Current Barefoot running News and Events

Current Barefoot running News and Events, Barefoot running News Articles.
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Study reveals physical demands of two-hour marathon
Elite runners need a specific combination of physiological abilities to have any chance of running a sub-two-hour marathon, new research shows. (2020-11-13)

Rates of food insecurity remain high despite expansion of NYC food assistance programs
In the latest COVID-19 tracking survey from the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy conducted from September 25 to 27, 34% of the sample of one thousand New York City adults reported that their households had received SNAP benefits since September 1st, 2020. (2020-10-14)

Reasons for football injuries
If professional footballers are out of action due to injuries, this can have serious consequences for the club. However, in order to avoid injuries, it is important to know how exactly and in which situations these injuries typically occur. A research team from the Faculty of Sport Science at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and the German statutory accident insurance VBG (Department for Sports Injury Prevention) has used videos to analyse moderate and severe injuries among professional footballers. (2020-09-24)

Biomechanics: Wearing footwear with toe springs requires less muscle work
Wearing footwear with an upward curvature at the front of the shoe - known as the toe spring - requires less work from the muscles of the feet to walk than shoes with a flatter sole, according to an experimental study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-09-17)

Curve at tip of shoes eases movement but may lead to weaker muscles, problems
The scientists found that the more curved a toe spring is, the less power the foot inside the shoe has to exert when pushing off from the ground while walking. That means foot muscles are doing less work, and this, the researchers hypothesize, may have consequences such as less endurance and make people more susceptible to medical conditions like plantar fasciitis. (2020-09-17)

Exercise improves learning and memory in young adults
Exercise Improves Learning and Memory in Young Adults (2020-09-10)

African wild dogs have vestigial first digit and muscular adaptations for life on the run
African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are known for their unique hunting style, often referred to as ''exhaustive predation'', in which they chase their prey to exhaustion, rather than hunting using speed, strength, or stealth. They are also unique among the dog clade in having only four full digits on their front paws. Until recently, it was unclear how these unique behavioral and anatomical features would affect their forelimb morphology. (2020-09-07)

Thermodynamics of computation: A quest to find the cost of running a Turing machine
Turing machines are widely believed to be universal, in the sense that any computation done by any system can also be done by a Turing machine. In a new paper, researchers present their work exploring the energetic costs of computation within the context of Turing machines. (2020-08-26)

Ecologists put biodiversity experiments to the test
Much of our knowledge of how biodiversity benefits ecosystems comes from experimental sites. These sites contain combinations of species that are not found in the real world, which has led some ecologists to question the findings from biodiversity experiments. But the positive effects of biodiversity are more than an artefact of experimental design and previous findings are, indeed, reliable. This is the result of a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-08-24)

Causes of higher risk of stress fractures in female runners
A pair of new studies identify overlooked physiological factors and lack of knowledge around wellness as contributors to risk of stress fracture in women who run. (2020-08-11)

Small trees offer hope for rainforests
Small trees that grow up in drought conditions could form the basis of more drought-resistant rainforests, new research suggests. (2020-08-04)

Tinkering with roundworm proteins offers hope for anti-aging drugs
KAIST researchers have been able to dial up and down creatures' lifespans by altering the activity of proteins found in roundworm cells that tell them to convert sugar into energy when their cellular energy is running low. Humans also have these proteins, offering up the intriguing possibilities for developing longevity-promoting drugs. These new findings were published on July 1 in Science Advances. (2020-07-31)

What ethical models for autonomous vehicles don't address - and how they could be better
There's a fairly large flaw in the way that programmers are currently addressing ethical concerns related to artificial intelligence and autonomous vehicles (AVs). Namely, existing approaches don't account for the fact that people might try to use AVs to do something bad. (2020-07-06)

Running in Tarahumara culture
Running in Tarahumara (Rarámuri) Culture. The Tarahumara (Rarámuri) are a Native American people from Chihuahua, Mexico, who have long been famous for running, but there is widespread incredulity about how and why they run such long distances. Tarahumara, like many Native American peoples, consider running, along with other endurance-based activities, to have important social dimensions, such as a spiritually vital form of prayer. (Current Anthropology) (2020-07-06)

AI could help improve performance of lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells
Imperial College London researchers have demonstrated how machine learning could help design lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells with better performance. (2020-06-25)

The smallest motor in the world
A research team from Empa and EPFL has developed a molecular motor which consists of only 16 atoms and rotates reliably in one direction. It could allow energy harvesting at the atomic level. The special feature of the motor is that it moves exactly at the boundary between classical motion and quantum tunneling -- and has revealed puzzling phenomena to researchers in the quantum realm. (2020-06-16)

Candidates who use humor on Twitter may find the joke is on them
Political candidates' use of humor on social media could sometimes backfire on them with potential supporters, new research suggests. People were more likely to view messages using humor as inappropriate for a political candidate they didn't know, the study found. That led participants to rate a candidate using humor as less credible than one who didn't -- and less likely to get their vote. (2020-06-15)

Orthotics breakthrough helps children with Cerebral Palsy walk and play
Children with Cerebral Palsy have more energy to play and be physically active for longer thanks to specially designed orthotics. Researchers have confirmed that adapting splints in combination with the footwear used by disabled children to help them walk can decrease the energy they use by as much as 33%. (2020-06-09)

Children's temperament traits affect their motor skills
A recent study among 3- to 7-year-old children showed that children's motor skills benefitted if a child was older and participated in organised sports. Additionally, the study provided information about the importance of temperament traits for motor skills. (2020-05-27)

T. rex was a champion walker, super-efficient at lower speeds
While smaller dinosaurs needed speed, huge predators like T. rex were optimized for energy-efficient walking, according to a study published May 13, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alexander Dececchi of Mount Marty College, South Dakota and colleagues. (2020-05-13)

T. rex's long legs were made for marathon walking
A new study by the University of Maryland's Thomas Holtz and his colleagues suggests that long legs evolved among the biggest dinosaurs to help them conserve energy as they ambled along searching for prey, rather than for speed as previously assumed. (2020-05-13)

To climb like a gecko, robots need toes
Researchers know the secret to geckos' ability to walk on the ceiling: their hairy toes. But how do they use their five toes per foot to adjust to gravity when running horizontally along walls. At UC Berkeley, biologists used high-speed cameras to record how geckos orient their toes with shifting weight, especially when encountering slippery or rough patches, and found a remarkable ability to adjust toe orientation to stick and peel while running full speed. (2020-05-08)

Exercise boosts motor skill learning via changes in brain's transmitters
Comparing the brains of mice that exercised with those that did not, UC San Diego researchers found that specific neurotransmitters switched following sustained exercise, leading to improved learning for motor-skill acquisition. Underscoring the critical benefits of exercise, even in a time of a global pandemic, the researchers found that mice that exercised acquired several demanding motor skills such as staying on a rotating rod or crossing a balance beam more rapidly than a non-exercised group. (2020-05-04)

Foot feathering birds flock genetically together
Lead researcher Chiara Bortoluzzi and colleagues at Wageningen University in the Netherlands, investigated the genetic basis of foot feathering, a phenotype that is observed in certain breeds of chicken. Her new study provides strong evidences that foot feathering has evolved by parallel evolution in chickens and pigeons. (2020-04-28)

How we end up 'confined' on YouTube
Researchers have studied recommendations from a thousand YouTube videos on different subjects, thereby running through half a million recommendations. Their results show that contrary to the algorithms of other platforms, which seem to promote the exploration of novelty and serendipity, YouTube's is actually an exception, generating a number of confinement phenomena. (2020-04-22)

Stanford engineers find ankle exoskeleton aids running
Researchers find that a motorized device that attaches around the ankle and foot can drastically reduce the energy cost of running. (2020-03-25)

Coronavirus massive simulations completed on Frontera supercomputer
Coronavirus envelope all-atom computer model being developed by Amaro Lab of UC San Diego on NSF-funded Frontera supercomputer of TACC at UT Austin. Coronavirus model builds on success of all-atom infuenza virus simulations by Amaro Lab. Molecular dynamics simulations for the coronavirus model tests ran on up to 4,000 nodes, or about 250,000 of Frontera's processing cores. Full model can help researchers design new drugs, vaccines to combat the coronavirus. (2020-03-24)

Why runner's addiction is adding to your injury woes
Each week, millions of runners around the world lace up their running shoes, spurred on by the psychological, health and social benefits that running delivers. But new research from the University of South Australia reveals a downside. (2020-03-04)

Revving habits up and down, new insight into how the brain forms habits
Each day, humans and animals rely on habits to complete routine tasks such as eating. As new habits are formed, this enables us to do things automatically without thinking. As the brain starts to develop a new habit, in as little as a half a second, one region of the brain, the dorsolateral striatum, experiences a short burst in activity, which increases as the habit becomes stronger. A Dartmouth study demonstrates how habits can be controlled depending on how active the dorsolateral striatum is. (2020-02-27)

Cracking the code for hookworm infestation
Monash University researchers have uncovered a key way that hookworms evade the immune system - providing new hope in the search for a vaccine. (2020-02-12)

Fighting climate change at the sink: A guide to greener dishwashing
If you're an environmentally conscious consumer, you've probably heard that today's highly efficient dishwashers use less energy and water than traditional hand-washing techniques. (2020-02-12)

To best treat a burn, first cool with running water, study shows
New research in the January edition of Annals of Emergency Medicine reveals that cooling with running water is the best initial treatment for a child's burn. Researchers found that cool running water can reduce the odds of needing a skin graft, expedite healing and lessen the chance that a young burn victim requires admission to the hospital or an operating procedure. (2020-01-30)

To make amino acids, just add electricity
By finding the right combination of abundantly available starting materials and catalyst, Kyushu University researchers were able to synthesize amino acids with high efficiency through a reaction driven by electricity. Simpler and less resource intensive than current production methods, processes like this may one day be used in resource-restricted conditions to produce the amino acids necessary for living -- even in space or on other planets. (2020-01-29)

Climate costs smallest if warming is limited to 2°C
Using computer simulations of a model by US Nobel Laureate William Nordhaus, they weight climate damages from, for instance, increasing weather extremes or decreasing labor productivity against the costs of cutting greenhouse gas emission by phasing out coal and oil. Interestingly, the economically most cost-efficient level of global warming turns out to be the one more than 190 nations signed as the Paris Climate Agreement. So far however, CO2 reductions promised by nations worldwide are insufficient to reach this goal. (2020-01-27)

Want to turn back time? Try running a marathon
The new year means it's time to set resolutions for 2020 and new research from the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests running a marathon for the first time could have several health benefits. The study found that for first-time marathon runners, training and completion of the marathon was associated with reductions in blood pressure and aortic stiffening in healthy participants that were equivalent to a four-year reduction in vascular age. (2020-01-06)

Unique data confirms why water turns brown
By analysing almost daily water samples taken from the same river from 1940 until today, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have confirmed their hypothesis that the browning of lakes is primarily due to the increase in coniferous forests, as well as rainfall and sulphur deposits. (2019-12-11)

Running research: Heel-toe or toe-heel?
New research from La Trobe University suggests there is no evidence that changing a runner's strike pattern will help prevent injuries or give them a speed boost. (2019-12-11)

Getting to the 'art' of dementia: UC researchers highlight benefits of art intervention
University of Canberra researchers have shown that art gallery programs can improve the wellbeing of people living with dementia -- and they've backed it up by testing study participants' saliva. (2019-12-04)

Simple model explains why different four-legged animals adopt similar gaits
Most mammals walk at slow speeds and run or trot at intermediate speeds because these movement strategies are energetically optimal, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology by Delyle Polet and John Bertram of the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada. (2019-11-21)

New lightweight, portable robotic suit to increase running and walking performance
A new study presenting a revolutionary robotic mobility-assistance suit was published in the journal Science this August. This study showcases a portable 'exosuit' that can assist users during walking and running, providing significant energy savings in terms of metabolic activity. This robotic suit has important applications for people with a wide range of restricted mobility, particularly those with limited knee function and above-knee amputees. (2019-10-21)

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