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Current Biotechnology News and Events

Current Biotechnology News and Events, Biotechnology News Articles.
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New method for quicker and simpler production of lipidated proteins
The new method developed at TU Graz and the University of Vienna is leading to a better understanding of natural protein modifications and improved protein therapeutics. (2019-10-15)
Stanford-made exhibit plunges people in the world of microbes
Scientists at Stanford and the Exploratorium developed an immersive exhibit where visitors can dance with living cells. (2019-10-02)
Can a donor voucher program broaden representation in local campaign financing?
A new study investigated the effectiveness of Seattle, WA's Democracy Voucher program in expanding participation from marginalized communities in a local election, where voters were each given four, twenty-five-dollar vouchers to assign to the local candidates of their choice. (2019-10-01)
Using unconventional materials, like ice and eggshells, as scaffolds to grow tissues
In a review publishing Sept. 18, 2019 in the journal Trends in Biotechnology, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Lowell explore recent efforts to use everyday materials like ice, paper, and spinach as tissue scaffolds. (2019-09-18)
Why transporters really matter for cell factories
Scientists discover the secret behind some protein transporters' superiority. One transporter, MAE1, can export organic acids out of yeast spending close-to-zero energy. (2019-09-04)
New method of tooth repair? Scientists uncover mechanisms that could help dental treatment
Stem cells hold the key for tissue engineering, as they develop into specialised cell types throughout the body including in teeth. (2019-08-09)
Is Instagram behavior motivated by a desire to belong?
Does a desire to belong and perceived social support drive a person's frequency of Instagram use? (2019-07-23)
Next generation metagenomics: Exploring the opportunities and challenges
A new expert review highlights the opportunities and methodological challenges at this critical juncture in the growth of the field of metagenomics. (2019-07-15)
Research team deciphers enzymatic degradation of sugar from marine alga
Enzymes are biocatalysts that are crucial for the degradation of seaweed biomass in oceans. (2019-07-08)
The 'AI turn' for digital health: A futuristic view
The unprecedented implications of digital health innovations, being co-produced by the mainstreaming and integration of artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), and cyber-physical systems (CPS) in healthcare, are examined in a new technology horizon-scanning article. (2019-06-12)
Using tumor biomarkers to tailor therapy in metastatic pancreatic cancer
A new pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of using molecular tumor markers as the basis for selecting the chemotherapeutic agents to use in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. (2019-06-10)
Is a broadly effective dengue vaccine even possible?
Dengue is on the rise, with about 20,000 patients dying each year from this mosquito-borne disease, yet despite ongoing efforts a broadly effective dengue vaccine is not available. (2019-05-14)
Early term infants less likely to breastfeed
A new, prospective study provides evidence that 'early term' infants (those born at 37-38 weeks) are less likely than full-term infants to be breastfeed within the first hour and at one month after birth. (2019-05-14)
Researchers discover 'daywake,' a siesta-suppressing gene
Rutgers researchers have identified a siesta-suppressing gene in fruit flies, which sheds light on the biology that helps many creatures, including humans, balance the benefits of a good nap against those of getting important activities done during the day. (2019-05-09)
Scientists discover how superbugs hide from their host
New research led by the University of Sheffield has discovered how a hospital superbug evades the immune system to cause infection -- paving the way for new treatments. (2019-05-02)
Bacteria uses viral weapon against other bacteria
Bacterial cells use both a virus -- traditionally thought to be an enemy -- and a prehistoric viral protein to kill other bacteria that competes with it for food according to an international team of researchers who believe this has potential implications for future infectious disease treatment. (2019-04-25)
When is sexting associated with psychological distress among young adults?
While sending or receiving nude electronic images may not always be associated with poorer mental health, being coerced to do so and receiving unwanted sexts was linked to a higher likelihood of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. (2019-04-23)
Novel biomarkers for noninvasive diagnosis of NAFLD-related fibrosis
With an estimated 25% of people worldwide affected by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), there is a large unmet need for accurate, noninvasive measures to enhance early diagnosis and screening of hepatic fibrosis. (2019-04-16)
Excessive hygiene promotes resistance to antibiotics
In Nature Communications, researchers from Graz in Austria present initial approaches to how the spread of antibiotic resistances can be prevented in hospitals. (2019-03-12)
Checking DNA base editor's mistakes and tricks to reduce them
IBS scientists have identified the mistake-rate of DNA editing tools, based on CRISPR and known as adenine base editors. (2019-03-04)
Bringing more human intelligence to AI, data science and digital automation
The advent of data science, wireless connectivity and sensors, artificial intelligence, and the Internet of Things has raised the prospects for digital automation, smart hospital design and the home health care industry for an aging population. (2019-03-04)
Preventing the production of toxic mitochondrial proteins -- a promising treatment target
Researchers at the University of Helsinki uncovered the mechanisms for a novel cellular stress response arising from the toxicity of newly synthesized proteins. (2019-02-21)
Hens that lay human proteins in eggs offer future therapy hope
Chickens that are genetically modified to produce human proteins in their eggs can offer a cost-effective method of producing certain types of drugs, research from the University of Edinburgh suggests. (2019-01-27)
Long-read DNA analysis can give rise to errors, experts warn
Advanced technologies that read long strings of DNA can produce flawed data that could affect genetic studies, research from the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute suggests. (2019-01-22)
UM professor co-authors report on the use of biotechnology in forests
University of Montana Professor Diana Six is one of 12 authors of a new report that addresses the potential for biotechnology to provide solutions for protecting forest trees from insect and pathogen outbreaks, which are increasing because of climate change and expanded global trade. (2019-01-15)
Hair colour gene study sheds new light on roots of redheads' locks
Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have discovered eight additional genes linked to red hair, helping to solve a mystery of how redheads inherit their flaming locks. (2018-12-10)
Plants as antifungal factories
Researchers from three research institutes in Spain have developed a biotechnological tool to produce, in a very efficient manner, antifungal proteins in the leaves of the plant Nicotiana benthamiana. (2018-12-10)
A bastard seal from the past reveals the potential for human hybrids
If discovered as fossils, grey and ringed seals are so different that they could be classified as belonging to different families. (2018-11-30)
Ben-Gurion University research leads to first nationwide sunscreen chemicals ban in Palau
'We are pleased to see that governments are using scientific research conducted at Ben-Gurion University to protect the delicate coral reef systems and ocean wildlife that are already under significant stress from climate change,' says Prof. (2018-11-07)
SibFU scientists simulated the intracellular environment of a luminescent bacteria cell
A team from the Institute of Fundamental Biology and Biotechnology of SFU used glycerol and sucrose to simulate the intracellular environment of luminescent bacteria and carried out a number of enzymatic reactions in it. (2018-10-26)
Science/Science Careers' survey ranks top biotech, biopharma, and pharma employers
The Science and Science Careers' 2018 annual Top Employers Survey polled employees in the biotechnology, biopharmaceutical, pharmaceutical, and related industries to determine the 20 best employers in these industries as well as their driving characteristics. (2018-10-25)
How are pulsed electric fields being used in cancer therapy?
Pulsed electric fields are helping fight cancer, whether by inducing tumor cell death or by stimulating the immune system. (2018-10-11)
Blue roses could be coming soon to a garden near you
For centuries, gardeners have attempted to breed blue roses with no success. (2018-10-10)
More bad news for artificial sweetener users according to Ben-Gurion University researchers
The collaborative study indicated relative toxicity of six artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sucralose, saccharine, neotame, advantame, and acesulfame potassium-k) and 10 sport supplements containing these artificial sweeteners. (2018-10-01)
New immunotherapy inhibits tumor growth and protects against metastases
Scientists at the VIB-UGent Center for Medical Biotechnology have taken important steps forward in the development of a cancer-targeting immunotherapy. (2018-08-24)
Most Americans accept genetic engineering of animals that benefits human health
Americans' views of possible uses of genetic engineering in animals vary depending on the mechanism and intended purpose of the technology, particularly the extent to which it would bring health benefits to humans. (2018-08-16)
Groundbreaking poplar study shows trees can be genetically engineered not to spread
The largest field-based study of genetically modified forest trees ever conducted has demonstrated that genetic engineering can prevent new seedlings from establishing. (2018-08-03)
Yeast species used in food industry causes disease in humans
A major cause of drug-resistant clinical yeast infections is the same species previously regarded as non-pathogenic and commonly used in the biotechnology and food industries. (2018-07-19)
What's in an egg? Oocyte factors that can reprogram adult cells
The promise of generating truly pluripotent stem cells from terminally differentiated adult cell types continues to captivate scientists who envision great potential for therapeutic interventions. (2018-07-03)
Finnish scientists analyzed the proteome of T helper 17 cells
T helper 17 (Th17) cells belong to a group of T cells with essential functions in autoimmune diseases and inflammation. (2018-06-20)
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