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Current Biomedical engineering News and Events

Current Biomedical engineering News and Events, Biomedical engineering News Articles.
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New technique for engineering living materials and patterns
A new method for engineering living materials called 'MeniFluidics', made by researchers at the University of Warwick could see a transformation in tissue engineering and bio-art, as well as new ways to research cellular interactions. (2020-06-05)
Kirigami grips could help seniors keep their footing
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and MIT have developed pop-up shoe grips, inspired by snake skin, that can increase friction between the shoe and the ground. (2020-06-01)
A remote control for neurons
A team led by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University has created a new technology that enhances scientists' ability to communicate with neural cells using light. (2020-06-01)
Researchers incorporate computer vision and uncertainty into AI for robotic prosthetics
Researchers have developed new software that can be integrated with existing hardware to enable people using robotic prosthetics or exoskeletons to walk in a safer, more natural manner on different types of terrain. (2020-05-27)
New technique offers higher resolution molecular imaging and analysis
The new approach from Northwestern Engineering could help researchers understand more complicated biomolecular interactions and characterize cells and diseases at the single-molecule level. (2020-05-27)
New urine testing method holds promise for kidney stone sufferers
An improved urine-testing system for people suffering from kidney stones inspired by nature and proposed by researchers from Penn State and Stanford University may enable patients to receive results within 30 minutes instead of the current turnaround time of a week or more. (2020-05-22)
Digital health in the COVID-19 pandemic
Artificial intelligence, machine learning, blockchain, and other key digital technology applications will play a vital role addressing the new healthcare challenges triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-14)
Nanofiber membranes transformed into 3D scaffolds
Researchers combined gas foaming and 3D molding technologies to quickly transform electrospun membranes into complex 3D shapes for biomedical applications. (2020-05-12)
Peptides that can be taken as a pill
Peptides represent a billion-dollar market in the pharmaceutical industry, but they can generally only be taken as injections to avoid degradation by stomach enzymes. (2020-05-11)
COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering
Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-08)
Plasma medicine research highlights antibacterial effects and potential uses
As interest in the application of plasma medicine -- the use of low-temperature plasma (LTP) created by an electrical discharge to address medical problems -- continues to grow, so does the need for research advancements proving its capabilities and potential impacts on the health care industry. (2020-05-08)
Gentler, safer hair dye based on synthetic melanin
Northwestern University researchers have developed a new hair dye process that is much milder than traditional hair dyes by using synthetic melanin to mimic natural human hair pigmentation. (2020-04-30)
Biofabrication drives tissue engineering in 2019
In the quest to engineer replacement tissues and organs for improving human health, biofabrication has emerged as a crucial set of technologies that enable the control of precise architecture and organization. (2020-04-29)
Light-based deep brain stimulation relieves symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have used light-based deep brain stimulation to treat motor dysfunction in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. (2020-04-27)
A breakthrough in estimating the size of a (mostly hidden) network
A newly discovered connection between control theory and network dynamical systems could help estimate the size of a network even when a small portion is accessible. (2020-04-22)
Tetracycline-family antibiotics may offer early diagnostic for degenerative eye disease
Utilizing human cadaver retinas containing drusen, the researchers used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to measure the light emission from tetracycline staining within those ocular mineral deposits. (2020-04-21)
WashU engineer awarded federal funding for rapid COVID-19 test
Engineers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. (2020-04-20)
Stabilizing brain-computer interfaces
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) have published research in Nature Biomedical Engineering that will drastically improve brain-computer interfaces and their ability to remain stabilized during use, greatly reducing or potentially eliminating the need to recalibrate these devices during or between experiments. (2020-04-20)
Mind over body: The search for stronger brain-computer interfaces
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University are working on understanding how the brain works when learning tasks with the help of brain-computer interface technology. (2020-04-20)
Co-delivery of IL-10 and NT-3 to enhance spinal cord injury repair
Spinal cord injury (SCI) creates a complex microenvironment that is not conducive to repair; growth factors are in short supply, whereas factors that inhibit regeneration are plentiful. (2020-04-17)
RIT researchers build micro-device to detect bacteria, viruses
Ke Du and Blanca Lapizco-Encinas, both faculty-researchers in RIT's Kate Gleason College of Engineering, worked with an international team to collaborate on the design of a next-generation miniature lab device that uses magnetic nano-beads to isolate minute bacterial particles that cause diseases. (2020-04-17)
Acoustic growth factor patterning
For optimally engineered tissues, it is important that biological cues are delivered with appropriate timing and to specific locations. (2020-04-15)
Researchers develop synthetic scaffolds to heal injured tendons and ligaments
Top biomedical engineering researcher develops synthetic scaffolds for tendon and ligament regeneration. (2020-04-14)
Keratin scaffolds could advance regenerative medicine and tissue engineering for humans
Researchers at Mossakowski Medical Research Center of the Polish Academy of Science have developed a simple method for preparing 3D keratin scaffold models which can be used to study the regeneration of tissue. (2020-04-14)
Turning cold tumors hot: Drug delivery system makes immunotherapy more effective
A new drug delivery system from PME researchers turns 'cold' tumors hot, letting the body's immune system attack hard-to-treat cancers. (2020-04-14)
Ultrasound solves an important clinical problem in diagnosing arrhythmia
Columbia Engineering researchers have used an ultrasound technique they pioneered a decade ago -- electromechanical wave imaging (EWI) -- to accurately localize atrial and ventricular cardiac arrhythmias in adult patients in a double-blinded clinical study. (2020-03-25)
How to get conductive gels to stick when wet
Researchers at MIT have come up with a way of getting conductive polymer gels to adhere to wet surfaces. (2020-03-20)
Biophysicists blend incompatible components in one nanofiber
Russian researchers showed the possibility of blending two incompatible components -- a protein and a polymer -- in one electrospun fiber. (2020-03-16)
Heat and light create new biocompatible microparticles
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised a new method for making biocompatible microparticles that uses little more than heat and light and allows them to create never-before-seen shapes for drug delivery, diagnostics and tissue engineering. (2020-03-12)
Muscle stem cells compiled in 'atlas'
A team of Cornell researchers led by Ben Cosgrove, assistant professor in the Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering, used a new cellular profiling technology to probe and catalog the activity of almost every kind of cell involved in muscle repair. (2020-03-10)
Nanoscale spectroscopy review showcases a bright future
A new review authored by international leaders in their field, and published in Nature, focuses on the luminescent nanoparticles at the heart of many advances and the opportunities and challenges for these technologies to reach their full potential. (2020-03-04)
Researchers identify breaking point of conducting material
An improved method to predict the temperature when plastics change from supple to brittle, which could potentially accelerate future development of flexible electronics, was developed by Penn State College of Engineering researchers. (2020-03-04)
App detecting jaundice may prevent deaths in newborns
A smartphone app that allows users to check for jaundice in newborn babies simply by taking a picture of the eye may be an effective, low-cost way to screen for the condition, according to a pilot study led by UCL and UCLH. (2020-03-02)
Handheld 3D printers developed to treat musculoskeletal injuries
Biomedical engineers at the UConn School of Dental Medicine recently developed a handheld 3D bioprinter that could revolutionize the way musculoskeletal surgical procedures are performed. (2020-02-27)
Stretchable, wearable coils may make MRI, other medical tests easier on patients
The Purdue team created an adaptable, wearable and stretchable fabric embroidered with conductive threads that provides excellent signal-to-noise ratio for enhanced MRI scanning. (2020-02-26)
Researchers show what drives a novel, ordered assembly of alternating peptides
A team of researchers has verified that it is possible to engineer two-layered nanofibers consisting of an ordered row of alternating peptides, and has also determined what makes these peptides automatically assemble into this pattern. (2020-02-20)
Finding new clues to brain cancer treatment
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Cleveland Clinic new discovered a more accurate way to determine the relative life expectancy of glioblastoma victims and identify who could be candidates for experimental clinical drug trials by blending information from Artificial Intelligence (AI)--in this case, computer image analysis of the initial MRI scans taken of brain cancer patients--and genomic research. (2020-02-20)
WWI helmets protect against shock waves just as well as modern designs
Biomedical engineers have demonstrated that, despite significant advancements in protection from ballistics and blunt impacts, modern military helmets are no better at protecting from shock waves than their World War I counterparts. (2020-02-14)
Mending a broken heart -- the bioengineering way
Bioengineers from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, have developed a prototype patch that does the same job as crucial aspects of heart tissue. (2020-02-13)
UConn biomedical engineer creates 'smart' bandages to heal chronic wounds
A new 'smart bandage' developed at UConn could help improve clinical care for people with chronic wounds. (2020-02-13)
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