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Current Behavior News and Events, Behavior News Articles.
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Outside competition breeds more trust among coworkers: Study
Working in a competitive industry fosters a greater level of trust amongst workers, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia, Princeton University and Aix-Marseille University, published today in Science: Advances. (2018-09-19)
Stress over fussy eating prompts parents to pressure or reward at mealtime
Although fussy eating is developmentally normal and transient phase for most children, the behavior can be stressful for parents. (2018-09-17)
Reward of labor in wild chimpanzees
Wild chimpanzees of the Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, hunt in groups to catch monkeys. (2018-09-10)
Person-centered video blogs increase chances of viewer support for cancer patients
As people with cancer use social media to find and develop support systems, a new study looks at YouTube content to determine what kinds of videos elicit an empathetic response from viewers. (2018-09-04)
Fruit flies and electrons: Researchers use physics to predict crowd behavior
Electrons whizzing around each other and humans crammed together at a political rally don't seem to have much in common, but researchers at Cornell University are connecting the dots. (2018-08-30)
Amber unveils evolution of ancient antlions
An international team led by Professor WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology and two Italian researchers found fossil Myrmeleontiformia fauna from mid-Cretaceous (approximately 100 million years ago) Burmese amber. (2018-08-22)
New paper addresses human/wildlife conflict through use of social and ecological theory
In a new paper in the journal Biological Conservation, the researchers apply a new approach to understand human-black bear conflicts in Durango, Colorado. (2018-08-22)
Students' social skills flourish best in groups with similar skill levels
Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that children who need assistance improving their social skills might benefit more when grouped with peers who have similar social skill levels, rather than with peers who have a similar disability or disorder. (2018-08-15)
Immune cells in the brain have surprising influence on sexual behavior
Immune cells usually ignored by neuroscientists appear to play an important role in determining whether an animal's sexual behavior will be more typical of a male or female. (2018-08-14)
Wearable devices and mobile health technology: one step towards better health
With increasing efforts being made to address the current global obesity epidemic, wearable devices and mobile health ('mHealth') technology have emerged as promising tools for promoting physical activity. (2018-08-13)
Flies meet gruesome end under influence of puppeteer fungus
Various fungi are known to infect insects and alter their behavior, presumably to assist in spreading fungal spores as widely as possible. (2018-07-31)
One gene to rule them all: Regulating eusociality in ants
A single gene associated with insulin signaling likely drove the evolutionary rise of an ant queen's reproductive royalty, researchers suggest. (2018-07-26)
New study: Omega-3s help keep kids out of trouble
Something as simple as a dietary supplement could reduce disruptive, even abusive behavior, according to newly released research by a team led by a UMass Lowell criminal justice professor who specializes in the intersection of biology and behavior. (2018-07-24)
Are you prone to feeling guilty? Then you're probably more trustworthy, study shows
New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds that when it comes to predicting who is most likely to act in a trustworthy manner, one of the most important factors is the anticipation of guilt. (2018-07-19)
Black children subjected to higher discipline rates than peers
Elementary school discipline policies that rely on expulsions or suspensions as punishment may be fostering childhood inequality, a new study shows. (2018-07-17)
Voters do not always walk the talk when it comes to infidelity
Democrats, who generally have a more liberal take on sexual matters, were least likely to use an adultery dating service, while members of the conservative Libertarian party had the greatest tendency to do so. (2018-07-12)
Hungry? A newly discovered neural circuit may be the cause
A particular subset of neurons located in an enigmatic region of the hypothalamus plays a central role in regulating feeding and body weight in mice, a new study reveals. (2018-07-05)
Prospective teachers more likely to view black faces than white faces as angry
A preliminary study of prospective teachers finds that they are more likely to view the face of black adults as angry compared to the faces of white adults. (2018-07-02)
Bad behavior to significant other in tough times has more impact than positive gestures
Refraining from bad behavior toward a significant other during stressful life events is more important than showing positive behavior, according to a Baylor University study. (2018-06-26)
Food insecurity has greater impact on disadvantaged children
In 2016, 12.9 million children lived in food-insecure households. These children represent a vulnerable population since their developing brains can suffer long-term negative consequences from undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. (2018-06-26)
You don't need to believe in free will to be a nice person, shows new research
Social psychologist Damien Crone (University of Melbourne) and Philosophy professor Neil Levy (Macquarie University and the University of Oxford) conducted a series of studies of 921 of people and found that a person's moral behavior is not tied to their beliefs in free will. (2018-06-25)
Humans are causing mammals to increasingly adopt the nightlife
Human activity is driving many mammals worldwide to be more active at night, when they are less likely to encounter humans, a new study reveals. (2018-06-14)
Digital devices during family time could exacerbate bad behavior
Parents who spend a lot of time on their phones or watching television during family activities such as meals, playtime, and bedtime could influence their long-term relationships with their children. (2018-06-13)
Cannabis does not increase suicidal behavior in psychiatric patients: McMaster
McMaster University researchers have found there is no significant association between cannabis use and suicidal behavior in people with psychiatric disorders. (2018-06-13)
Inside the brains of killer bees
Africanized honeybees, commonly known as 'killer bees,' are much more aggressive than their European counterparts. (2018-06-06)
An abusive boss today might mean a better boss tomorrow
When bosses yell at you, your day can be ruined. (2018-06-04)
Developmental psychotherapy for antisocial adolescents
Working with young offenders is considered difficult activity and often ineffective. (2018-05-18)
Glass-forming ability: fundamental understanding leading to smart design
Researchers studied the glass-forming ability of two simple systems, establishing the 'thermodynamic interface penalty,' which is an indicator of the extent of the structural difference between a crystal and its melt. (2018-05-16)
The evolution of conflict resolution
Recently published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Assistant Professor Christoph Riedl's latest research examines a model that might explain how humans resolve conflict, and what these actions say about biological and social behavior, both now and into the future. (2018-05-10)
Study explores the down side of being dubbed 'class clown'
Being dubbed the class clown by teachers and peers has negative social repercussions for third-grade boys that may portend developmental and academic consequences for them, University of Illinois recreation, sport and tourism professor Lynn A. (2018-05-01)
An AI for deciphering what animals do all day
Researchers show how an algorithm for filtering spam can learn to pick out, from hours of video footage, the full behavioral repertoire of tiny, pond-dwelling Hydra. (2018-04-30)
Comments on social networks also reinforce socialization during adolescence
Without overlooking the risks of using social networks in adolescence, a study analyzes little known information about cybergossiping among high school students/ (2018-04-24)
Millennials aren't getting the message about sun safety and the dangers of tanning
Many millennials lack knowledge about the importance of sunscreen and continue to tan outdoors in part because of low self-esteem and high rates of narcissism that fuel addictive tanning behavior, a new study from Oregon State University-Cascades has found. (2018-04-24)
Animal cyborg: Behavioral control by 'toy' craving circuit
Children love to get toys from parents for their birthday present. (2018-04-23)
Can your dog predict an earthquake? Evidence is shaky, say researchers
For centuries people have claimed that strange behavior by their cats, dogs and even cows can predict an imminent earthquake, but the first rigorous analysis of the phenomenon concludes that there is no strong evidence behind the claim. (2018-04-17)
Modeling prosocial behavior increases helping in 16-month-olds
Shortly after they turn 1, most babies begin to help others, whether by handing their mother an object out of her reach or giving a sibling a toy that has fallen. (2018-04-17)
The neurons the power parenting
Harvard researchers have described, for the first time, how separate pools of neurons control individual aspects of parenting behavior in mice. (2018-04-12)
Sitting is bad for your brain -- not just your metabolism or heart
Studies show that too much sitting, like smoking, increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes and premature death. (2018-04-12)
Neural fingerprints of altruism
For at least 150 years, we know that traumatic brain injury can change several domains of behavior, impairing social behavior or memory, for instance, depending on which brain areas have been damaged. (2018-03-26)
FASEB Journal: Study shows offspring response to maternal diet and male hormone
A novel study published online in The FASEB Journal identifies sex-specific responses to maternal diet and androgen (male hormone) excess among male and female animal offspring. (2018-03-22)
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