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Current Bird species News and Events, Bird species News Articles.
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Bird and reptile tears aren't so different from human tears
Vision is essential for the survival of most animal species and tears provide potentially life-saving protection for the eyes. (2020-08-13)
Snowshoe hare carcasses feed more then the usual suspects, study shows
What do lynx, flying squirrels, ravens, and wolverines have in common? (2020-08-13)
Researchers assemble first comprehensive list of Panama's trees with geographic ranges
In a new research paper published in Forest Ecosystems, The Morton Arboretum Center for Tree Science Research Fellow Richard Condit, PhD, provided the first comprehensive checklist of Panama's trees to include geographic ranges by using an innovative, repeatable method for assessing extinction risk of trees in poorly studied areas. (2020-08-13)
Emerging infectious disease and challenges of social distancing in human and non-human animals
Humans are not the only social animal struggling with new infectious diseases. (2020-08-12)
Some dinosaurs could fly before they were birds
New research using the most comprehensive study of feathered dinosaurs and early birds has revised the evolutionary relationships of dinosaurs at the origin of birds. (2020-08-12)
Primate voice boxes are evolving at rapid pace
Scientists have discovered that the larynx, or voice box, of primates is significantly larger relative to body size, has greater variation, and is under faster rates of evolution than in other mammals. (2020-08-11)
How fish stocks will change in warming seas
New research out today highlights the future effects of climate change on important fish stocks for south-west UK fisheries. (2020-08-10)
Multi-species bacterial communities bounce back from environmental disturbances
Perturbations in the environment are common, and communities consisting of several species seem to find their way around the crisis. (2020-08-10)
Adaptive mutations repeat themselves in tiny crustaceans of Lake Baikal
Researchers showed that parallel evolution driven by adaptations can be detected at the whole-genome level. (2020-08-10)
How boundaries become bridges in evolution
The mechanisms that make organisms locally fit and those responsible for change are distinct and occur sequentially in evolution. (2020-08-10)
Most close relatives of birds neared the potential for powered flight but few crossed its thresholds
An international study led by HKU Research Assistant Professor Dr. (2020-08-10)
The Last unknown
New research reveals that New Guinea is the world's richest island for plants. (2020-08-07)
Updating Turing's model of pattern formation
Research published in EPJ B revisits the Turing instability mechanism; proving mathematically how the instabilities which give rise to patterns can occur through simple reactions, and in widely varied environmental conditions. (2020-08-07)
Long neck helped reptile hunt underwater
Its neck was three times as long as its torso, but had only 13 extremely elongated vertebrae: Tanystropheus, a bizarre giraffe-necked reptile which lived 242 million years ago, is a paleontological absurdity. (2020-08-06)
Bird nests attract flying insects and parasites due to higher levels of carbon dioxide
Researchers in Spain have examined bird nests in order to understand how flying insects and parasites detect gases as a way to locate their hosts. (2020-08-05)
Are vultures spreaders of microbes that put human health at risk?
A new analysis published in IBIS examines whether bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present in wild vultures cause disease in the birds, and whether vultures play a role in spreading or preventing infectious diseases to humans and other animal species. (2020-08-05)
New Guinea has the world's richest island flora
New Guinea is the most floristically diverse island in the world, an international collaboration led by the University of Zurich has shown. (2020-08-05)
Land use changes may increase disease outbreak risks
Global changes in land use are disrupting the balance of wild animal communities in our environment, and species that carry diseases known to infect humans appear to be benefiting, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature. (2020-08-05)
Herbivorous vertebrates may face most daunting extinction risk
Herbivores -- not predators -- may face a higher risk of extinction among mammals, birds, and reptiles, according to a new study of more than 44,000 living and extinct species. (2020-08-05)
A 40-year journey leads to a new truffle species
Forty years after Dan Luoma found an unsual truffle collection, scientists confirmed it is a new species and named it after Luoma.  (2020-08-04)
Between shark and ray: The evolutionary advantage of the sea angels
Angel sharks are sharks, but with their peculiarly flat body they rather resemble rays. (2020-08-04)
Angels in disguise: Angelfishes hybridize more than any other coral reef species
A new study highlights the remarkably high incidence of and tendency toward hybridisation in the angelfish family (even between divergent species), more so than in any other group of coral reef fishes. (2020-08-04)
New species of fungus sticking out of beetles named after the COVID-19 quarantine
A comprehensive study on a group of unique ectoparasitic fungi associated with insects and other arthropods in Belgium and the Netherlands was published in the open-access, peer-reviewed scholarly journal MycoKeys. (2020-08-03)
An insect species can actively escape from the vents of predators via the digestive system
Some prey species can escape from inside a predator after a successful attack. (2020-08-03)
Study: Oriole hybridization is a dead end
A half-century of controversy over two popular bird species may have finally come to an end. (2020-08-03)
New studies show how to save parasites and why it's important
An international group of scientists published a paper, Aug. 1, 2020, in a special edition of the journal Biological Conservation that lays out an ambitious global conservation plan for parasites. (2020-08-01)
DNA metabarcoding detects ecological stress within freshwater species
Metabarcoding allows scientists to extract DNA from the environment, in order to rapidly detect species inhabiting a particular habitat. (2020-07-31)
Insights on the gut microbiome could shape more powerful, precise treatment
In a recently published study, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital explore how the dynamics of bacterial species may influence the success of fecal microbiota transplantation in treating recurrent C. difficile infection. (2020-07-31)
Loss of adaptive immunity helps deep sea anglerfish fuse with their mates
The discovery of altered adaptive immunity in anglerfish helps explain how the creatures are able to temporarily or permanently fuse with their mates without experiencing immune rejection. (2020-07-30)
Curtin research finds first African carder bees to reach Western Australia
Curtin research has recorded the first known appearance of Pseudoanthidium (Immanthidium) repetitum, the African carder bee, in Western Australia and has highlighted the need to closely monitor the impacts of such introduced species on the ecosystem. (2020-07-29)
Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity
Biodiversity's ongoing global decline has prompted policies to protect and restore habitats to minimize animal and plant extinctions. (2020-07-29)
Sea slugs: discovering other inhabitants in the Barcelona coasts
A study on marine biodiversity has identified seventy-three species of sea slugs in the coasts of Barcelona, an anthropized environment due to the urban metropolis. (2020-07-29)
Owl discovered that hunted like a hawk 55 million years ago
Paleontologists have described in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology a large owl that killed medium-sized mammals with its feet and claws some 55 million years ago. (2020-07-29)
Study sheds light on the evolution of the earliest dinosaurs
Geological evidence suggests the known dinosaur groups diverged early on, supporting the traditional dinosaur family tree. (2020-07-29)
Madagascar: New mouse lemur species discovered
Group of researchers, from six countries, identified, genetically and morphologically, a new population of rats (Microcebus) that inhabit the same forests as another usual species previously described. (2020-07-28)
For rufous hummingbirds, migration looks different depending on age and sex
Plucky, beautiful and declining in numbers at about a 2% annual rate, the rufous hummingbird makes its long annual migration in different timing and route patterns based the birds' age and sex, new research by Oregon State University shows. (2020-07-28)
Scientists prove bird ovary tissue can be preserved in fossils
A research team led by Dr. Alida Bailleul from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has proved that remnants of bird ovaries can be preserved in the fossil record. (2020-07-28)
Researchers build first AI tool capable of identifying individual birds
New research demonstrates for the first time that artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to train computers to recognise individual birds, a task humans are unable to do. (2020-07-27)
Artificial Intelligence to identify individual birds of a same species
Humans have a hard time identifying individual birds just by looking at the patterns on their plumage. (2020-07-27)
Cycad plants provide an important 'ecosystem service'
A study published in the June 2020 edition of the peer-reviewed journal Horticulturae shows that cycads, which are in decline and among the world's most threatened group of plants, provide an important service to their neighboring organisms. (2020-07-26)
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