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Current Biological sciences News and Events, Biological sciences News Articles.
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Eavesdropping crickets drop from the sky to evade capture by bats
Researchers have uncovered the highly efficient strategy used by a group of crickets to distinguish the calls of predatory bats from the incessant noises of the nocturnal jungle. (2020-05-17)
The butterfly effect: Climate change could cause decline of some alpine butterfly species
The long-term effects of climate change suggests that the butterfly effect is at work on butterflies in the alpine regions of North America, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists -- and the predictions don't bode well. (2020-05-12)
Ancient reptile had mammal-like tooth enamel, study shows
A new study by University of Alberta paleontologists shows that one type of ancient reptiles evolved a special type of tooth enamel, similar to that of mammals, with high resistance to wear and tear. (2020-05-12)
GSA's journal's add two articles on COVID-19 and aging; plus webinar on confronting ageism
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are now publishing scientific articles on COVID-19. (2020-04-30)
GSA's journals begin publishing peer-reviewed research on aging and COVID-19
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are now publishing scientific articles on COVID-19. (2020-04-22)
New algorithm to help process biological images
Skoltech researchers have presented a new biological image processing method that accurately picks out specific biological objects in complex images. (2020-04-21)
Coronavirus (COVID-19) testing, next steps, and the role of small business
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2020-04-13)
Reframing biosecurity governance as an experimental space, including as relates to handling COVID-19
Biological science and its applications are rapidly evolving, and to keep up with emerging security concerns, governance of biosecurity applications should evolve as well. (2020-04-09)
Researchers uncover importance of aligning biological clock with day-night cycles
UC San Diego scientists studying bacteria have identified the roots of a behavior that is regulated by the circadian clock. (2020-04-08)
Cooperative male dolphins match the tempo of each other's calls
When it comes to working together, male dolphins coordinate their behavior just like us. (2020-03-31)
Baldness gene discovery reveals origin of hairy alpine plants
Scientists have solved a puzzle that has long baffled botanists -- why some plants on high mountainsides are hairy while their low-lying cousins are bald. (2020-02-27)
Deaf moths evolved noise-cancelling scales to evade prey
Some species of deaf moths can absorb as much as 85 per cent of the incoming sound energy from predatory bats -- who use echolocation to detect them. (2020-02-25)
Living cell imaging technique sheds light on molecular view of obesity
Researchers have developed novel probes to track cellular events that can lead to obesity. (2020-02-24)
Tiny, erratic protein motor movements revealed
The smallest proteins travel in our cells, completing deeply important tasks to keep our molecular mechanisms moving. (2020-02-14)
New measure of biological age can predict health risks
People age in different ways. Biological age is a metric that scientists use to predict health risks, the relevance of which can be enhanced by combining different markers. (2020-02-11)
Studying the geometry of a common skin disease
In a recent study from Hiroshima University, researchers turned to mathematics to predict hive patterns in humans. (2020-01-28)
Brilliant iridescence can conceal as well as attract
A new study shows for the first time that the striking iridescent colours seen in some animals increase their chances of survival against predators by acting as a means of camouflage. (2020-01-23)
Scientists uncover how an explosion of new genes explain the origin of land plants
Scientists have made a significant discovery about the genetic origins of how plants evolved from living in water to land 470 million years ago. (2020-01-16)
Study unravels new insights into a Parkinson's disease protein
The new study explores alpha-synuclein's basic properties, with a focus on a section of the protein known as the non-amyloidal component (NAC). (2020-01-16)
Nitrogen-fixing genes could help grow more food using fewer resources
Scientists have transferred a collection of genes into plant-colonizing bacteria that let them draw nitrogen from the air and turn it into ammonia, a natural fertilizer. (2020-01-15)
Study suggests biological clock is key to reducing heart damage from radiation therapy
A new study suggests that the biological clock is involved in heart toxicity from radiation therapy and could be harnessed as part of a preventive strategy. (2020-01-13)
Better science through peer review
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2020-01-08)
Better anchor roots help crops grow in poor soils
A newly discovered plant metabolite that promotes anchor root growth may prove valuable in helping crops grow in nutrient-deficient soils. (2019-12-30)
Tel Aviv University study finds widespread misinterpretation of gene expression data
New research by a Tel Aviv University group identifies a frequent technical bias in data generated by RNA-seq technology, one of the most widely used methods in molecular biology, which often leads to false results. (2019-12-18)
Research brief: New methods promise to speed up development of new plant varieties
University of Minnesota researchers developed new methods that will make it significantly faster to produce gene-edited plants. (2019-12-16)
New insights into the effect of aging on cardiovascular disease
Aging adults are more likely to have - and die from - cardiovascular disease than their younger counterparts. (2019-12-10)
Was Earth's oxygenation a gradual, not step-wise, process -- driven by internal feedbacks?
The oxygenation of Earth's surface -- which transformed the planet into a habitable haven for all life as we know it -- may have been the consequence of global biogeochemical feedbacks, rather than the product of discrete planetary-scale biological and tectonic revolutions as proposed, according to a new study. (2019-12-10)
Speedy and precise multicolor imaging of biomolecules now possible
For the first time, researchers can track biological molecules with unprecedented speed and precision thanks to the use of multi-metallic nanoparticles. (2019-12-09)
Dinosaur skull turns paleontology assumptions on their head
A team of researchers at the University of Alberta has unearthed a well-preserved Styracosaurus skull -- and its facial imperfections have implications for how paleontologists identify new species of dinosaurs. (2019-11-25)
An evapotranspiration deficit drought index to detect drought impacts on ecosystems
The difference between actual and potential evapotranspiration, technically termed a standardized evapotranspiration deficit drought index (SEDI), can more sensitively capture the biological changes of ecosystems in response to the dynamics of drought intensity, compared with indices based on precipitation and temperature. (2019-10-24)
BU researchers accurately estimate the sex of skeletons based on elbow features
An elbow can help determine the sex of a skeleton. (2019-10-23)
Study reveals fundamental insight into how memory changes with age
New research from King's College London and The Open University could help explain why memory in old age is much less flexible than in young adulthood. (2019-10-17)
Threshold-dependent gene drives in wild populations
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2019-10-09)
Study shows the biological clock influences immune response efficiency
According to a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, the biological clock influences immune response efficacy. (2019-09-24)
Not just images
Hebrew University scientists have successfully transformed an MRI from a diagnostic camera into a device that can record changes in the biological makeup of brain tissue. (2019-09-05)
Body's ageing process accelerated by DNA changes, study suggests
DNA changes throughout a person's life can significantly increase their susceptibility to heart conditions and other age-related diseases, research suggests. (2019-09-03)
Research Brief: New type of visual filter discovered in an unlikely place
A University of Minnesota-led research team recently discovered a new way animals can modify their vision. (2019-08-29)
Hi-tech bacteria gene tool could prove productive, study finds
Bacteria could be used to produce large quantities of medicines and fuels using a new gene programming technique, research suggests. (2019-08-26)
Separate polarization and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators
Fiddler crabs see the polarization of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or a predator. (2019-08-21)
How coastal mud holds the key to climate cooling gas
Bacteria found in muddy marshes, estuaries and coastal sediment synthesise one of the Earth's most abundant climate cooling gases -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2019-08-19)
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