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Current Bats News and Events, Bats News Articles.
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Generational shifts help migratory bats keep pace with global warming
An international team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research demonstrated that in the common noctule bat, one of the largest European bat species, the colonization of hibernacula progresses from lower to higher latitudes over successive generations of young animals - especially first-year males. (2020-09-23)
Study shows SARS-CoV-2 jumped between people and mink, providing strong evidence of zoonotic transmission
A study investigating SARS-CoV-2 infections across 16 mink farms in the Netherlands, being presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that the virus likely jumped between people and mink and back, providing strong evidence that animal to human (zoonotic) transmission is possible. (2020-09-17)
Animals' magnetic 'sixth' sense may come from bacteria, new paper suggests
A University of Central Florida researcher is co-author of a new paper that may help answer why some animals have a magnetic ''sixth'' sense, such as sea turtles' ability to return to the beach where they were born. (2020-09-14)
How chemical diversity in plants facilitates plant-animal interactions
As we continue to lose global biodiversity, we are also losing chemical diversity and the chance for discovery,''said Lauren Maynard, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Biological Sciences within the College of Science. (2020-09-10)
Bat tick found for the first time in New Jersey
A tick species associated with bats has been reported for the first time in New Jersey and could pose health risks to people, pets and livestock, according to a Rutgers-led study in the Journal of Medical Entomology. (2020-09-09)
Distribution range of Ebola virus carriers in Africa may be larger than previously assumed
Zaire ebolavirus is among the deadliest of all known Ebola viruses for humans and is most likely transmitted by various species of bats. (2020-09-07)
What did the katydids do when picking up bat sounds?
Ecosystems can be incredibly complex, with many interacting species. In many habitats, predators shape they behavior of prey and prey shape the behavior of predators. (2020-08-28)
Penis bones, echolocation calls, and genes reveal new kinds of bats
Vesper bats are the biggest family of bats in the world, and they all kind of look alike, making it hard to tell different species apart. (2020-08-27)
Researchers to investigate wind power effects on bats in the Baltic Sea region
Despite the increasing numbers of wind turbines, their impacts on the environment are poorly known. (2020-08-24)
Genomic analysis reveals many animal species may be vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection
Analysis of ACE2, the main receptor that SARS-CoV-2 uses to bind and enter cells, across 410 vertebrate species reveals that many are potentially susceptible to infection by the novel coronavirus. (2020-08-21)
Why doesn't Ebola cause disease in bats, as it does in people?
A new study by researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston uncovered new information on why the Ebola virus can live within bats without causing them harm, while the same virus wreaks deadly havoc to people. (2020-08-18)
Mother bats use baby talk to communicate with their pups
When addressing infants, human adults tend to change the speed, pitch and ''color'' of their voice. (2020-08-18)
Coronavirus transmission risk increases along wildlife supply chains
Coronaviruses were detected in a high proportion of bats and rodents in Viet Nam from 2013 to 2014, with an increasing proportion of positive samples found along the wildlife supply chain from traders to large markets to restaurants, according to a study published August 10, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Amanda Fine of the Wildlife Conservation Society and colleagues. (2020-08-10)
Researchers identify evolutionary origins of SARS-CoV-2
By reconstructing the evolutionary history of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, an international research team of Chinese, European and U.S. scientists has discovered that the lineage that gave rise to the virus has been circulating in bats for decades and likely includes other viruses with the ability to infect humans. (2020-07-28)
The genetic basis of bats' superpowers revealed
First six reference-quality bat genomes released and analysed (2020-07-23)
Genomic basis of bat superpowers revealed: Like how they survive deadly viruses
The genetic material that codes for bat adaptations and superpowers - such as the ability to fly, to use sound to move effortlessly in complete darkness, to tolerate and survive potentially deadly viruses, and to resist aging and cancer - has been revealed and published in Nature. (2020-07-22)
AJTMH July updates
Below is an update of COVID-19 articles published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (AJTMH). (2020-07-22)
MRI scans of the brains of 130 mammals, including humans, indicate equal connectivity
Researchers at Tel Aviv University conducted a first-of-its-kind study designed to investigate brain connectivity in 130 mammalian species. (2020-07-20)
Researchers cast doubt on earlier COVID-19 origins study citing dogs as possible hosts
A study published earlier this year claiming the coronavirus may have jumped from dogs to humans is scientifically flawed, offering no direct evidence to support its conclusions, according to a collaborative group of international researchers, including scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-07-14)
Bat research critical to preventing next pandemic
The current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has a likely connection to bats, and the next viral outbreak probably will too. (2020-07-13)
When calling loudly, echolocation is costly for small bats
Calling in the ultrasonic range enables small bats to orient themselves in the dark and track down insects. (2020-07-13)
Structural analysis of COVID-19 spike protein provides insight into its evolution
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have characterised the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as well as its most similar relative in a bat coronavirus. (2020-07-09)
Trust me if you can
Each year, wind turbines are responsible for the death of hundreds of thousands of airborne animals such as bats. (2020-07-09)
Bats offer clues to treating COVID-19
Bats carry many viruses, including COVID-19, without becoming ill. Biologists at the University of Rochester are studying the immune system of bats to find potential ways to ''mimic'' that system in humans. (2020-07-09)
Movement ecology bears fruits: ATLAS supports map-based navigation of wild bats
Hebrew University and Tel Aviv University researchers collaborated on tracking wild bats' foraging habits in their natural habitat. (2020-07-09)
Why it's no last orders for the Tequila bat
Scientists studying the 'near threatened' tequila bat, best known for its role in pollinating the Blue Agave plant from which the drink of the same name is made from, have analysed its DNA to help inform conservationists on managing their populations. (2020-07-06)
COVID-19 from food safety and biosecurity perspective
Most recently emerged pneumonia of unknown cause named COVID-19 has a devastating impact on public health and economy surpassing its counterparts in morbidity and mortality. (2020-06-24)
A new social role for echolocation in bats that hunt together
To find prey in the dark, bats use echolocation. Some species, like Molossus molossus, may also search within hearing distance of their echolocating group members, sharing information about where food patches are located. (2020-06-19)
Wind farms on the Black Sea coast could endanger bat populations in Eastern Europe
The Via Pontica, an important migration route for birds in Eastern Europe, runs along the Black Sea coast of Romania and Bulgaria. (2020-06-17)
Ebola transmission risks would be taken more seriously with ground-up interventions
A study led by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found significant differences in disease risk perception and channels of information about Ebola virus disease (EVD) in rural areas and urban centres of Guinea, West Africa. (2020-06-10)
Restoring vision by gene therapy
Latest scientific findings give hope for people with incurable retinal degeneration. (2020-06-04)
How do land-use changes affect the spread of diseases between animals and people?
Most new viruses and other pathogens that arise in humans are transmitted from other animals, as in the case of the virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-06-03)
'Major gaps' in understanding how land-use changes affect spread of diseases
The quest to discover how new diseases -- such as Covid-19 -- emerge and spread in response to global land-use change driven by human population expansion still contains 'major gaps', researchers have claimed. (2020-06-03)
SARS-CoV-2 possibly emerged from shuffling and selection of viral genes across different species
A combination of genetic shuffling and evolutionary selection of near-identical genetic sequences among specific bat and pangolin coronaviruses may have led to the evolution of SARS-CoV-2. (2020-05-29)
Evolution of pandemic coronavirus outlines path from animals to humans
A team of scientists studying the origin of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that has caused the COVID-19 pandemic, found that it was especially well-suited to jump from animals to humans by shapeshifting as it gained the ability to infect human cells. (2020-05-29)
MetaviralSPAdes -- New assembler for virus genomes
There was no specialized viral metagenome assembler until recently. But the joint team of Russian and US researchers from Saint-Petersburg State University and University of California at San Diego just released the metaviralSPAdes assembler (published in journal Bioinformatics on May 16) that turns the analysis of the metavirome sequencing results into an easy task. (2020-05-25)
Eavesdropping crickets drop from the sky to evade capture by bats
Researchers have uncovered the highly efficient strategy used by a group of crickets to distinguish the calls of predatory bats from the incessant noises of the nocturnal jungle. (2020-05-17)
A close relative of SARS-CoV-2 found in bats offers more evidence it evolved naturally
On May 10 in the journal Current Biology, researchers describe a recently identified bat coronavirus that contains insertions of amino acids at the junction of the S1 and S2 subunits of the virus's spike protein in a manner similar to SAR-CoV-2. (2020-05-11)
Bat 'super immunity' may explain how bats carry coronaviruses -- USask study
A University of Saskatchewan (USask) research team has uncovered how bats can carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus without getting sick -- research that could shed light on how coronaviruses make the jump to humans and other animals. (2020-05-06)
Risky business: Courtship movements put katydids in danger
Males signalling their attractiveness to females are at risk from predators that exploit mating signals to detect and locate prey. (2020-04-30)
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