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Current Archaeologists News and Events, Archaeologists News Articles.
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Researchers find earliest evidence of milk consumption
A research team, led by archaeologists at the University of York, have identified a milk protein called beta lactoglobulin (BLG) entombed in the mineralised dental plaque of seven individuals who lived in the Neolithic period around 6,000 years-ago. (2019-09-10)
Ancient DNA study tracks formation of populations across Central Asia
Ethically sourced and informed by archaeology, an ambitious new study reports genome-wide DNA information from 523 ancient humans collected at archaeological sites across the Near East and Central and South Asia. (2019-09-05)
Humans were changing the planet earlier than we knew
Humans had caused significant landcover change on Earth up to 4000 years earlier than previously thought, University of Queensland researchers have found. (2019-08-30)
Crowdsourced archaeology shows how humans have influenced Earth for thousands of years
A new map synthesized from more than 250 archaeologists worldwide argues that the human imprint on our planet's soil goes back much earlier than the nuclear age. (2019-08-29)
Archaeological assessment reveals Earth's early transformation through land use
The first global assessment of archaeological land use changes from 10,000 BP to 1850 CE reveals that our planet was dramatically transformed from its earlier state by hunter-gatherers, farmers and pastoralists by 3,000-4,000 years ago. (2019-08-29)
Humans were changing the environment much earlier than believed
New research, which assessed global land use from 10,000 to 170 years ago, reveals that hunter-gatherers, farmers and pastoralists had made significant alterations to the planet by 4,000 years ago, much earlier than indicated by Earth scientists' previous land-use reconstructions. (2019-08-29)
Tiny ear bones help archaeologists piece together the past
For the first time archaeologists have used the small bones found in the ear to look at the health of women and children from 160 years ago. (2019-08-21)
Humans migrated to Mongolia much earlier than previously believed
Stone tools uncovered in Mongolia by an international team of archaeologists indicate that modern humans traveled across the Eurasian steppe about 45,000 years ago. (2019-08-16)
Ethiopian rock shelter earliest evidence of high-altitude prehistoric life
Archaeologists have uncovered the earliest evidence of high-altitude prehistoric living in the form of a rock shelter in Ethiopia, though whether the site was inhabited permanently is unclear. (2019-08-08)
Maya more warlike than previously thought
What was the role of warfare in Mayan civilization? New evidence from lake sediments around the abandoned city of Witzna indicates that extreme, total warfare was not just an aspect of the late Mayan period, leading to its fall, but a characteristic of intercity rivalry during the peak of Mayan culture. (2019-08-05)
Who dominates the discourse of the past?
Male academics, who comprise less than 10% of North American archaeologists, write the vast majority of the field's high impact, peer-reviewed literature. (2019-07-29)
Pottery related to unknown culture was found in Ecuador
Archaeologists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Archeology and Ethnography SB RAS (Russia), Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral (ESPOL) (Ecuador), and Tohoku University (Japan) found shards of ceramic vessels referred to the cultural sediments of early periods of Real Alto site. (2019-07-24)
Archaeological evidence verifies long-doubted medieval accounts of First Crusade
New discoveries in the decade-long archaeological dig at Jerusalem's Mont Zion include a massive, long-rumored-but-buried earthwork, gold jewelry and war artifacts. (2019-07-22)
Nuclear physics in search of world artifacts
NUST MISIS scientists together with the colleagues from PN Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics Lomonosov Moscow State University and Dagestan State University have published the first results of a 'scan' obtained by the method of muon radiography of the underground space in the Derbent fortress of Naryn-Kala. (2019-07-10)
Neurosciences unlock the secret of the first abstract engravings
Long before Lascaux paintings, humans engraved abstract motifs on stones. (2019-07-03)
Neanderthals used resin 'glue' to craft their stone tools
Archaeologists working in two Italian caves have discovered some of the earliest known examples of ancient humans using an adhesive on their stone tools -- an important technological advance called 'hafting.' (2019-06-26)
Levänluhta jewellery links Finland to a European exchange network
A recently completed study indicates that the material of the jewellery found together with human remains at the Levänluhta water burial site originates in southern Europe, contrary to what researchers had previously thought. (2019-06-25)
Woodstock really was a free-wheeling festival, new archeological research shows
The Woodstock Music Festival celebrates its 50th anniversary this summer, and new archaeological research from Binghamton University, State University of New York shows that the iconic event took on a life of its own. (2019-06-24)
The short life of Must Farm
Extraordinarily well-preserved Late Bronze Age settlement in Cambridgeshire provides exceptional opportunity to investigate the everyday lives of people in the final decades of the Bronze Age in Britain. (2019-06-12)
The origins of cannabis smoking: marijuana use in the first millennium BC
Cannabis has been cultivated as an oil-seed and fiber crop for millennia in East Asia. (2019-06-12)
The origins of cannabis smoking: Marijuana use in the first millennium BC
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in the Pamir Mountains of western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. (2019-06-12)
More mysterious jars of the dead unearthed in Laos
Archaeologists have discovered 15 new sites in Laos containing more than one hundred 1,000-year-old massive stone jars possibly used for the dead. (2019-06-06)
Ancient DNA tells the story of the first herders and farmers in east Africa
A collaborative study led by archaeologists, geneticists and museum curators is providing answers to previously unsolved questions about life in sub-Saharan Africa thousands of years ago. (2019-05-30)
Ancient DNA illuminates first herders and farmers in east Africa
Genome-wide analyses of 41 ancient sub-Saharan Africans answer questions left murky by archaeological records about the origins of the people who introduced food production -- first herding and then farming -- into East Africa over the past 5,000 years. (2019-05-30)
Unique Iron Age shield gives insight into prehistoric technology
A unique bark shield, thought to have been constructed with wooden laths during the Iron Age, has provided new insight into the construction and design of prehistoric weaponry. (2019-05-23)
Cocktails with Cleopatra?
A team of scientists from Hebrew University, Israel's Antiquities Authority, Tel Aviv University and Bar-Ilan University create ancient alcohol from ancient yeast. (2019-05-22)
Abrupt climate change drove early South American population decline
Abrupt climate change some 8,000 years ago led to a dramatic decline in early South American populations, suggests new UCL research. (2019-05-09)
Ayahuasca fixings found in 1,000-year-old bundle in the Andes
Today's hipster creatives and entrepreneurs are hardly the first generation to partake of ayahuasca, according to archaeologists who have discovered traces of the powerfully hallucinogenic potion in a 1,000-year-old leather bundle buried in a cave in the Bolivian Andes. (2019-05-06)
Lost graves identified by new archaeology methods
Dr. Moffat leads a group which recently published the results of using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and GPS surveys to non-invasively map the location of unmarked graves within the Lake Condah Mission Cemetery in Eastern Australia. (2019-04-25)
Better labor practices could improve archaeological output
In a new paper, 'Essential Excavation Experts: Alienation and Agency in the History of Archaeological Labor,' published in Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, archaeologist AllisonMickel illuminates the ways that nineteenth century archaeologists working in the Middle East managed local labor in ways that reflected capitalist labor management models. (2019-04-22)
The secret to a stable society? A steady supply of beer doesn't hurt
Scientists analyzed bits of beer vessels from an ancient Peruvian brewery to learn what the beer was made of and where the materials to make the vessels came from. (2019-04-18)
Crusaders made love and war, genetic study finds
The first genetic study of ancient human remains believed to be Crusaders confirms that warriors travelled from western Europe to the near East, where they mixed and had families with local people, and died together in battle. (2019-04-18)
Switch from hunting to herding recorded in ancient pee
A new study begins to resolve the scale and pace of change during the first phases of animal domestication beyond the Fertile Crescent. (2019-04-17)
Urine salts provide evidence of Early Neolithic animal management
A close examination of midden soil layers at the early Neolithic site of A??kl? (2019-04-17)
Researchers interpret Cherokee inscriptions in Alabama cave
For the first time, a team of scholars and archaeologists has recorded and interpreted Cherokee inscriptions in Manitou Cave, Alabama. (2019-04-10)
Rise of religion pre-dates Incas at Lake Titicaca
An ancient group of people made ritual offerings to supernatural deities near the Island of the Sun in Lake Titicaca, Bolivia, about 500 years earlier than the Incas, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-04-01)
UC researchers find ancient Maya farms in Mexican wetlands
Archaeologists with the University of Cincinnati used the latest technology to find evidence suggesting ancient Maya people grew surplus crops to support an active trade with neighbors up and down the Yucatan Peninsula. (2019-03-29)
Ancient Caribbean children helped with grocery shopping in AD 400
Researchers have long thought that snail and clam shells found at Caribbean archaeological sites were evidence of 'starvation food' eaten in times when other resources were lacking. (2019-03-26)
Researchers shed new light on the origins of modern humans
The work, published in Scientific Reports, confirms a dispersal of Homo sapiens from southern to eastern Africa immediately preceded the out-of-Africa migration (2019-03-20)
Complex societies gave birth to big gods, not the other way around
Big data analyses by an international research team, including a member of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna, suggest that moralizing gods are rather the product than the drivers of social complexity. (2019-03-20)
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