Current Big bang News and Events

Current Big bang News and Events, Big bang News Articles.
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Study reveals true origin of oldest evidence of animals
Two teams of scientists have resolved a longstanding controversy surrounding the origins of complex life on Earth. The joint studies found molecular fossils extracted from 635-million-year-old rocks aren't the earliest evidence of animals, but instead common algae. (2020-11-23)

Keep the data coming
A continuous data supply ensures data-intensive simulations can run at maximum speed. (2020-11-09)

Smaller earthquakes "with ambition" produce the most ground shaking
An earthquake of magnitude 8.0 or larger will almost always cause strong shaking, but a new study suggests that smaller earthquakes--those around magnitude 5.5 or so--are the cause of most occurrences of strong shaking at a 60-kilometer (37-mile) distance. (2020-11-04)

Galaxies in the very early universe were surprisingly mature
Massive galaxies were already much more mature in the early universe than previously expected. This is the conclusion of an international team of astronomers who studied distant galaxies with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The result is now published by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. (2020-10-30)

Surprisingly mature galaxies in the early Universe
When the Universe was only a tenth of its current age its galaxies experienced a growth spurt. It was this period that the scientists in the ALPINE project focused on when they used ESO's ALMA telescope to carry out the first ever large survey of distant galaxies. To their surprise, these galaxies observed in the early stages of their life were far more mature than expected. (2020-10-27)

Anemic star cluster breaks metal-poor record
In a surprising discovery, astronomers using two Maunakea Observatories - W. M. Keck Observatory and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) - have found a star cluster in the Andromeda Galaxy that contains a record-breaking low amount of metals, calling into question the so-called 'metallicity-floor' for massive globular star clusters. (2020-10-15)

Empathy prevents COVID-19 spreading
The more empathetic we are, the more likely it is that we will keep our distance and use face masks to prevent coronavirus spreading. This study demonstrates that it is possible to increase our empathy and willingness to follow advice on social distancing and face masks. (2020-10-13)

Scientists find neurochemicals have unexpectedly profound roles in the human brain
In first-of-their-kind observations in the human brain, an international team of researchers has revealed two well-known neurochemicals -- dopamine and serotonin -- are at work at sub-second speeds to shape how people perceive the world and take action based on their perception. (2020-10-12)

Astronomers turn up the heavy metal to shed light on star formation
Astronomers from The University of Western Australia's node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) have developed a new way to study star formation in galaxies from the dawn of time to today. Using a new algorithm to model the energy and wavelengths of light coming from almost 7000 nearby galaxies, the researchers succeeded in reconstructing when most of the stars in the Universe formed--in agreement with telescope observations for the first time. (2020-10-06)

ESO telescope spots galaxies trapped in the web of a supermassive black hole
With the help of ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have found six galaxies lying around a supermassive black hole when the Universe was less than a billion years old. This is the first time such a close grouping has been seen so soon after the Big Bang and the finding helps us better understand how supermassive black holes formed and grew so quickly. It supports the theory that black holes can grow rapidly within large structures which contain plenty of gas to fuel them. (2020-10-01)

Gravity causes homogeneity of the universe
Gravity can accelerate the homogenization of space-time as the universe evolves. This insight is based on theoretical studies of the physicist David Fajman of the University of Vienna. The results have been published in the journal 'Physical Review Letters'. (2020-09-24)

Biggest fish in the sea are girls
Female whale sharks grow more slowly than males but end up being larger, research suggests. (2020-09-16)

Elements of surprise: neutron stars contribute little, but something's making gold, research finds
Neutron star collisions do not create the quantity of chemical elements previously assumed, a new analysis of galaxy evolution finds. The research also reveals that current models can't explain the amount of gold in the cosmos - creating an astronomical mystery. The work has produced a new-look Periodic Table, showing the stellar origins of naturally occurring elements from carbon to uranium. (2020-09-15)

Big answers from tiny particles
A team of physicists led by Kanazawa University demonstrate a theoretical mechanism that would explain the tiny value for the mass of neutrinos and point out that key operators of the mechanism can be probed by current and future experiments. This work may provide a breakthrough for big philosophical quandaries, including why matter exists. (2020-09-14)

Scientists detect first-of-its-kind 'intermediate-mass' black hole
An international research collaboration including Northwestern University astronomers has witnessed the birth of an ''intermediate-mass'' black hole. This is the first conclusive discovery of an intermediate-mass black hole, an object which has long eluded astronomers. The cosmic event, its energy detected on Earth in the form of gravitational waves, is the most massive black hole merger yet observed in gravitational waves. Two black holes likely collided and merged to create a more massive black hole. (2020-09-02)

UH Mānoa researchers predict location of novel candidate for mysterious dark energy
UH researchers explain what may be the cause of the universe's accelerating growth. (2020-09-01)

Housing First proves cost effective especially for the most-vulnerable homeless group
Canadians spend big money dealing with the consequences of homelessness, but the money spent could be far more effective. According to a new McGill-led analysis, housing homeless people with severe mental illness is even more cost-effective than housing homeless people with moderate needs. A Housing-First strategy aimed at helping these individuals regain and keep permanent housing generates savings equal to about two-thirds of its cost. (2020-08-25)

One more hit from rare Earth: Efficient coherent spin manipulation by the electric field
Researchers used rare earth ions to efficiently couple the electric and magnetic behaviors of material. They realized convenient coherent controlling of electron spins with the electric field, aiming at fabricating applicable quantum computation devices. (2020-08-21)

Shrinking Tasmanian tigers: Resizing an Australian icon
The thylacine, that famous extinct Australian icon colloquially known as the Tasmanian Tiger, is revealed to have been only about half as big as once thought - not a ''big'' bad wolf after all. (2020-08-18)

Small towns have highest risk of intimate partner violence
Despite common perceptions that big cities have more violence, women living in small towns are most at risk of violence from current or former partners. The study analyzed the responses of more than 570,000 women from the National Crime Victimization Survey from 1994-2015. Women from small towns were 27% more likely to be victims of intimate partner violence than women from the center of big cities and 42% more likely than suburban women. (2020-08-06)

Break it down: A new way to address common computing problem
A new algorithm developed in the lab of Jr-Shin Li at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis provides a framework for solving complex linear inverse problems that doesn't require a supercomputer and also enhances security and privacy. (2020-08-04)

Surprisingly young galaxy breaks low-oxygen record
A galaxy in the constellation Hercules that only recently started making stars has broken the record for having the lowest level of oxygen ever seen in a young galaxy. Astronomers used two Maunakea Observatories combined with machine learning to find the rare object. (2020-07-31)

Cosmic tango between the very small and the very large
A new study using the theory of quantum loop cosmology accounts for two major mysteries about the large-scale structure of our universe. (2020-07-29)

New approach refines the Hubble's constant and age of universe
Using known distances of 50 galaxies from Earth to refine calculations in Hubble's constant, a research team led by a University of Oregon astronomer estimates the age of the universe at 12.6 billion years. (2020-07-27)

Breakthrough in deciphering birth of supermassive black holes
A research team led by Cardiff University scientists say they are closer to understanding how a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is born thanks to a new technique that has enabled them to zoom in on one of these enigmatic cosmic objects in unprecedented detail. (2020-07-13)

Study reveals secret life of lithium in sun-like stars: Created not just destroyed
A new study led by Prof. ZHAO Gang and Dr. Yerra Bharat Kumar from National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) provides a fresh understanding of both how lithium is made, and how it is destroyed. (2020-07-06)

Monster black hole found in the early universe
Astronomers have discovered the second-most distant quasar ever found using three Maunakea Observatories in Hawai'i. It is the first quasar to receive an indigenous Hawaiian name, Poniua'ena. Data from W. M. Keck Observatory show the supermassive black hole powering Poniua'ena is surprisingly massive, challenging current theories of how supermassive black holes formed and grew in the young universe. (2020-06-25)

Newly discovered plant gene could boost phosphorus intake
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered an important gene in plants that could help agricultural crops collaborate better with underground fungi -- providing them with wider root networks and helping them to absorb phosphorus. The discovery has the potential to increase agricultural efficiency and benefit the environment. (2020-06-16)

New distance measurements bolster challenge to basic model of universe
A cosmic measurement technique independent of all others adds strong evidence pointing to a problem with the current theoretical model describing the composition and evolution of the Universe. (2020-06-11)

Scientists carry out first space-based measurement of neutron lifetime
Scientists have found a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time -- a discovery that could teach us more about the early universe. (2020-06-11)

New study finds surface disturbance can limit mule deer migration
Researchers used 145 migrations from 56 individual deer to examine disturbance effects at various scales. Results consistently showed that mule deer use of migration corridors steeply declined when surface disturbance from roads and well pads surpassed 3%. Mule deer were able to migrate through areas where surface disturbance was lower. (2020-06-10)

The broken mirror: Can parity violation in molecules finally be measured?
Scientists have long tried to experimentally demonstrate a certain symmetry property of the weak interaction - parity violation -- in molecules. A new interdisciplinary effort led by a Mainz research group has now shown a realistic path to demonstrating this phenomenon. The approach includes aspects of nuclear, elementary particle, atomic and molecular physics as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). 'Molecular parity nonconservation in nuclear spin couplings' is published in the current issue of the journal Physical Review Research. (2020-06-03)

Hubble makes surprising find in the early universe
New results from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope suggest the formation of the first stars and galaxies in the early Universe took place sooner than previously thought. A European team of astronomers have found no evidence of the first generation of stars, known as Population III stars, as far back as when the Universe was just 500 million years old. (2020-06-03)

Class of stellar explosions found to be galactic producers of lithium
A team of researchers, led by astrophysicist Sumner Starrfield of Arizona State University (ASU), has combined theory with both observations and laboratory studies and determined that a class of stellar explosions, called classical novae, are responsible for most of the lithium in our galaxy and solar system. (2020-06-01)

Cosmic bursts unveil universe's missing matter
Astronomers have used mysterious fast radio bursts to solve a decades-old mystery of 'missing matter', long predicted to exist in the Universe but never detected -- until now. The researchers have now found all of the missing 'normal' matter in the vast space between stars and galaxies, as detailed today in the journal Nature. (2020-05-27)

Quantum simulators for gauge theories
To simulate in a laboratory what happens in particle accelerators has been an ambitious goal in the study of the fundamental forces of nature pursued by high-energy physicists for many years. Now, thanks to research conducted by the groups of statistical physics of SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati and the ''Abdus Salam'' International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), that goal is closer to reach. (2020-05-26)

Astronomers see 'cosmic ring of fire,' 11 billion years ago
Astronomers have captured an image of a super-rare type of galaxy -- described as a 'cosmic ring of fire' -- as it existed 11 billion years ago. (2020-05-25)

Deep learning: A new engine for ecological resource research
Deep learning is driven by big data, which brings new opportunities for target classification, detection, semantic segmentation, instance segmentation, and regression in ecological resource research. However, there are still great challenges in the standardization and sharing of data, the universality and interpretability of algorithms, and the enrichment and intelligence of applications. A recent study clarified the aforementioned frontier issues, which was published in the 'Science China Terrae' journal. (2020-05-21)

ALMA discovers massive rotating disk in early universe
In our 13.8 billion-year-old universe, most galaxies like our Milky Way form gradually, reaching their large mass relatively late. But a new discovery made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of a massive rotating disk galaxy, seen when the universe was only ten percent of its current age, challenges the traditional models of galaxy formation. This research appears on May 20, 2020, in the journal Nature. (2020-05-20)

COVID-19 places added prenatal stress on mother and child that could have lasting impact
An international consortium of researchers have identified particular sources of prenatal stress, as experienced by mothers, that have a direct effect on a child's subsequent mental health. (2020-05-11)

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