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Current Biomass News and Events

Current Biomass News and Events, Biomass News Articles.
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KIST uesed eco-friendly composite catalyst and ultrasound to remove pollutants from water
Developed eco-friendly, low-cost, and high-efficiency wastewater processing catalyst made from agricultural byproduct, and High efficiency and removal rate achieved through application of ultrasound stimulation, leading to high expectation for the development of an environmental hormone removal system. (2019-07-19)
Study reveals unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest
Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon. (2019-07-18)
The physiology of survival
Bacteria do not simply perish in hunger phases fortuitously; rather, the surrounding cells have a say as well. (2019-07-17)
Effectiveness of using natural enemies to combat pests depends on surroundings
A new study of cabbage crops in New York -- a state industry worth close to $60 million in 2017, according to the USDA -- reports for the first time that the effectiveness of releasing natural enemies to combat pests depends on the landscape surrounding the field. (2019-07-15)
Scientists create new 'y-shaped' synthetic consortium for efficient bio-manufacturing
A group of Chinese scientists have recently developed a new synthetic consortium for efficient pentose-hexose co-utilization that could improve bio-manufacturing. (2019-07-08)
Left out to dry: A more efficient way to harvest algae biomass
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba develop a new system for evaporating the water from algae biomass with reusable nanoporous graphene, which can lead to cheaper, more environmentally friendly biofuels and fine chemicals. (2019-07-08)
Natural biodiversity protects rural farmers' incomes from tropical weather shocks
A big data study covering more than 7,500 households across 23 tropical countries shows that natural biodiversity could be effective insurance for rural farmers against drought and other weather-related shocks. (2019-06-27)
Undercounting of agroforestry skews climate change mitigation planning and reporting
Scientists expose the lack of measurement of and reporting on agroforestry in international climate agreements. (2019-06-26)
Exposure to air pollution in India is associated with more hypertension in women
The CHAI project assessed the link between fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon and blood pressure in over 5,500 people living in a peri-urban area near Hyderabad city (2019-06-25)
Symbiotic upcycling: Turning 'low value' compounds into biomass
Kentron, a bacterial symbiont of ciliates, turns cellular waste products into biomass. (2019-06-25)
Biochar may boost carbon storage, but benefits to germination and growth appear scant
Biochar may not be the miracle soil additive that many farmers and researchers hoped it to be, according to a new University of Illinois study. (2019-06-19)
New evidence supports the presence of microbes in the placenta
Researchers report visual evidence supporting the presence of bacteria within the microarchitecture of the placental tissue. (2019-06-18)
Modified enzyme can increase second-generation ethanol production
Using a protein produced by a fungus that lives in the Amazon, Brazilian researchers developed a molecule capable of increasing glucose release from biomass for fermentation. (2019-06-14)
New microorganism for algae biomass to produce alternative fuels
Professor Gyoo Yeol Jung and his research team utilized algae that grow three times faster than starch crops and succeeded in producing biofuel and biochemicals. (2019-06-11)
2019 'dead zone' may be the second largest on record
A recent forecast of the size of the 'Dead Zone' in the northern Gulf of Mexico for late July 2019 is that it will cover 8,717-square-miles of the bottom of the continental shelf off Louisiana and Texas. (2019-06-10)
Light energy and biomass can be converted to diesel fuel and hydrogen
A research group led by Professor WANG Feng at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed a method to produce diesel fuel and hydrogen by exploiting light energy (solar energy or artificial light energy) and biomass-derived feedstocks. (2019-06-10)
Grassland areas should be chosen wisely
According to researchers from the Department of Agroecology at Aarhus University, choosing the best areas to convert from cereals to grasslands depends on whether you prioritize improvement of nature and the aquatic environment, how much biomass you can produce, or how much land is needed to so do -- or a combination. (2019-06-03)
Researchers find seaweed helps trap carbon dioxide in sediment
Florida State University researchers working with colleagues in the United Kingdom have found that these slimy macroalgae play an important role in permanently removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. (2019-06-03)
Plankton as a climate driver instead of the sun?
Fluctuations in the orbital parameters of the Earth are considered to be the trigger for long-term climatic fluctuations such as ice ages. (2019-05-22)
What makes a place a home?
Diver-led visual surveys at 11 mesophotic reef sites around Bermuda found that high densities of lionfish were associated with both higher abundances of prey fish and higher prey fish biomass. (2019-05-21)
Giving rural Indians what they want increases demand for cookstoves
Adopting common business practices, such as robust supply chains, market analysis and rebates, can increase the adoption of improved cookstoves by as much as 50% in rural India, according to a new study led by Duke University researchers. (2019-05-20)
Intensive silviculture accelerates Atlantic rainforest biodiversity regeneration
The study shows the advantages of herbicide spraying and intensive fertilization in reforestation programs to mitigate the effects of climate change. (2019-05-17)
Urban trees 'live fast, die young' compared to those in rural forests
Urban trees grow more quickly but die faster than rural trees, resulting in a net loss of street-tree carbon storage over time, according to a study published May 8, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ian Smith of Boston University, US and colleagues. (2019-05-08)
Industry-ready process makes plastics chemical from plant sugars
A team from the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center and the University of Wisconsin-Madison describe an efficient and economically feasible process for producing HMF, a versatile plant-derived chemical considered crucial for building a renewable economy. (2019-05-03)
India could meet air quality standards by cutting household fuel use
India could make a major dent in air pollution by curbing emissions from dirty household fuels such as wood, dung, coal and kerosene, shows a new analysis led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and the India Institute of Technology. (2019-05-02)
New view of how ocean 'pumps' impact climate change
A new Rochester study has found that factors such as wind, currents, and even small fish play a larger role in transferring and storing carbon from the surface of the ocean to the deep oceans than was previously thought. (2019-04-25)
Maximizing conservation benefits
Overexploitation and population collapse pose significant threats to marine fish stocks across the globe. (2019-04-25)
Scientists identify a novel target for corn straw utilization
A team of scientists led by Prof. FU Chunxiang from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology completed the identification of bm5 mutant. (2019-04-19)
Green plastic production made easy
A one-step method enables scalable and more environmentally friendly production of plant-derived plastic monomers, paving the way towards the mass production of a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based materials. (2019-04-16)
Number of nonsmokers with COPD on the rise
The global burden of COPD is high, and prevalence of nonsmokers with COPD has been increasing. (2019-04-09)
Excellent catering: How a bacterium feeds an entire flatworm
In the sandy bottom of warm coastal waters lives Paracatenula -- a small worm that has neither mouth, nor gut. (2019-04-08)
Carbon-negative power generation for China
Researchers from the Harvard and China have analyzed technical and economic viability for China to move towards carbon-negative electric power generation. (2019-04-08)
Manure application changes with winter crop can cut nitrogen loss, boost profits
Dairy farmers in the Northeast can improve water quality and boost the profitability of their operations by changing the timing and method of applying manure to their fields in the fall, along with planting rye as a cover crop between corn crops -- or by double-cropping rye and corn, according to Penn State researchers. (2019-04-02)
Speedier stomata in optogenetically enhanced plants improve growth and conserve water
By introducing an extra ion channel into the stomata of mustard plants, researchers have developed a new a way to speed up the stomatal response in their leaves. (2019-03-28)
Old for new, using ancient genetic variation to supercharge wheat
A global, collaborative effort led by the Earlham Institute, UK and CIMMYT, Mexico sheds light on the genetic basis of biomass accumulation and efficiency in use of light, both of which are bottlenecks in yield improvement in wheat. (2019-03-27)
Microorganisms are the main emitters of carbon in Amazonian waters
A study performed with microorganisms inhabiting floodplains, which comprises 20 percent of the whole Amazon, showed that the microbial food chain produces 10 times more CO2 than the classical food chain, mostly by decomposing organic matter. (2019-03-26)
The struggle for life in the Dead Sea sediments: Necrophagy as a survival mechanism
The Dead Sea is not completely dead. The most saline lake on Earth (more than 10 times saltier than sea water) is a harsh environment where only salt-loving microbes from the Archaea domain, known as extreme halophiles, are able to survive. (2019-03-25)
Bright skies for plant-based jet fuels
With an estimated daily fuel demand of more than 5 million barrels per day, the global aviation sector is incredibly energy-intensive and almost entirely reliant on petroleum-based fuels. (2019-03-19)
Converting biomass by applying mechanical force
German nanoscientists have succeeded in demonstrating a new reaction mechanism to cleave cellulose efficiently. (2019-03-14)
Protected areas could help large herbivores bounce back after war
Large herbivore populations can substantially recover after war-induced declines, given that protected area management is provided, according to a study published March 13 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marc Stalmans of Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, and colleagues. (2019-03-13)
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