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Current Bacteria News and Events

Current Bacteria News and Events, Bacteria News Articles.
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Phylogenetic analysis forces rethink of termite evolution
Despite their important ecological role as decomposers, termites are often overlooked in research. (2019-10-17)
Many cooks don't spoil the broth: Manifold symbionts prepare the host for any eventuality
Deep-sea mussels, which rely on symbiotic bacteria for food, harbor a surprisingly high diversity of these bacterial 'cooks': Up to 16 different bacterial strains live in the mussel's gills, each with its own abilities and strengths. (2019-10-15)
Genetic differences in the immune system shape the microbiome
Genetic differences in the immune system shape the collections of bacteria that colonize the digestive system, according to new research by scientists at the University of Chicago. (2019-10-15)
Scientists develop cell-material feedback platform for small-scale biologics production
YOU Lingchong, a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Duke University, and Associate Professor DAI Zhuojun at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a concise platform to achieve versatile production together with analysis and purification of diverse proteins and protein complexes by exploiting cell-material feedback. (2019-10-15)
A reliable clock for your microbiome
The microbiome is a treasure trove of information about human health and disease, but getting it to reveal its secrets is challenging. (2019-10-11)
Bacteria contradict Darwin: Survival of the friendliest
New microbial research at the University of Copenhagen suggests that 'survival of the friendliest' outweighs 'survival of the fittest' for groups of bacteria. (2019-10-11)
Compound in breast milk fights harmful bacteria
A compound in human breast milk fights infections by harmful bacteria while allowing beneficial bacteria to thrive, according to researchers at National Jewish Health and the University of Iowa. (2019-10-10)
A Lego-like approach to improve nature's own ability to kill dangerous bacteria
In a paper recently published in Biomacromolecules, a Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute research team demonstrated how it could improve upon the ability of nature's exquisitely selective collection of antimicrobial enzymes to attack bacteria in a way that's much less likely to cause bacterial resistance. (2019-10-10)
mpacts of low-dose exposure to antibiotics unveiled in zebrafish gut
An antibiotic commonly found at low concentrations in the environment can have major impacts on gut bacteria, report researchers at the University of Oregon. (2019-10-10)
Researchers use game theory to successfully identify bacterial antibiotic resistance
Washington State University researchers have developed a novel way to identify previously unrecognized antibiotic-resistance genes in bacteria. (2019-10-09)
CRISPR-BEST prevents genome instability
Scientists from The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability has developed CRISPR-BEST, a new genome editing tool for actinomycetes. (2019-10-09)
Engineered viruses could protect soldiers, fight antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is a one of the world's most pressing public health problems. (2019-10-09)
Research brief: Nanoparticles may have bigger impact on the environment than previously thought
In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have shown that nanoparticles may have a bigger impact on the environment than previously thought. (2019-10-09)
Scientists discover new antibiotic in tropical forest
Scientists from Rutgers University and around the world have discovered an antibiotic produced by a soil bacterium from a Mexican tropical forest that may help lead to a 'plant probiotic,' more robust plants and other antibiotics. (2019-10-08)
The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go
EPFL scientists have discovered that predatory bacteria like the cholera pathogen can steal up to 150 genes in one go from their neighbors. (2019-10-07)
Researchers unlock potential to use CRISPR to alter the microbiome
Researchers at Western University have developed a new way to deliver the DNA-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 into microorganisms in the lab, providing a way to efficiently launch a targeted attack on specific bacteria. (2019-10-04)
Weak spot in pathogenic bacteria
Antibiotics are still the most important weapon for combatting bacterial infections. (2019-10-04)
Researchers discover a new defensive mechanism against bacterial wound infections
Wound inflammation which results in impaired wound healing can have serious consequences for patients. (2019-10-04)
Engineered viruses could fight drug resistance
MIT biological engineers can program bacteriophages to kill different strains of E. coli by making mutations in the protein that the viruses use to bind to host cells. (2019-10-03)
FODMAPs diet relieves symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease
New research from King's College London has found that a diet low in fermented carbohydrates has improved certain gut symptoms and improved health-related quality of life for sufferers of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). (2019-10-02)
Horse nutrition: Prebiotics do more harm than good
Prebiotics are only able to help stabilise the intestinal flora of horses to a limited degree. (2019-10-01)
'Poisoned arrowhead' used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
A weapon bacteria use to vanquish their competitors could be copied to create new forms of antibiotics, according to Imperial College London research. (2019-10-01)
Glowing bacteria in anglerfish 'lamp' come from the water
New research shows that female deep-sea anglerfish's bioluminescent bacteria -- which illuminate their 'headlamp' -- most likely come from the water. (2019-10-01)
Protozoans and pathogens make for an infectious mix
The new observation that strains of V. cholerae can be expelled into the environment after being ingested by protozoa, and that these bacteria are then primed for colonisation and infection in humans, could help explain why cholera is so persistent in aquatic environments. (2019-10-01)
The flagellar hook: Making sense of bacterial motility
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) show how bacteria transmit motion from an inner motor to an outer tail through a flexible joint in the flagellum known as the hook. (2019-09-30)
Babies have fewer respiratory infections if they have well-connected bacterial networks
Microscopic bacteria, which are present in all humans, cluster together and form communities in different parts of the body, such as the gut, lungs, nose and mouth. (2019-09-30)
Risk of heart valve infections rising in hospitals
People with heart disease or defective or artificial heart valves are at increased risk of developing a potentially deadly valve infection. (2019-09-29)
Urban beaches are environmental hotspots for antibiotic resistance after rainfall
The results of the study, published in Water Research, provide clear links between storm-water discharge, which sometimes includes wet-weather sewer overflow (WWSO) events, and the presence of AbR in microorganisms living in urban beach habitats. (2019-09-29)
Cause of antibiotic resistance identified
Bacteria can change form in human body, hiding the cell wall inside themselves to avoid detection. (2019-09-26)
How fungus-farming ants could help solve our antibiotic resistance problem
For the last 60 million years, fungus-growing ants have farmed fungi for food. (2019-09-26)
Viruses as modulators of interactions in marine ecosystems
Viruses are mainly known as pathogens - often causing death. (2019-09-26)
Bacteria make pearl chains
For the first time, scientists in Bremen were able to observe bacteria forming pearl chains that protrude from the cell surface. (2019-09-25)
New research reveals soil microbes play a key role in plant disease resistance
Scientists have discovered that soil microbes can make plants more resistant to an aggressive disease -- opening new possibilities for sustainable food production. (2019-09-25)
Microbes are a key marker of vaginal health during menopause
Certain species of bacteria are actually necessary to maintain vaginal health. (2019-09-24)
Evolution experiment: Specific immune response of beetles adapts to bacteria
The memory of the immune system is able to distinguish a foreign protein with which the organism has already come into contact from another and to react with a corresponding antibody. (2019-09-24)
New discoveries map out CRISPR-Cas defence systems in bacteria
For the first time ever, researchers at the University of Copenhagen have mapped how bacterial cells trigger their defense against outside attacks. (2019-09-24)
Symbiosis as a tripartite relationship
While viruses are typically known for their pathogenic properties, new research findings now also demonstrate a positive influence of bacteriophages on the interaction of host organisms with bacteria. (2019-09-24)
Fractal patterns in growing bacterial colonies
Lautaro Vassallo and his co-workers in Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Argentina have modelled the growth and sliding movement of bacterial colonies using a novel method in which the behaviour of each bacterium is simulated separately. (2019-09-20)
Researchers find way to kill pathogen resistant to antibiotics
Nagoya University researchers and colleagues in Japan have demonstrated a new strategy in fighting antibiotics resistance: the use of artificial haem proteins as a Trojan horse to selectively deliver antimicrobials to target bacteria, enabling their specific and effective sterilization. (2019-09-20)
Alcohol-producing gut bacteria could cause liver damage even in people who don't drink
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the build-up of fat in the liver due to factors other than alcohol, but its cause remains unknown. (2019-09-19)
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