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Current Behavior News and Events

Current Behavior News and Events, Behavior News Articles.
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Team finds how error and reward signals are organized within the cerebral cortex
With the team having verified generators of the error signal, further research is needed to determine what each generator contributes. (2019-01-14)
Childhood stress of mice affects their offspring behavior
Russian neuroscientists discovered that the stress experienced by mice during their first weeks of life, affects not only them but also their offspring. (2019-01-08)
Do large human crowds exhibit a collective behavior?
By observing the collective movement of thousands of Chicago Marathon runners queueing up to the starting line, researchers find that the motion of large crowds is fluid-like and mathematically predictable. (2019-01-03)
Kicking, yelling during sleep? Study finds risk factors for violent sleep disorder
Taking antidepressants for depression, having post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety diagnosed by a doctor are risk factors for a disruptive and sometimes violent sleep disorder called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, according to a study published in the Dec. (2018-12-26)
Regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism by galanin-like peptide (GALP)
Galanin-like peptide (GALP) is composed of 60 amino acid residues and its sequence is highly homologous across species. (2018-12-24)
Swarming behavior discovered in fish-dwelling parasite
Johns Hopkins researchers have observed a previously unrecognized behavior in a single-celled parasite called Spironucleus vortens, which infects ornamental fish such as angelfish: The protozoans swarm. (2018-12-13)
Why feeling empathy could lead former drug users to relapse
Empathy, the awareness of another's feelings and emotions, is a key feature in normal social interactions. (2018-12-10)
Study finds bad bosses could turn you into a great boss
A new University of Central Florida study suggests abuse and mistreatment by those at the top of an organization do not necessarily lead to abusive behavior by lower-level leaders. (2018-12-03)
Microbial-based treatment reverses autism spectrum social deficits in mouse models
An unconventional approach has successfully reversed deficits in social behaviors associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in genetic, environmental and idiopathic mouse models of the condition. (2018-12-03)
When working ants take a sick day, the whole colony benefits
Scientists have shown that the social insect Lasius niger (or black garden ant) changes its behavior following exposure to a fungus, a strategy that protects the most vulnerable and important members of the colony from infection. (2018-11-22)
Human pharmaceuticals change cricket personality
Crickets that are exposed to human drugs that alter serotonin levels in the brain are less active and less aggressive than crickets that have had no drug exposure, according to a new study led by researchers from Linköping University. (2018-11-16)
What did birds and insects do during the 2017 solar eclipse?
In August of 2017, millions peered through protective eyewear at the solar eclipse -- the first total eclipse visible in the continental United States in nearly 40 years. (2018-11-15)
Adults report distress associated with difficulty controlling sexual feelings, behavior
About 10 percent of men and 7 percent of women reported significant levels of distress and social impairment associated with difficulty controlling their sexual feelings, urges and behaviors. (2018-11-09)
Do neonicotinoids inhibit the development of anti-predatory behaviors in wood frogs?
Wood frogs are a bit more sluggish when exposed to neonicotinoids. (2018-10-25)
Army scientists develop computational model to predict human behavior
Army researchers have developed for the first time an analytic model to show how groups of people influence individual behavior. (2018-10-24)
Prize-winning research reveals how parenting behavior is controlled in the mouse brain
Johannes Kohl has been named the 2018 Grand Prize winner of The Eppendorf & Science Prize for Neurobiology, for research that makes sense of how a cluster of neurons controls parenting behavior in mice. (2018-10-11)
Optical illusion spooks raptors
Researchers from the CNRS and Université de Rennes 1, in collaboration with Airbus, have designed a visual pattern that elicits long-term avoidance of high-risk areas by raptors. (2018-10-11)
Sensitive babies become altruistic toddlers
Our responsiveness to seeing others in distress accounts for variability in helping behavior from early in development, according to a study published Sept. (2018-09-25)
Outside competition breeds more trust among coworkers: Study
Working in a competitive industry fosters a greater level of trust amongst workers, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia, Princeton University and Aix-Marseille University, published today in Science: Advances. (2018-09-19)
Stress over fussy eating prompts parents to pressure or reward at mealtime
Although fussy eating is developmentally normal and transient phase for most children, the behavior can be stressful for parents. (2018-09-17)
Reward of labor in wild chimpanzees
Wild chimpanzees of the Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, hunt in groups to catch monkeys. (2018-09-10)
Person-centered video blogs increase chances of viewer support for cancer patients
As people with cancer use social media to find and develop support systems, a new study looks at YouTube content to determine what kinds of videos elicit an empathetic response from viewers. (2018-09-04)
Fruit flies and electrons: Researchers use physics to predict crowd behavior
Electrons whizzing around each other and humans crammed together at a political rally don't seem to have much in common, but researchers at Cornell University are connecting the dots. (2018-08-30)
Amber unveils evolution of ancient antlions
An international team led by Professor WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology and two Italian researchers found fossil Myrmeleontiformia fauna from mid-Cretaceous (approximately 100 million years ago) Burmese amber. (2018-08-22)
New paper addresses human/wildlife conflict through use of social and ecological theory
In a new paper in the journal Biological Conservation, the researchers apply a new approach to understand human-black bear conflicts in Durango, Colorado. (2018-08-22)
Students' social skills flourish best in groups with similar skill levels
Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that children who need assistance improving their social skills might benefit more when grouped with peers who have similar social skill levels, rather than with peers who have a similar disability or disorder. (2018-08-15)
Immune cells in the brain have surprising influence on sexual behavior
Immune cells usually ignored by neuroscientists appear to play an important role in determining whether an animal's sexual behavior will be more typical of a male or female. (2018-08-14)
Wearable devices and mobile health technology: one step towards better health
With increasing efforts being made to address the current global obesity epidemic, wearable devices and mobile health ('mHealth') technology have emerged as promising tools for promoting physical activity. (2018-08-13)
Flies meet gruesome end under influence of puppeteer fungus
Various fungi are known to infect insects and alter their behavior, presumably to assist in spreading fungal spores as widely as possible. (2018-07-31)
One gene to rule them all: Regulating eusociality in ants
A single gene associated with insulin signaling likely drove the evolutionary rise of an ant queen's reproductive royalty, researchers suggest. (2018-07-26)
New study: Omega-3s help keep kids out of trouble
Something as simple as a dietary supplement could reduce disruptive, even abusive behavior, according to newly released research by a team led by a UMass Lowell criminal justice professor who specializes in the intersection of biology and behavior. (2018-07-24)
Are you prone to feeling guilty? Then you're probably more trustworthy, study shows
New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds that when it comes to predicting who is most likely to act in a trustworthy manner, one of the most important factors is the anticipation of guilt. (2018-07-19)
Black children subjected to higher discipline rates than peers
Elementary school discipline policies that rely on expulsions or suspensions as punishment may be fostering childhood inequality, a new study shows. (2018-07-17)
Voters do not always walk the talk when it comes to infidelity
Democrats, who generally have a more liberal take on sexual matters, were least likely to use an adultery dating service, while members of the conservative Libertarian party had the greatest tendency to do so. (2018-07-12)
Hungry? A newly discovered neural circuit may be the cause
A particular subset of neurons located in an enigmatic region of the hypothalamus plays a central role in regulating feeding and body weight in mice, a new study reveals. (2018-07-05)
Prospective teachers more likely to view black faces than white faces as angry
A preliminary study of prospective teachers finds that they are more likely to view the face of black adults as angry compared to the faces of white adults. (2018-07-02)
Bad behavior to significant other in tough times has more impact than positive gestures
Refraining from bad behavior toward a significant other during stressful life events is more important than showing positive behavior, according to a Baylor University study. (2018-06-26)
Food insecurity has greater impact on disadvantaged children
In 2016, 12.9 million children lived in food-insecure households. These children represent a vulnerable population since their developing brains can suffer long-term negative consequences from undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. (2018-06-26)
You don't need to believe in free will to be a nice person, shows new research
Social psychologist Damien Crone (University of Melbourne) and Philosophy professor Neil Levy (Macquarie University and the University of Oxford) conducted a series of studies of 921 of people and found that a person's moral behavior is not tied to their beliefs in free will. (2018-06-25)
Humans are causing mammals to increasingly adopt the nightlife
Human activity is driving many mammals worldwide to be more active at night, when they are less likely to encounter humans, a new study reveals. (2018-06-14)
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