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How do land-use changes affect the spread of diseases between animals and people?
Most new viruses and other pathogens that arise in humans are transmitted from other animals, as in the case of the virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-06-03)
'Major gaps' in understanding how land-use changes affect spread of diseases
The quest to discover how new diseases -- such as Covid-19 -- emerge and spread in response to global land-use change driven by human population expansion still contains 'major gaps', researchers have claimed. (2020-06-03)
SARS-CoV-2 possibly emerged from shuffling and selection of viral genes across different species
A combination of genetic shuffling and evolutionary selection of near-identical genetic sequences among specific bat and pangolin coronaviruses may have led to the evolution of SARS-CoV-2. (2020-05-29)
Evolution of pandemic coronavirus outlines path from animals to humans
A team of scientists studying the origin of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that has caused the COVID-19 pandemic, found that it was especially well-suited to jump from animals to humans by shapeshifting as it gained the ability to infect human cells. (2020-05-29)
MetaviralSPAdes -- New assembler for virus genomes
There was no specialized viral metagenome assembler until recently. But the joint team of Russian and US researchers from Saint-Petersburg State University and University of California at San Diego just released the metaviralSPAdes assembler (published in journal Bioinformatics on May 16) that turns the analysis of the metavirome sequencing results into an easy task. (2020-05-25)
Eavesdropping crickets drop from the sky to evade capture by bats
Researchers have uncovered the highly efficient strategy used by a group of crickets to distinguish the calls of predatory bats from the incessant noises of the nocturnal jungle. (2020-05-17)
A close relative of SARS-CoV-2 found in bats offers more evidence it evolved naturally
On May 10 in the journal Current Biology, researchers describe a recently identified bat coronavirus that contains insertions of amino acids at the junction of the S1 and S2 subunits of the virus's spike protein in a manner similar to SAR-CoV-2. (2020-05-11)
Bat 'super immunity' may explain how bats carry coronaviruses -- USask study
A University of Saskatchewan (USask) research team has uncovered how bats can carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus without getting sick -- research that could shed light on how coronaviruses make the jump to humans and other animals. (2020-05-06)
Risky business: Courtship movements put katydids in danger
Males signalling their attractiveness to females are at risk from predators that exploit mating signals to detect and locate prey. (2020-04-30)
Are salt deposits a solution for nuclear waste disposal?
Researchers testing and modeling to dispose of the current supply of waste. (2020-04-29)
Coronaviruses and bats have been evolving together for millions of years
Scientists compared the different kinds of coronaviruses living in 36 bat species from the western Indian Ocean and nearby areas of Africa. (2020-04-23)
New bat species discovered -- cousins of the ones suspected in COVID-19
Researchers just discovered at least four new species of African leaf-nosed bats -- cousins of the horseshoe bats that served as hosts of the virus behind COVID-19. (2020-04-22)
Novel research on African bats pilots new ways in sharing and linking published data
New findings about some previously known, but also other yet to be identified species of Old World Leaf-nosed bats provide the first contribution to a special research collection, whose task is to help scientists from across disciplines to better understand potential hosts and vectors of diseases like the Coronavirus. (2020-04-22)
COVID-19: Genetic network analysis provides 'snapshot' of pandemic origins
First use of phylogenetic techniques shows 'ancestral' virus genome closest to those in bats was not Wuhan's predominant virus type. (2020-04-08)
The ocean responds to a warming planet
The oceans help buffer the Earth from climate change by absorbing carbon dioxide and heat at the surface and transporting it to the deep ocean. (2020-04-06)
A next-generation sensor network for tracking small animals
A newly developed wireless biologging network (WBN) enables high-resolution tracking of small animals, according to a study published April 2 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Simon Ripperger of the Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, and colleagues. (2020-04-02)
Scientists develop 'backpack' computers to track wild animals in hard-to-reach habitats
To truly understand an animal species is to observe its behavior and social networks in the wild. (2020-04-02)
A possible treatment for COVID-19 and an approach for developing others
SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 disease is more transmissible, but has a lower mortality rate than its sibling, SARS-CoV, according to a review article published this week in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-03-26)
Missing link in coronavirus jump from bats to humans could be pangolins, not snakes
As scientists scramble to learn more about the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, two recent studies of the virus' genome reached controversial conclusions: namely, that snakes are intermediate hosts of the new virus, and that a key coronavirus protein shares 'uncanny similarities' with an HIV-1 protein. (2020-03-26)
Bats depend on conspecifics when hunting above farmland
Common noctules -- one of the largest bat species native to Germany -- are searching for their fellows during their hunt for insects above farmland. (2020-03-25)
Among wild mammals too, females live longer
In all human populations, average lifespans are longer for women than for men. (2020-03-23)
How the brain controls the voice
A particular neuronal circuit in the brains of bats controls their vocalisations. (2020-03-20)
Vampire bats form deep social bonds by grooming before sharing blood
For vampire bats, sharing blood with a roostmate is the mark of a true bond. (2020-03-19)
Scientists learn how vampire bat strangers make friends
Scientists haven't had a good grip on how friendly connections among strangers are made between animals -- until now. (2020-03-19)
The COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic has a natural origin, scientists say
Scripps Research's analysis of public genome sequence data from SARS-CoV-2 and related viruses found no evidence that the virus was made in a laboratory or otherwise engineered. (2020-03-17)
One of Darwin's evolution theories finally proved by Cambridge researcher
Scientists have proved one of Charles Darwin's theories of evolution for the first time -- nearly 140 years after his death. (2020-03-17)
Predicting the impacts of white-nose syndrome in bats
Researchers have found that the pathogen levels in the environment play a major role in whether bat populations are stable or experience severe declines from white-nose syndrome. (2020-03-16)
Newly confirmed biochemical mechanism in cells is key component of the anti-ageing program
Scientists from Russia, Germany and Switzerland now confirmed a mechanism in mouse, bat and naked mole rat cells -- a 'mild depolarization' of the inner mitochondrial membrane -- that is linked to ageing: Mild depolarization regulates the creation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) in cells and is therefore a mechanism of the anti-ageing program. (2020-03-11)
Illness won't stop vampire bat moms from caring for their offspring
A study of social interactions among vampire bats that felt sick suggests family comes first when illness strikes - and may help explain which social interactions are most likely to contribute to disease transmission. (2020-03-05)
Even fake illness affects relationships among vampire bats
How do social interactions change in the face of illness? (2020-03-04)
Deaf moths evolved noise-cancelling scales to evade prey
Some species of deaf moths can absorb as much as 85 per cent of the incoming sound energy from predatory bats -- who use echolocation to detect them. (2020-02-25)
First genetic evidence of resistance in some bats to white-nose syndrome, a devastating fungal disease
A new study from University of Michigan biologists presents the first genetic evidence of resistance in some bats to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungal disease that has decimated some North American bat populations. (2020-02-20)
The (un)usual suspect -- novel coronavirus identified
The 2019 novel coronavirus (CoV) causes fatal pneumonia that has claimed over 1300 lives, with more than 52000 confirmed cases of infection by February 13, 2020, all in the span of just over a month. (2020-02-17)
How gliding animals fine-tuned the rules of evolution
Since its inception in 1867, The American Naturalist has maintained its position as one of the world's premier peer-reviewed publications in ecology, evolution, and behavior research. (2020-02-17)
For evolutionary study finds rare bats in decline, CCNY research
A study led by Susan Tsang, a former Fulbright Research Fellow from The City College of New York, reveals dwindling populations and widespread hunting throughout Indonesia and the Philippines of the world's largest bats, known as flying foxes. (2020-02-14)
Coronavirus outbreak raises question: Why are bat viruses so deadly?
A UC Berkeley study of cultured bat cells shows that their strong immune responses, constantly primed to respond to viruses, can drive viruses to greater virulence. (2020-02-10)
Bats inspire detectors to help prevent oil and gas pipe leaks
Engineers have developed a new scanning technique inspired by the natural world that can detect corroding metals in oil and gas pipelines. (2020-01-30)
Near caves and mines, corrugated pipes may interfere with bat echolocation
Corrugated metal pipes have been installed at cave and mine entrances to help bats access their roosts, but a new study from Brown University researchers suggests that these pipes may actually deter bats. (2020-01-30)
Blind as a bat? The genetic basis of echolocation in bats and whales
Scientists reveal that similar genetic mutations led to the establishment of echolocation in both bats and whales. (2020-01-29)
Watching bat coronaviruses with next-generation sequencing
This week in mSphere, an international group of researchers describe how to use enrichment -- one such emerging NGS strategy -- for monitoring coronaviruses, especially those that originate in bats. (2020-01-29)
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