-06)
Lost graves identified by new archaeology methods
Dr. Moffat leads a group which recently published the results of using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and GPS surveys to non-invasively map the location of unmarked graves within the Lake Condah Mission Cemetery in Eastern Australia. (2019-04-25)
Better labor practices could improve archaeological output
In a new paper, 'Essential Excavation Experts: Alienation and Agency in the History of Archaeological Labor,' published in Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, archaeologist AllisonMickel illuminates the ways that nineteenth century archaeologists working in the Middle East managed local labor in ways that reflected capitalist labor management models. (2019-04-22)
The secret to a stable society? A steady supply of beer doesn't hurt
Scientists analyzed bits of beer vessels from an ancient Peruvian brewery to learn what the beer was made of and where the materials to make the vessels came from. (2019-04-18)
Crusaders made love and war, genetic study finds
The first genetic study of ancient human remains believed to be Crusaders confirms that warriors travelled from western Europe to the near East, where they mixed and had families with local people, and died together in battle. (2019-04-18)
Switch from hunting to herding recorded in ancient pee
A new study begins to resolve the scale and pace of change during the first phases of animal domestication beyond the Fertile Crescent. (2019-04-17)
Urine salts provide evidence of Early Neolithic animal management
A close examination of midden soil layers at the early Neolithic site of A??kl? (2019-04-17)
Researchers interpret Cherokee inscriptions in Alabama cave
For the first time, a team of scholars and archaeologists has recorded and interpreted Cherokee inscriptions in Manitou Cave, Alabama. (2019-04-10)
Rise of religion pre-dates Incas at Lake Titicaca
An ancient group of people made ritual offerings to supernatural deities near the Island of the Sun in Lake Titicaca, Bolivia, about 500 years earlier than the Incas, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-04-01)
UC researchers find ancient Maya farms in Mexican wetlands
Archaeologists with the University of Cincinnati used the latest technology to find evidence suggesting ancient Maya people grew surplus crops to support an active trade with neighbors up and down the Yucatan Peninsula. (2019-03-29)
Ancient Caribbean children helped with grocery shopping in AD 400
Researchers have long thought that snail and clam shells found at Caribbean archaeological sites were evidence of 'starvation food' eaten in times when other resources were lacking. (2019-03-26)
Researchers shed new light on the origins of modern humans
The work, published in Scientific Reports, confirms a dispersal of Homo sapiens from southern to eastern Africa immediately preceded the out-of-Africa migration (2019-03-20)
Complex societies gave birth to big gods, not the other way around
Big data analyses by an international research team, including a member of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna, suggest that moralizing gods are rather the product than the drivers of social complexity. (2019-03-20)
Sea otters' tool use leaves behind distinctive archaeological evidence
An international team of researchers has analyzed the use by sea otters of large, shoreline rocks as 'anvils' to break open shells, as well as the resulting shell middens. (2019-03-14)
WSU researcher discovers oldest tattoo tool in western North America
Washington State University archaeologists have discovered the oldest tattooing artifact in western North America. (2019-02-28)
The Caucasus: Complex interplay of genes and cultures
In the Bronze Age, the Caucasus Mountains region was a cultural and genetic contact zone. (2019-02-04)
Ancient fortress reveals how prehistoric civilizations of Central Asia lived
Scientists from Russia and Uzbekistan found a unified fortification system that on the northern border of ancient Bactria. (2019-02-01)
11,500-year-old animal bones in Jordan suggest early dogs helped humans hunt
11,500 years ago in what is now northeast Jordan, people began to live alongside dogs and may also have used them for hunting, a new study from the University of Copenhagen shows. (2019-01-15)
Scientists hit on the protein and lipid composition of the Siberian mammoth bone
Scientists studied the protein and lipid composition of Siberian mammoth bone and compared it with the modern African elephant. (2019-01-09)
Surfer's ear points to ancient pearl divers in Panama
Surfer's ear, associated with cold weather and water sports, led a bioarchaeologist at the Smithsonian in Panama to suspect that ancient shoreline residents were diving for pearls in an area of cold-water upwelling. (2018-12-21)
Scientists overhaul corn domestication story with multidisciplinary analysis
Scientists are revising the history of one of the world's most important crops. (2018-12-13)
How fruit flies ended up in our fruit bowls
Fruit flies can be a scourge in our homes, but to date no-one has known how they became our uninvited lodgers. (2018-12-07)
Ancient populations from different Caucasus regions had strong social connections
Research group from Russia and the United States analyzed samples of obsidian volcanic glass in Kabardino-Balkaria. (2018-11-29)
Chipped stones and cut bones show early hominin presence in North Africa
Ancient stone tools and cut-marked animal bones discovered in Algeria suggest that modern humans' ancestors called northern Africa home much earlier than archaeologists once thought, a new study reports. (2018-11-29)
Remains of Anglo-Saxon cemetery discovered
Archaeologists from the University of Sheffield have uncovered a previously unknown Anglo-Saxon cemetery. (2018-11-27)
FEFU archaeologists have found the oldest burials in Ecuador
Archaeologists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) found three burials of the ancient inhabitants of South America aged from 6 to 10 thousand years. (2018-11-26)
Ancient human population histories revealed in Central and South America
The first high quality ancient DNA data from Central and South America -- 49 individuals some as old as 11,000 years -- has revealed a major and previously unknown exchanges between populations. (2018-11-09)
The whole tooth: New method to find biological sex from a single tooth
A team led by UC Davis researchers have come up with a new way to estimate the biological sex of human skeletal remains based on protein traces from teeth. (2018-11-09)
Major corridor of Silk Road already home to high-mountain herders over 4,000 years ago
Using ancient proteins and DNA recovered from tiny pieces of animal bone, archaeologists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (IAET) at the Russian Academy of Sciences-Siberia have discovered evidence that domestic animals -- cattle, sheep, and goat -- made their way into the high mountain corridors of southern Kyrgyzstan more than four millennia ago, as published in a study in PLOS ONE. (2018-10-31)
'Vampire burial' reveals efforts to prevent child's return from grave
Archaeologists found the remains of a 10-year-old child with a stone inserted into his or her mouth at a fifth-century Italian cemetery. (2018-10-11)
Statistical method recreates the history of a long-abandoned village
Archaeologists now have new tools for studying the development of medieval villages and the transformation of the historical landscapes surrounding them. (2018-10-09)
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