Current Bacteria News and Events

Current Bacteria News and Events, Bacteria News Articles.
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Experimental evolution reveals how bacteria gain drug resistance
A research team at RIKEN in Japan has succeeded in experimentally evolving the common bacteria under pressure from a large number of individual antibiotics, and identified the mechanisms and constraints underlying evolved drug resistance. Their findings help develop drug-treatment strategies that minimize the chance that bacteria will develop resistance. (2020-11-24)

How moving slower allows groups of bacteria to spread across surfaces
Scientists have found that bacterial groups spread more rapidly over surfaces when the individuals inside them move slowly, a discovery that may shed light on how bacteria spread within the body during infections. (2020-11-23)

Social bacteria build shelters using the physics of fingerprints
When starvation threatens, forest-dwelling Myxococcus xanthus bacteria work collectively to form fruiting bodies, spongy mushroom-like growths that promote survival. Princeton researchers have identified how these bacteria harness the same physical laws that lead to the whorls of a fingerprint to build the structures layer by layer. (2020-11-23)

Gut-brain axis influences multiple sclerosis
A Basel-led international research team has discovered a connection between the intestinal flora and sites of inflammation in the central nervous system in multiple sclerosis. A specific class of immune cell plays a central role in this newly identified gut-brain axis. The discovery could pave the way for new treatments for MS that target the intestinal flora. (2020-11-20)

Gut immune cells may help send MS into remission
An international research team led by UCSF scientists has shown, for the first time, that gut immune cells travel to the brain during multiple sclerosis (MS) flare-ups in patients. These gut cells seem to be playing a protective role, helping drive MS symptoms back into remission. (2020-11-20)

Bed dust microorganisms may boost children's health
In the most extensive study of its kind, researchers from the University of Copenhagen, in collaboration with the Danish Pediatric Asthma Center at Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, have found a link between microorganisms living in the dust of children's beds and the children's own bacteria. The correlation suggests that microorganisms may reduce a child's risk of developing asthma, allergies and autoimmune diseases later on in life. (2020-11-19)

Giant aquatic bacterium is a master of adaptation
The largest freshwater bacterium, Achromatium oxaliferum, is highly flexible in its requirements, as researchers led by the IGB have now discovered: It lives in places that differ extremely in environmental conditions such as hot springs and ice water. The adaptation is probably achieved by a process which is unique to these bacteria: only relevant genes are enriched in the genomes and transcribed, while others are archived in cell compartments. (2020-11-19)

Insights in the search for new antibiotics
A collaborative research team from the University of Oklahoma, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Merck & Co. published an opinion article in the journal, Nature Chemical Biology, that addresses the gap in the discovery of new antibiotics. (2020-11-19)

The gut microbiota forms a molecule that can contribute to diabetes progression
It is the bacterial changes in the gut that increase the levels of imidazole propionate, the molecule that makes the body's cells resistant to insulin in type 2 diabetes. This result emerges from a European study, MetaCardis. (2020-11-18)

Gut microbiome manipulation could result from virus discovery
Scientists have discovered how a common virus in the human gut infects and takes over bacterial cells - a finding that could be used to control the composition of the gut microbiome, which is important for human health. The Rutgers co-authored research, which could aid efforts to engineer beneficial bacteria that produce medicines and fuels and clean up pollutants, is published in the journal Nature. (2020-11-18)

Compound for Alzheimer's combats bacterial resistance to last-resort antibiotics in mice
An experimental drug for neurodegenerative diseases can also reverse resistance to ''last-resort'' polymyxin antibiotics among bacteria that cause sepsis, a life-threatening complication from infections. (2020-11-18)

Bacteria convince their squid host to create a less hostile work environment
Bacteria living symbiotically within the Hawaiian bobtail squid can direct the host squid to change its normal gene-expression program to make a more inviting home, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Hawai'i. (2020-11-18)

Cellular powerplant recycles waste gases
Carbon monoxide is a very poisonous gas. Humans die within minutes when they inhale it. However, some microorganisms tolerate carbon monoxide. Knowledge about how these bacteria survive opens a window into the primeval times of the earth and the origin of life. At the same time, they might be useful for the future as they can be used to clean waste gases and produce biofuels. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have now made a surprising discovery. (2020-11-16)

Link between Alzheimer's disease and gut microbiota is confirmed
In recent years, the scientific community has suspected that the gut microbiota plays a role in the development of the disease. A team from the University and the Hospital of Geneva the National Research and, University and IRCCS SDN Research Center of Naples, confirm the correlation, in humans, between an imbalance in the gut microbiota and the development of amyloid plaques in the brain, which are at the origin of Alzheimer's disease. (2020-11-13)

Light shed on the atomic resolution structure of phage DNA tube
Given that phages are able to destroy bacteria, they are of particular interest to science. Basic researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin are especially interested in the tube used by phages to implant their DNA into bacteria. In collaboration with colleagues from Forschungszentrum Jülich and Jena University Hospital, they have now revealed the 3D structure of this crucial phage component in atomic resolution. (2020-11-13)

Researchers find connection between household chemicals and gut microbiome
A team of researchers for the first time has found a correlation between the levels of bacteria and fungi in the gastrointestinal tract of children and the amount of common chemicals found in their home environment. The work, published this month in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, could lead to better understanding of how these semi-volatile organic compounds may affect human health. (2020-11-12)

Scientists use bacteria as micro-3D printers
A team at Aalto University has used bacteria to produce intricately designed three-dimensional objects made of nanocellulose. With their technique, the researchers are able to guide the growth of bacterial colonies through the use of strongly water repellent -- or superhydrophobic -- surfaces. (2020-11-10)

Oil-eating worms provide valuable assistance in soil remediation
Bionanotechnology Lab of Kazan Federal University works on adapting nematodes to consuming oil waste. Co-author, Chief Research Associate Rawil Fakhrullin explains, 'We've improved existing methods of biological remediation of soils. Our lab experiment was successful, and we have a new way of delivering oil-consuming bacteria into the soil.' (2020-11-09)

RUDN University soil scientist: Deforestation affects the bacterial composition of the soil
A soil scientist from RUDN University studied the effect of forest conversion on the properties of the soil: its acidity, carbon and nitrogen resources, bacterial composition, and the activity of microorganisms. The study can help improve the methods of soil cultivation after deforestation, namely, select the best fertilizers, prevent erosion, slow down nutrient depletion, and balance the composition of the bacterial community. (2020-11-09)

Researchers discover bacterial DNA's recipe for success
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a way of modeling how potentially beneficial packages of DNA called plasmids circulate and accumulate through a complex environment that includes many bacterial species. The researchers hope that their new model will lay the groundwork for others to better model and predict how important traits such as antibiotic resistance in pathogens or metabolic abilities in bacteria bred to clean environmental pollution will spread and grow in a given environment. (2020-11-09)

Yin and Yang: Two signaling molecules control growth and behavior in bacteria
Bacteria are considered to be true experts in survival. Their rapid adaptive response to changing environmental conditions is based, among other things, on two competing signaling molecules. As the 'Yin and Yang' of metabolic control they decide on the lifestyle of bacteria, as reported by researchers from the University of Basel. The new findings also play a role in the context of bacterial infections. (2020-11-09)

Princeton researchers find key to piercing harmful bacteria's armor
Princeton University researchers have identified a new bacterial protein that assists in delivering components to the outer membrane of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, as they report in recent papers in PNAS and Trends in Microbiology. (2020-11-09)

Researchers identify new Rickettsia species in dogs
Researchers have identified a new species of Rickettsia bacteria that may cause significant disease in dogs and humans. This new yet unnamed species, initially identified in three dogs, is part of the spotted-fever group Rickettsia which includes Rickettsia rickettsii, the bacteria that cause Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF). (2020-11-09)

Plastics and rising CO2 levels could pose combined threat to marine environment
An international team of scientists found that after three weeks of being submerged in the ocean, the bacterial diversity on plastic bottles was twice as great as on samples collected from the surrounding seawater (2020-11-06)

Mystery molecule in bacteria is revealed to be a guard
Unusual structures in bacterial cells keep viral infection from spreading; a list of new ones could provide improved biotech tools. (2020-11-05)

New research traces the origins of trench fever
Trench fever was first clinically described in World War 1 when it sickened nearly 500,000 soldiers. New DNA evidence proves the disease predates that time period by thousands of years. (2020-11-04)

????Strain of rhizobacteria shown to naturally and sustainably promote rice growth
''Our study has demonstrated that B. pumilus LZP02 colonizes rice roots and promotes growth by improving carbohydrate metabolism and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis,'' explained Zhigang Wang, one of the scientists involved in the research. ''These findings show a new light on how microbes and plants communicate in a friendly way.'' (2020-11-04)

Ants swallow their own acid to protect themselves from germs
Ants use their own acid to disinfect themselves and their stomachs. A team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the University of Bayreuth has found that formic acid kills harmful bacteria in the animal's food, thereby reducing the risk of disease. At the same time, the acid significantly influences the ant's intestinal flora. The new study was published in the journal eLife. (2020-11-03)

Hungry plants rely on their associated bacteria to mobilize unavailable iron
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research have found that, faced with limiting iron, plants direct their microbiota to mobilise this essential nutrient for optimal growth. (2020-11-02)

Follow your gut: How farms protect from childhood asthma
Asthma impacts millions of children already at a young age. Children growing up on a farm have a lower risk of developing asthma than children not living on a farm. The mechanisms behind this protective farm effect on childhood asthma are largely unknown. A group of researchers from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital of Ludwig Maximilians University Munich (LMU) clarified how the children's gut microbiome is involved in the protection process. (2020-11-02)

In your gut: How bacteria survive low oxygen environments
Researchers from ITQB NOVA, in collaboration with the Institut Pasteur in Paris, have shed light on the mechanisms that allow Clostridioides difficile, a pathogen that can only grow in oxygen-free environments, to survive low oxygen levels. C. difficile is a major cause of intestinal problems associated with the use of antibiotics, causing an estimated number of 124k cases per year in the EU, costing on average 5k€ per patient, as a direct consequence of healthcare-associated contagion. (2020-11-02)

A new lead for disarming antibiotic-resistant bacteria
A virus can stop bacteria from sharing genes for antibiotic resistance among themselves, Texas A&M AgriLife researchers have discovered. The results hint at new ways to treat infections and describe a new feature of a highly diverse, largely unexplored part of the biosphere. (2020-11-02)

Decaying jellyfish blooms can cause temporary changes to water column food webs
Decaying jellyfish blooms fuel the rapid growth of just a few specific strains of seawater bacteria, causing temporary changes to the water column food web. This is the finding of a new study furthering our understanding of how jellyfish blooms, which are happening with increasing frequency, impact marine ecosystems. It details these fast-growing bacteria effectively reduce the amount of jellyfish detrital material reaching the seafloor, keeping it instead within the water column food web. (2020-10-30)

Microbes in the gut could be protective against hazardous radiation exposure
A study by scientists at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and colleagues showed that mice exposed to potentially lethal levels of total body radiation were protected from radiation damage if they had specific types of bacteria in their gut. They demonstrated that the bacteria mitigated radiation exposure and enhanced the recovery of blood cell production as well as repair of the gastrointestinal tract. (2020-10-30)

Coral researchers find link between bacterial genus and disease susceptibility
Corals that appear healthy are more prone to getting sick when they're home to too many parasitic bacteria, new research at Oregon State University shows. (2020-10-28)

Genetic analysis system yields new insights into bacterial pneumonia
A team of infectious disease researchers has developed a new method to identify virulence genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia. Using this technique in a mouse model of pneumonia, they were able to gain new insights into the progression of the disease and its interaction with the flu virus. (2020-10-28)

High-sugar diet can damage the gut, intensifying risk for colitis
DALLAS - Oct. 28, 2020 - Mice fed diets high in sugar developed worse colitis, a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and researchers examining their large intestines found more of the bacteria that can damage the gut's protective mucus layer. (2020-10-28)

Severe form of Inflammatory Bowel Disease linked to a strain of mouth bacteria
Bacteria from the mouth could hold clues to understanding - and potentially treating - severe ulcerative colitis, a painful bowel disease. (2020-10-28)

The sweet spot of flagellar assembly
To build the machinery that enables bacteria to swim the flagellum is assembled piece by piece, ending with the helix called flagellar filament, composed of six different subunits called flagellins. Microbiologists from the University of Geneva have demonstrated that adding sugar to the flagellins is crucial for the flagellum's assembly and functionality. Among the six flagellins, one is the special one serving a signalling role to trigger the final assembly of the flagellum. (2020-10-27)

Genetic analysis of B. infantis strains reveal functional superiority of activated EVC001 in infants
When it comes to infant probiotics the strain matters. The genetic analysis of a key infant gut bacteria B. infantis, reveals superiority of activated EVC001 strain to provide health benefits to babies. (2020-10-27)

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