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Current Arctic News and Events, Arctic News Articles.
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Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers
A large number of the valley networks scarring Mars's surface were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought, according to new UBC research published today in Nature Geoscience. (2020-08-03)
Increasing Arctic freshwater is driven by climate change
New, first-of-its-kind research from the University of Colorado Boulder shows that climate change is driving increasing amounts of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean. (2020-07-30)
Newer PFAS compound detected for first time in Arctic seawater
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), found in many household products and food packages, have raised concerns because of their persistence and possible toxicity to people and wildlife. (2020-07-29)
A snapshot of melting Arctic sea ice during the summer of 2018
A study appearing July 29 in the journal Heliyon details the changes that occurred in the Arctic in September of 2018, a year when nearly 10 million kilometers of sea ice were lost throughout the summer. (2020-07-29)
New technique enables mineral ID of precious Antarctic micrometeorites
The composition of Antarctic micrometeorites and other tiny but precious rocks such as those from space missions--is really hard to analyze without some sample loss. (2020-07-28)
New depth map of the Arctic Ocean
An international team of researchers has published the most detailed submarine map of the Artic Ocean. (2020-07-27)
Ocean features and changes in the past are explored to anticipate future climate
The Quaternary International journal has published a study by the UPV/EHU's Department of Stratigraphy and Palaeontology describing, in detail, the climate changes taking place in the Bay of Biscay over the last 37,000 years. (2020-07-24)
Alaska is getting wetter. That's bad news for permafrost and the climate.
Alaska is getting wetter. A new study spells out what that means for the permafrost that underlies about 85% of the state, and the consequences for Earth's global climate. (2020-07-24)
Where are arctic mosquitoes most abundant in Greenland and why?
Bzz! It's mosquito season in Greenland. June and July is when Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) are in peak abundance, buzzing about the tundra. (2020-07-23)
What happens in Vegas, may come from the Arctic?
Ancient climate records from Leviathan Cave, located in the southern Great Basin, show that Nevada was even hotter and drier in the past than it is today, and that one 4,000-year period in particular may represent a true, ''worst-case'' scenario picture for the Southwest and the Colorado River Basin -- and the millions of people who rely on its water supply. (2020-07-22)
St Petersburg University scientists count all the tiny snails in the Arctic
St Petersburg University Scientists have summarised all the known information about Arctic snails that have dimensions less than five millimetres. (2020-07-17)
Arctic Ocean changes driven by sub-Arctic seas
New research explores how lower-latitude oceans drive complex changes in the Arctic Ocean, pushing the region into a new reality distinct from the 20th-century norm. (2020-07-10)
Arctic Ocean 'regime shift'
Stanford scientists find the growth of phytoplankton in the Arctic Ocean has increased 57 percent over just two decades, enhancing its ability to soak up carbon dioxide. (2020-07-09)
First Alaskan juvenile predator fossil adds insight to dino migration
The discovery of the first juvenile dromaeosaurid lower jaw bone on the North Slope of Alaska supports a growing theory that some Cretaceous Arctic dinosaurs did not migrate with the seasons but were year-round residents, according to new research by SMU paleontologist Anthony Fiorillo. (2020-07-08)
Climate change may cause extreme waves in Arctic
Extreme ocean surface waves with a devastating impact on coastal communities and infrastructure in the Arctic may become larger due to climate change, according to a new study. (2020-07-07)
The latest findings on the MOSAiC floe
The New Siberian Islands were the birthplace of the MOSAiC floe: the sea ice in which the research vessel Polarstern is now drifting through the Arctic was formed off the coast of the archipelago, which separates the East Siberian Sea and the Laptev Sea to the north of Siberia, in December 2018. (2020-07-05)
Arctic plants may not provide predicted carbon sequestration potential
The environmental benefits of taller, shrubbier tundra plants in the Arctic may be overstated, according to new research involving the University of Stirling. (2020-07-02)
In the Arctic, spring snowmelt triggers fresh CO2 production
Studies have shown the Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the rest of the world, and its soil holds twice the amount of carbon dioxide as the atmosphere. (2020-07-01)
Spider baby boom in a warmer Arctic
Climate change leads to longer growing seasons in the Arctic. (2020-06-25)
Sledge dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'
Sledge dogs are much older and have adapted to Arctic conditions much earlier than previously thought. (2020-06-25)
Antarctic penguins happier with less sea ice
Researchers have been surprised to find that Adélie penguins in Antarctica prefer reduced sea-ice conditions, not just a little bit, but a lot. (2020-06-24)
UM researcher helps reveal changes in water of Canadian arctic
Melting of Arctic ice due to climate change has exposed more sea surface to an atmosphere with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide. (2020-06-24)
Stocks of vulnerable carbon twice as high where permafrost subsidence is factored in
Twice as much carbon in permafrost is vulnerable to microbial respiration when researchers from Northern Arizona University accounted for subsidence, the gradual sinking of terrain caused by loss of ice and soil mass. (2020-06-17)
Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected
Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected. (2020-06-17)
Carbon emission from permafrost soils underestimated by 14%
Picture 500 million cars stacked in rows. That's how much carbon -- about 1,000 petagrams, or one billion metric tons - -is locked away in Arctic permafrost. (2020-06-15)
A carbon sink shrinks in the arctic
Ice melts in the Arctic Ocean were thought to be drawing large amounts of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, acting as a carbon sink and helping to mitigate greenhouse gases. (2020-06-15)
Antarctic sea-ice models improve for the next IPCC report
All the new coupled climate models project that the area of sea ice around Antarctica will decline by 2100, but the amount of loss varies considerably between the emissions scenarios. (2020-06-10)
Proposed seismic surveys in Arctic Refuge likely to cause lasting damage
Winter vehicle travel can cause long-lasting damage to the tundra, according to a new paper by University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers. (2020-06-10)
Patterns in permafrost soils could help climate change models
A team of scientists spent the past four summers measuring permafrost soils across a 5,000 square-mile swath of Alaska's North Slope. (2020-06-08)
A tiny arctic shrub reveals secrets of plant growth on Svalbard
It's not easy being a tiny willow on the wind-and snow-blasted islands of the Norwegian territory of Svalbard. (2020-06-05)
New study reveals cracks beneath giant, methane gushing craters
250-million-year-old cracks in the seafloor feed greenhouse gas methane into giant craters in the Barents Sea. (2020-06-04)
Here be methane: Skoltech scientists investigate the origins of a gaping permafrost crater
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues spent more than two years studying a 20-meter wide and 20-meter deep crater in the Yamal Peninsula in northern Russia that formed after an explosive release of gas, mostly methane, from the permafrost. (2020-06-03)
UNH researchers find wildfires can alter arctic watersheds for 50 years
Climate change has contributed to the increase in the number of wildfires in the Arctic and can dramatically shift stream chemistry. (2020-05-28)
Finding a genus home for Alaska's dinosaurs
A re-analysis of dinosaur skulls from northern Alaska suggests they belong to a genus Edmontosaurus, and not to the genus recently proposed by scientists in 2015. (2020-05-27)
Scientists take first census of Arctic freshwater molluscs in 130 years
Based on previously released data and their own investigations, researchers at the St Petersburg University Laboratory of Macroecology and Biogeography of Invertebrates have assessed the diversity of freshwater molluscs in the Circumpolar region of the World. (2020-05-25)
New map reveals global scope of groundwater arsenic risk
Up to 220 million people worldwide, with approximately 94% of them in Asia, could be at risk of drinking well water containing harmful levels of arsenic, a tasteless, odorless and naturally occurring poison. (2020-05-21)
Fishing rod 'selfie stick' and scientific sleuthing turn up clues to extinct sea reptile
A Russian paleontologist visiting the Natural History Museum in London desperately wanted a good look at the skeleton of an extinct aquatic reptile, but its glass case was too far up the wall. (2020-05-19)
Analysis of bird species reveals how wings adapted to their environment and behavior
Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behavior, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements, led by the University of Bristol. (2020-05-18)
Story tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection
ORNL story Tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection. (2020-05-18)
Ozone-depleting chemical alternatives getting into our food and water
An international environmental agreement to regulate the use of chemicals depleting the ozone layer may have inadvertently allowed higher levels of other harmful chemicals to flourish, new research co-led by York University and Environment and Climate Change Canada has found. (2020-05-14)
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