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Current Big bang News and Events

Current Big bang News and Events, Big bang News Articles.
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Ancient gas cloud reveals universe's first stars formed quickly
The discovery of a 13 billion-year-old cosmic cloud of gas enabled a team of Carnegie astronomers to perform the earliest-ever measurement of how the universe was enriched with a diversity of chemical elements. (2019-11-08)
Mammals' complex spines are linked to high metabolisms; we're learning how they evolved
Mammals' backbones are weird. They're much more complex than the spines of other land animals like reptiles. (2019-11-07)
Hubble captures a dozen galaxy doppelgangers
This NASA Hubble Space Telescope photo reveals a cosmic kaleidoscope of a remote galaxy that has been split into a dozen multiple images by the effect of gravitational lensing. (2019-11-07)
Hubble captures a dozen sunburst arc doppelgangers
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed a galaxy in the distant regions of the Universe which appears duplicated at least 12 times on the night sky. (2019-11-07)
Discriminating diets of meat-eating dinosaurs
A big problem with dinosaurs is that there seem to be too many meat-eaters. (2019-11-03)
UCF researchers discover mechanisms for the cause of the Big Bang
The origin of the universe started with the Big Bang, but how the supernova explosion ignited has long been a mystery -- until now. (2019-10-31)
Putting the 'bang' in the Big Bang
Physicists at MIT, Kenyon College, and elsewhere have simulated in detail an intermediary phase of the early universe that may have bridged cosmic inflation with the Big Bang. (2019-10-25)
New measurement of Hubble constant adds to cosmic mystery
New measurements of the rate of expansion of the universe, led by astronomers at UC Davis, add to a growing mystery: Estimates of a fundamental constant made with different methods keep giving different results. (2019-10-23)
Deuteron-like heavy dibaryons -- a step towards finding exotic nuclei
Using supercomputer, TIFR's physicists have predicted the existence of deuteron-like exotic nuclei for the first time as well as provided their masses precisely. (2019-10-22)
Going against the flow around a supermassive black hole
At the center of a galaxy called NGC 1068, a supermassive black hole hides within a thick doughnut-shaped cloud of dust and gas. (2019-10-15)
New understanding of the evolution of cosmic electromagnetic fields
Electromagnetism was discovered 200 years ago, but the origin of the very large electromagnetic fields in the universe is still a mystery. (2019-10-15)
Unique sticky particles formed by harnessing chaos
New research from North Carolina State University shows that unique materials with distinct properties akin to those of gecko feet - the ability to stick to just about any surface -- can be created by harnessing liquid-driven chaos to produce soft polymer microparticles with hierarchical branching on the micro- and nanoscale. (2019-10-14)
CRISPR-BEST prevents genome instability
Scientists from The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability has developed CRISPR-BEST, a new genome editing tool for actinomycetes. (2019-10-09)
This is how a 'fuzzy' universe may have looked
Scientists at MIT, Princeton University, and Cambridge University have found that the early universe, and the very first galaxies, would have looked very different depending on the nature of dark matter. (2019-10-03)
Glowing gas reveals faint filaments of the cosmic web
Faintly glowing wisps of gas, excited by the intense light of surrounding star-forming galaxies, have given astronomers a rare glimpse of one of the Universe's largest but most elusive features -- the intergalactic filaments of the cosmic web. (2019-10-03)
Record breaking observations find most remote protocluster of galaxies
An international team of astronomers with participation by researchers from DAWN, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen has discovered a protocluster of galaxies 13.0 billion light years away. (2019-10-01)
Growing old together: A sharper look at black holes and their host galaxies
The 'special relationship' between supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their hosts -- something astronomers and physicists have observed for quite a while -- can now be understood as a bond that begins early in a galaxy's formation and has a say in how both the galaxy and the SMBH at its center grow over time, according to a new study from Yale University. (2019-09-30)
A mouse or an elephant: what species fights infection more effectively?
Hamilton College Assistant Professor of Biology Cynthia Downs led a study with co-authors from North Dakota State University, University of California, Davis, Eckerd College, and University of South Florida that investigated whether body mass was related to concentrations of two important immune cell types in the blood among hundreds of species of mammals ranging from tiny Jamaican fruit bats (~40 g) to giant killer whales (~5,600 kg). (2019-09-25)
Big cities breed partners in crime
Researchers have long known that bigger cities disproportionately generate more crime. (2019-09-19)
From primordial black holes new clues to dark matter
Moving through cosmic forests and spider webs in deep space in search of answers on the origin of the Cosmos. (2019-09-17)
A novel tool to probe fundamental matter
The origin of matter remains a complex and open question. (2019-09-16)
A global assessment of Earth's early anthropogenic transformation
A global archaeological assessment of ancient land use reveals that prehistoric human activity had already substantially transformed the ecology of Earth by 3,000 years ago, even before intensive farming and the domestication of plants and animals. (2019-08-29)
Providing a solution to the worst-ever prediction in physics
The cosmological constant introduced a century ago by Albert Einstein is a thorn in the side of physicists. (2019-08-29)
Finding a cosmic fog within shattered intergalactic pancakes
In a new study, Yale postdoctoral associate Nir Mandelker and professor Frank C. van den Bosch report on the most detailed simulation ever of a large patch of the intergalactic medium (IGM). (2019-08-13)
Doubling down
Over the recent decade, total human impacts to the world's oceans have, on average, nearly doubled and could double again in the next decade without adequate action. (2019-08-13)
Virtual 'universe machine' sheds light on galaxy evolution
By creating millions of virtual universes and comparing them to observations of actual galaxies, a University of Arizona-led research team has made discoveries that present a powerful new approach for studying galaxy formation. (2019-08-09)
Dark matter may be older than the big bang, study suggests
Dark matter, which researchers believe make up about 80% of the universe's mass, is one of the most elusive mysteries in modern physics. (2019-08-07)
Anaemic star carries the mark of its ancient ancestor
In a paper published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters, researchers led by Dr Thomas Nordlander of the ARC Centre of Excellence for All Sky Astrophysics in 3 Dimensions (ASTRO 3D) confirm the existence of an ultra-metal-poor red giant star, located in the halo of the Milky Way, on the other side of the Galaxy about 35,000 light-years from Earth. (2019-08-01)
Researchers recreate the sun's solar wind and plasma 'burps' on Earth
A new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison physicists mimicked solar winds in the lab, confirming how they develop and providing an Earth-bound model for the future study of solar physics. (2019-07-29)
A peek at the birth of the universe
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is set to become the largest radio telescope on Earth. (2019-07-24)
Balancing beams: Multiple laser beamlets show better electron and ion acceleration
Researchers at Osaka University show how creating interference patterns with four laser beamlets improves the efficiency of energy transfer when accelerating electron and ion beams. (2019-07-24)
DistME: A fast and elastic distributed matrix computation engine using GPUs
DGIST announced on July 4 that Professor Min-Soo Kim's team in the Department of Information and Communication Engineering developed the DistME (Distributed Matrix Engine) technology that can analyze 100 times more data 14 times faster than the existing technologies. (2019-07-17)
New measurement of universe's expansion rate is 'stuck in the middle'
A team of collaborators from Carnegie and the University of Chicago used red giant stars that were observed by the Hubble Space Telescope to make an entirely new measurement of how fast the universe is expanding, throwing their hats into the ring of a hotly contested debate. (2019-07-16)
Cincinnati researchers say early puberty in girls may be 'big bang theory' for migraine
Adolescent girls who reach puberty at an earlier age may also have a greater chance of developing migraine headaches, according to new research from investigators at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine. (2019-07-11)
At last, an AI that outperforms humans in six-player poker
Achieving a milestone in artificial intelligence (AI) by moving beyond settings involving only two players, researchers present an AI that can outperform top human professionals in six-player no-limit Texas hold'em poker, the most popular form of poker played today. (2019-07-11)
Surveys fail to capture big five personality traits in non-WEIRD populations
Questions commonly used to explore the ''Big Five'' personality traits--Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism--generally fail to measure the intended personality traits in developing countries, according to a new study. (2019-07-10)
Could vacuum physics be revealed by laser-driven microbubble?
Scientists at Osaka University discovered a novel mechanism which they refer to as microbubble implosion (MBI) in 2018. (2019-07-09)
Supercomputer shows 'Chameleon Theory' could change how we think about gravity
Supercomputer simulations of galaxies have shown that Einstein's theory of General Relativity might not be the only way to explain how gravity works or how galaxies form. (2019-07-08)
New method may resolve difficulty in measuring universe's expansion
Radio telescope observations have made it possible for astronomers to use mergers of neutron-star pairs as a valuable new tool for measuring the Universe's expansion. (2019-07-08)
The highest energy gamma rays discovered by the Tibet ASgamma experiment
The Tibet ASgamma experiment, a China-Japan joint research project, has discovered the highest energy cosmic gamma rays ever observed from an astrophysical source - in this case, the 'Crab Nebula.' The experiment detected gamma rays ranging from > 100 Teraelectron volts (TeV) to an estimated 450 TeV. (2019-07-03)
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