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Current Arsenic News and Events

Current Arsenic News and Events, Arsenic News Articles.
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Study finds high levels of toxic pollutants in stranded dolphins and whales
Researchers examined toxins in tissue concentrations and pathology data from 83 stranded dolphins and whales from 2012 to 2018. (2020-08-06)
Tracking humanity's latest toxins in stranded whales and dolphins
As humanity develops new types of plastics and chemicals, researchers are constantly trying to keep up with understanding how these contaminants affect the environment and wildlife. (2020-08-05)
Finding toxic carcinogenic metals faster in foods and water
Finding out if the food and water we consume are safe from toxic and carcinogenic metals can now be much faster and simpler. (2020-08-04)
Increased global mortality linked to arsenic exposure in rice-based diets
Rice is the most widely consumed staple food source for a large part of the world's population. (2020-08-04)
Leukemia drug shows the potential to treat aggressive pediatric brain câncer
When tested in vitro, arsenic trioxide killed tumor cells and prevented the formation of new colonies. (2020-07-21)
Hammer-on technique for atomic vibrations in a crystal
Vibrations of atoms in a crystal of the semiconductor gallium arsenide (GaAs) are impulsively shifted to a higher frequency by an optically excited electric current. (2020-07-14)
Invisible defence against adenoviruses
An adenovirus infection can be potentially life-threatening, especially for children after a stem cell transplant. (2020-07-13)
Southwestern correctional facilities' drinking water puts inmate health at risk
The first nationwide analysis of drinking water quality in United States correctional facilities found average arsenic concentrations in drinking water in Southwestern United States correctional facilities were twice as high as average arsenic concentrations in other Southwest community drinking water systems. (2020-06-22)
Tiger snakes tell more about local wetlands' pollution levels
Tiger snakes living in Perth's urban wetlands are accumulating toxic heavy metals in their livers, suggesting that their habitats -- critical, local ecosystems -- are contaminated and the species may be suffering as a result. (2020-06-02)
Contamined soils determined root characteristics
University of Cordoba Professor Rafael Villar participated in a study on the variation of root traits among Mediterranean trees planted in metal-contaminated soil (2020-05-29)
'Black nitrogen'
In the periodic table of elements there is one golden rule for carbon, oxygen, and other light elements. (2020-05-29)
New map reveals global scope of groundwater arsenic risk
Up to 220 million people worldwide, with approximately 94% of them in Asia, could be at risk of drinking well water containing harmful levels of arsenic, a tasteless, odorless and naturally occurring poison. (2020-05-21)
Clay layers and distant pumping trigger arsenic contamination in Bangladesh groundwater
To avoid arsenic contamination, many Bangladeshi households access water via private wells drilled to 300 feet or less, beneath impermeable clay layers. (2020-05-07)
Half of UK rice breaches limits on arsenic for children, warn scientists
Scientists have called for labelling to warn the public about levels of arsenic in rice, after their research found half of rice varieties studied exceeded maximum limits on the deadly toxin. (2020-05-01)
Graphene heterostructures with black phosphorus, arsenic enable new infrared detectors
MIPT scientists and their colleagues from Japan and the U.S. (2020-04-13)
River-groundwater hot spot for arsenic
Naturally occurring groundwater arsenic contamination is a problem of global significance, particularly in South and Southeast Asian aquifers. (2020-04-07)
Co-occurring contaminants may increase NC groundwater risks
Eighty-four percent of the wells sampled in the Kings Mountain Belt and the Charlotte and Milton Belts of the Piedmont region of North Carolina contained concentrations of vanadium and hexavalent chromium that exceeded health recommendations from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. (2020-03-24)
Natural organic matter influences arsenic release into groundwater
Millions of people worldwide consume water contaminated with levels of arsenic that exceed those recommended by the World Health Organization. (2020-03-11)
New study finds inaccuracies in arsenic test kits in Bangladesh
Researchers at the University of Michigan have raised serious concerns with the performance of some arsenic test kits commonly used in Bangladesh to monitor water contamination. (2020-03-04)
Bayreuth researchers discover new arsenic compounds in rice fields
University of Bayreuth researchers, together with scientists from Italy and China, have for the first time sys-tematically investigated under which conditions, and to what extent, sulphur-containing arsenic com-pounds are formed in rice-growing soils. (2020-02-11)
Kids rice snacks in Australia contain arsenic above EU guidelines: Study
Three out of four rice-based products tested have concentrations of arsenic that exceed the EU guideline for safe rice consumption for babies and toddlers. (2020-01-21)
Advanced polymers help streamline water purification, environmental remediation
It takes a lot of energy to collect, clean and dispose of contaminated water. (2020-01-21)
Isotopically enriched cubic boron nitride reveals high thermal conductivity
An international team of physicists, materials scientists, and mechanical engineers has confirmed the high thermal conductivity predicted in isotopically enriched cubic boron nitride, the researchers report in the electronic edition of the journal Science. c-BN is particularly challenging to make and it's difficult to measure its thermal conductivity accurately when the value is high. (2020-01-13)
Trace Metals in Leatherback Turtle Eggs May Harm Consumers
Leatherback turtle eggs in the Panamanian Caribbean may be harmful to the health of consumers, due to the concentrations of trace metals found in them. (2020-01-10)
Toward a smarter way of recharging the aquifer
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis have solved a mystery: how did arsenic show up in aquifer water that had been triple purified? (2020-01-09)
It's a small (coal-polluted) world, after all
A study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry underscores that the release of pollutants in one region can have implications beyond its borders; emphasizing the dire need for global collaboration on environmental issues. (2019-12-20)
Warmer temperatures will increase arsenic levels in rice, study shows
UW researchers have found that warmer temperatures, at levels expected under most climate change projections, can lead to higher concentrations of arsenic in rice grains. (2019-12-04)
Rice yields plummet and arsenic rises in future climate-soil scenarios
Research combining future climate conditions and arsenic-induced soil stresses predicts rice yields could decline about 40 percent by 2100, a loss that would impact about 2 billion people dependent on the global crop. (2019-11-01)
Bacterial arsenic efflux genes enabled plants to transport boron efficiently
- Nodulin26-like-intrinsic-proteins (NIPs) are essential for the transport of silicon and boron in plants. (2019-10-30)
Otherworldly worms with three sexes discovered in Mono Lake
The extreme environment of Mono Lake was thought to only house two species of animals -- until now. (2019-09-26)
No clear link between local food and cancer risk in glassworks areas
There is no clear link between cancer incidence and locally produced food from an area with a history of glass manufacture with contaminated soil, according to a new study from, among others, Linköping University in Sweden. (2019-09-23)
Tougher arsenic standard shows desired effect: Public's drinking water is safer
Toughening the federal standard for arsenic in 2001 has led to fewer violations by the public systems that supply more than 80 percent of the United States' drinking water, research led by Oregon State University shows. (2019-09-10)
Physicists from IKBFU create metallic alloy for magnetic refrigerator
Physicists of the Laboratory of Novel Magnetic Materials of the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University study magnetic materials and magnetostructural phase transition in order to create a new magnetic cooling technology. (2019-07-25)
Evidence of multiple unmonitored coal ash spills found in N.C. lake
Coal ash solids in sediments collected from Sutton Lake in 2015 and 2018 suggest the North Carolina lake has been contaminated by multiple coal-ash spills, most of them apparently unmonitored and unreported. (2019-06-03)
Families with a higher socioeconomic position have a greater risk of exposure to chemicals
A European study analyses the exposure of 1,300 mothers and their children to 41 different chemical contaminants (2019-05-13)
Arsenic in drinking water may change heart structure
Among young adults, drinking water contaminated with arsenic may lead to structural changes in the heart that raise their risk of heart disease. (2019-05-07)
Arsenic in drinking water may change heart structure raising risk of heart disease
Drinking water that is contaminated with arsenic may lead to thickening of the heart's main pumping chamber in young adults, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. (2019-05-07)
Study identifies better, cheaper ways to stem arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh
An analysis compares four methods of dealing with arsenic contamination in Bangladesh, and pinpoints strategies to deliver cleaner water to the greatest number of people at the lowest cost. (2019-05-07)
Resolving the 'invisible' gold puzzle
In Carlin-type gold deposits, which make up 75% of the US production, gold does not occur in the form of nuggets or veins, but is hidden -- together with arsenic -- in pyrite, also known as 'fool's gold.' A team of scientists has now shown for the first time that the concentration of gold directly depends on the content of arsenic in the pyrite. (2019-05-01)
Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean
In low-oxygen parts of the ocean, some microbes are surviving by getting energy from arsenic. (2019-05-01)
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