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Current Bees News and Events

Current Bees News and Events, Bees News Articles.
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Yeasts in nectar can stimulate the growth of bee colonies
Researchers from KU Leuven have found that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees. (2019-11-20)
Ohio University entomologist: Photos show evidence of life on Mars
As scientists scramble to determine whether there is life on Mars, Ohio University Professor Emeritus William Romoser's research shows that we already have the evidence. (2019-11-19)
Bees 'surf' atop water
Ever see a bee stuck in a pool? He's surfing to escape. (2019-11-18)
Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways
Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals -- many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada -- are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-11-07)
SDHI pesticides are toxic for human cells
French scientists led by a CNRS researcher have just revealed that eight succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor pesticide molecules do not just inhibit the SDH activity of fungi, but can also block that of earthworms, bees, and human cells in varying proportions. (2019-11-07)
Using probiotics to protect honey bees against fatal disease
A group of researchers at Western and Lawson combined their expertise in probiotics and bee biology to supplement honey bee food with probiotics, in the form a BioPatty, in their experimental apiaries. (2019-10-30)
Strategies of a honey bee virus
Heidelberg, 23 October 2019 - The Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus is a pathogen that affects honey bees and has been linked to Colony Collapse Disorder, a key factor in decimating the bee population. (2019-10-23)
Stingless bee species depend on a complex fungal community to survive
A report published in PLOS ONE describes key roles of various microorganisms in the development of the larvae of Scaptotrigona depilis. (2019-10-22)
New study reveals that crabs can solve and remember their way around a maze
A new Swansea University study has revealed how common shore crabs can navigate their way around a complex maze and can even remember the route in order to find food. (2019-10-22)
MSU economist's research on colony collapse disorder published in national journal
Randy Rucker and two colleagues are the authors of a paper published last month that examines the economic impacts of colony collapse disorder. (2019-10-04)
Confronting colony collapse
Researchers from the Ecology and Evolution Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) sequenced the genomes of the two Varroa mite species that parasitize the honey bee. (2019-10-03)
Bumble bee workers sleep less while caring for young
All animals, including insects, need their sleep. Or do they? (2019-10-03)
New parents? Tired of nighttime feedings? Bees can relate
Bumble bees tasked with caring for larvae and pupae sleep less than colony members who do not care for the young. (2019-10-03)
Burt's Bees presents clinical data demonstrating proven efficacy of natural skin care
At this year's Integrative Dermatology Symposium, Burt's Bees, a pioneer in natural skin care, will be presenting research supporting the role of efficacy-first natural regimens for skin health. (2019-10-03)
New tool improves beekeepers' overwintering odds and bottom line
A new tool from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) can predict the odds that honey bee colonies overwintered in cold storage will be large enough to rent for almond pollination in February. (2019-09-18)
Scientists set to start $10M project to create health diagnosis tool for bees
With Canada's honey bees dying, beekeepers and government regulators have been left struggling to find ways to quickly diagnose, manage and improve bee health. (2019-09-18)
Controversial insecticides shown to threaten survival of wild birds
New University of Saskatchewan research shows how the world's most widely used insecticides could be partly responsible for dramatic declines in farmland bird populations. (2019-09-12)
It's all a blur.....why stripes hide moving prey
Scientists at Newcastle University have shown that patterns -- particularly stripes which are easy to spot when an animal is still -- can also help conceal speeding prey. (2019-09-11)
Buzzkill?
They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight. (2019-09-10)
Swapping pollinators reduces species diversity, study finds
In a new paper published in Evolution Letters, Carolyn Wessinger and Lena Hileman demonstrate that abandoning one pollinator for another to realize immediate benefits could compromise a flower's long-term survival. (2019-09-10)
Researchers determine pollen abundance and diversity in pollinator-dependent crops
A new study provides valuable insights into pollen abundance and diversity available to honeybee colonies employed in five major pollinator-dependent crops in Oregon and California. (2019-08-30)
How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. (2019-08-27)
Wild ground-nesting bees might be exposed to lethal levels of neonics in soil
In a first-ever study investigating the risk of neonicotinoid insecticides to ground-nesting bees, University of Guelph researchers have discovered hoary squash bees are being exposed to lethal levels of the chemicals in the soil. (2019-08-26)
Honeybee brain development may enhance waggle dance communication
Changes in a vibration-sensitive neuron may equip forager honeybees for waggle dance communication, according to research recently published in eNeuro. (2019-08-26)
Scientists use honey and wild salmon to trace industrial metals in the environment
Scientists have combined analyses from honey and salmon to show how lead from natural and industrial sources gets distributed throughout the environment. (2019-08-21)
Queen bees face increased chance of execution if they mate with two males rather than one
Queen stingless bees face an increased risk of being executed by worker bees if they mate with two males rather than one, according to new research by the University of Sussex and the University of São Paulo. (2019-08-20)
Where are the bees? Tracking down which flowers they pollinate
Earlham Institute (EI), with the University of East Anglia (UEA), have developed a new method to rapidly identify the sources of bee pollen to understand which flowers are important for bees. (2019-08-08)
Road verges provide refuge for pollinators
Roadside verges provide a vital refuge for pollinators -- but they must be managed better, new research shows. (2019-08-05)
Pesticides deliver a one-two punch to honey bees
A new paper in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry reveals that adjuvants, chemicals commonly added to pesticides, amplify toxicity affecting mortality rates, flight intensity, colony intensity, and pupae development in honey bees. (2019-08-05)
How climate change disrupts relationships
Plants rely on bees for pollination; bees need plants to supply nectar and pollen. (2019-07-24)
'Intensive' beekeeping not to blame for common bee diseases
More 'intensive' beekeeping does not raise the risk of diseases that harm or kill the insects, new research suggests. (2019-07-17)
Plant probe could help estimate bee exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides
Bee populations are declining, and neonicotinoid pesticides continue to be investigated -- and in some cases banned -- because of their suspected role as a contributing factor. (2019-07-17)
Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators
Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production. (2019-07-12)
Study: Global farming trends threaten food security
Citrus fruits, coffee and avocados: the food on our tables has become more diverse in recent decades. (2019-07-11)
Insects need empathy
In February, environmentalists in Germany collected 1.75 million signatures for a 'save the bees law.' Citizens can stop insect declines by halting habitat loss and fragmentation, producing food without pesticides and limiting climate change, say the authors of this Perspectives piece in Science. (2019-06-27)
Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance
A team of researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the University of La Rochelle is now the first to have demonstrated that organic farming benefits honeybee colonies, especially when food is scarce in late spring. (2019-06-26)
Managed apiaries may lead to higher rates of viral infection in wild bumblebees
Viral pathogens that might play a role in the decline in wild bumblebees may be transmitted from managed honeybees through flowers, according to a study published June 26 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Samantha Alger of the University of Vermont, and colleagues. (2019-06-26)
Honeybees infect wild bumblebees -- through shared flowers
Viruses in managed honeybees are spilling over to wild bumblebee populations though the shared use of flowers, a first-of-its-kind study reveals. (2019-06-26)
US beekeepers lost over 40% of colonies last year, highest winter losses ever recorded
Beekeepers across the United States lost 40.7% of their honey bee colonies from April 2018 to April 2019, according to preliminary results of the latest annual nationwide survey conducted by the University of Maryland-led nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership. (2019-06-19)
Bees required to create an excellent blueberry crop
Getting an excellent rabbiteye blueberry harvest requires helpful pollinators -- particularly native southeastern blueberry bees -- although growers can bring in managed honey bees to do the job, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. (2019-06-17)
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