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Current Biotechnology News and Events, Biotechnology News Articles.
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Telemedicine reduces mental health burden of COVID-19
Telemental health services are a practical and feasible way to support patients, family members, and healthcare providers who may experience psychological side-effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, including anxiety, fear, depression, and the impact of long-term isolation. (2020-03-24)
Implementing microbiome diagnostics in personalized medicine: Rise of pharmacomicrobiomics
A new Commentary identifies three actionable challenges for translating pharmacomicrobiomics to personalized medicine in 2020. (2020-03-02)
Bacterium makes complex loops
A scientific team from the Biosciences and Biotechnology Institute of Aix-Marseille in Saint-Paul lez Durance, in collaboration with researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam and the University of Göttingen, determined the trajectory and swimming speed of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus, known to move rapidly. (2020-02-27)
Stabilizing freeze-dried cellular machinery unlocks cell-free biotechnology
A low-cost approach improves cell-free biotechnology's utility for bio-manufacturing and portability for field applications. (2020-02-25)
Using social media to understand the vaccine debate in China
Vaccine acceptance is a crucial public health issue, which has been exacerbated by the use of social media to spread content expressing vaccine hesitancy. (2020-02-25)
Scientists develop enzyme produced from agricultural waste for use as laundry detergent
An international team of researchers has developed an enzyme produced from agricultural waste that could be used as an important additive in laundry detergents. (2020-02-25)
Researchers uncover two-drug combo that halts the growth of cancer cells
UT Southwestern Simmons Cancer Center researchers have discovered a two-drug combo that halts the growth of cancer cells that carry HER2 mutations. (2020-01-23)
New method to enable the production of cheaper, longer-lasting vaccines
A new method to produce vaccines that have a longer shelf-life, are cheaper and can be stored without the need for cooling is being presented in the open-access journal BMC Biotechnology. (2020-01-21)
Experimental therapy may offer hope for rare genetic disorders
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a new way to alleviate problems caused by dysfunctional mitochondria, which are the ''powerhouses'' that produce energy in cells (2020-01-13)
Artificial 'inclusion bodies' created for controlled drug release
A new study by the UAB, the CIBER-BBN, and the Hospital de Sant Pau describes the development of a new biomaterial with sustained drug release. (2019-12-19)
A machine learning approach to identify functional human phosphosites
Scientists have created the largest phosphoproteome resource to date, which is set to help other researchers identify new functionally-relevant phosphosites. (2019-12-11)
Safer viruses for vaccine research and diagnosis
A new technology to produce safer 'hybrid' viruses at high volumes for use in vaccines and diagnostics for mosquito-borne diseases has been developed at The University of Queensland. (2019-12-11)
Multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates
Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion - the ways animals move - and brain architecture, using high-definition 3D models of lizard and snake brains. (2019-12-05)
Squid pigments have antimicrobial properties
Ommochromes, the pigments that color the skin of squids and other invertebrates, could be used in the food and health sectors for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. (2019-12-05)
Insilico publishes a review of deep aging clocks and announces the issuance of key patent
Insilico Medicine announced the publication of a comprehensive review of the deep biomarkers of aging and the publication of a granted patent titled 'Deep transcriptomic markers of human biological aging and methods of determining a biological aging clock.' (2019-12-05)
Recycling nutrient-rich industrial waste products enhances soil, reduces carbon
Recycling biotechnology byproducts can enhance soil health while reducing carbon emissions and maintaining crop yields. (2019-12-05)
Study shows link between precipitation, climate zone and invasive cancer rates in the US
In a new study, researchers provide conclusive evidence of a statistical relationship between the incidence rates of invasive cancer in a given area in the US and the amount of precipitation and climate type (which combines the temperature and moisture level in an area). (2019-12-02)
Key to rubustness of plants discovered
The Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology (acib) and Technical University of Graz decoded the mechanism of Adipose-Biosynthesis - the basis for the production of sugar molecules for neu fine chemicals or biopharmaceuticals. (2019-11-26)
A new antibiotic to combat drug-resistant bacteria is in sight
An international team of researchers, with the participation of Giessen University and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), discovered a new active substance effective against gram negative bacteria that targets a previously unknown site of action: 'Darobactin'. (2019-11-21)
Light at the end of the nanotunnel for future catalysts
Using a new type of nanoreactor, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in mapping catalytic reactions on individual metallic nanoparticles. (2019-11-13)
Minimizing post-harvest food losses
Research team from Graz, Austria, develops biological methods to improve the shelf life of fruit and vegetables. (2019-11-07)
'Big data' for life sciences
Scientists have produced a co-regulation map of the human proteome, which was able to capture relationships between proteins that do not physically interact or co-localize. (2019-11-05)
New method for quicker and simpler production of lipidated proteins
The new method developed at TU Graz and the University of Vienna is leading to a better understanding of natural protein modifications and improved protein therapeutics. (2019-10-15)
Stanford-made exhibit plunges people in the world of microbes
Scientists at Stanford and the Exploratorium developed an immersive exhibit where visitors can dance with living cells. (2019-10-02)
Can a donor voucher program broaden representation in local campaign financing?
A new study investigated the effectiveness of Seattle, WA's Democracy Voucher program in expanding participation from marginalized communities in a local election, where voters were each given four, twenty-five-dollar vouchers to assign to the local candidates of their choice. (2019-10-01)
Using unconventional materials, like ice and eggshells, as scaffolds to grow tissues
In a review publishing Sept. 18, 2019 in the journal Trends in Biotechnology, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Lowell explore recent efforts to use everyday materials like ice, paper, and spinach as tissue scaffolds. (2019-09-18)
Why transporters really matter for cell factories
Scientists discover the secret behind some protein transporters' superiority. One transporter, MAE1, can export organic acids out of yeast spending close-to-zero energy. (2019-09-04)
New method of tooth repair? Scientists uncover mechanisms that could help dental treatment
Stem cells hold the key for tissue engineering, as they develop into specialised cell types throughout the body including in teeth. (2019-08-09)
Is Instagram behavior motivated by a desire to belong?
Does a desire to belong and perceived social support drive a person's frequency of Instagram use? (2019-07-23)
Next generation metagenomics: Exploring the opportunities and challenges
A new expert review highlights the opportunities and methodological challenges at this critical juncture in the growth of the field of metagenomics. (2019-07-15)
Research team deciphers enzymatic degradation of sugar from marine alga
Enzymes are biocatalysts that are crucial for the degradation of seaweed biomass in oceans. (2019-07-08)
The 'AI turn' for digital health: A futuristic view
The unprecedented implications of digital health innovations, being co-produced by the mainstreaming and integration of artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), and cyber-physical systems (CPS) in healthcare, are examined in a new technology horizon-scanning article. (2019-06-12)
Using tumor biomarkers to tailor therapy in metastatic pancreatic cancer
A new pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of using molecular tumor markers as the basis for selecting the chemotherapeutic agents to use in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. (2019-06-10)
Is a broadly effective dengue vaccine even possible?
Dengue is on the rise, with about 20,000 patients dying each year from this mosquito-borne disease, yet despite ongoing efforts a broadly effective dengue vaccine is not available. (2019-05-14)
Early term infants less likely to breastfeed
A new, prospective study provides evidence that 'early term' infants (those born at 37-38 weeks) are less likely than full-term infants to be breastfeed within the first hour and at one month after birth. (2019-05-14)
Researchers discover 'daywake,' a siesta-suppressing gene
Rutgers researchers have identified a siesta-suppressing gene in fruit flies, which sheds light on the biology that helps many creatures, including humans, balance the benefits of a good nap against those of getting important activities done during the day. (2019-05-09)
Scientists discover how superbugs hide from their host
New research led by the University of Sheffield has discovered how a hospital superbug evades the immune system to cause infection -- paving the way for new treatments. (2019-05-02)
Bacteria uses viral weapon against other bacteria
Bacterial cells use both a virus -- traditionally thought to be an enemy -- and a prehistoric viral protein to kill other bacteria that competes with it for food according to an international team of researchers who believe this has potential implications for future infectious disease treatment. (2019-04-25)
When is sexting associated with psychological distress among young adults?
While sending or receiving nude electronic images may not always be associated with poorer mental health, being coerced to do so and receiving unwanted sexts was linked to a higher likelihood of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. (2019-04-23)
Novel biomarkers for noninvasive diagnosis of NAFLD-related fibrosis
With an estimated 25% of people worldwide affected by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), there is a large unmet need for accurate, noninvasive measures to enhance early diagnosis and screening of hepatic fibrosis. (2019-04-16)
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