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Current Bird News and Events, Bird News Articles.
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Twenty-year study tracks a sparrow song that went "viral" across Canada
With the help of citizen scientists, researchers have tracked how one rare sparrow song went ''viral'' across Canada, traveling over 3,000 kilometers between 2000 and 2019 and wiping out a historic song ending. (2020-07-02)
No leg to stand on for Australia's flamingos
The sweeping pink salt lakes across Australia's interior are all that remain of the lush green places three species of pink flamingos once thrived the outback. (2020-06-26)
Mountain meadow restoration can bring birds back
In a new study led by scientists at Point Blue Conservation Science and in collaboration with The Institute for Bird Populations, authors evaluated the successes of mountain meadow restorations by analyzing eight years of bird data collected by field biologists. (2020-06-25)
OSU research suggests a better way to keep birds from hitting power lines
Suspended, rotating devices known as ''flappers'' may be the key to fewer birds flying into power lines, a new study suggests. (2020-06-24)
Wind beneath their wings: Albatrosses fine-tuned to wind conditions
A new study of albatrosses has found that wind plays a bigger role in their decision to take flight than previously thought, and due to their differences in body size, males and females differ in their response to wind. (2020-06-19)
Wildfires cause bird songs to change
A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that wildfires change the types of songs sung by birds living in nearby forests. (2020-06-16)
Bird feeding helps females more than males
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that female birds benefit more from extra food in the winter. (2020-06-12)
Roadkill study identifies animals most at risk in Europe
New method used to predict how many birds and mammals are being killed on European roads, as well as identifying species whose long-term survival is threatened by roads. (2020-06-10)
Mysterious Australian Night Parrots may not see in the dead of night
Australia's most elusive bird, the Night Parrot, may not be much better at seeing in the dark than other parrots active during the day. (2020-06-09)
Warming climate is changing where birds breed
Spring is in full swing. Trees are leafing out, flowers are blooming, bees are buzzing, and birds are singing. (2020-05-26)
What information is coded in bird alarm calls -- a new study from Korea
Recordings of the Oriental tit's alarm responses showed that alarm calls to snakes have special acoustic properties different from calls to chipmunks, even though both predators can enter bird's nests and destroy broods. (2020-05-25)
How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
New research from Kyoto University show that the coal tit (Periparus ater) can eavesdrop and react to the predatory warning calls of the Japanese tit (Parus minor) and evokes a visual image of the predator in their mind (2020-05-19)
Lack of insects in cities limits breeding success of urban birds
Urban insect populations would need to increase by a factor of at least 2.5 for urban great tits to have same breeding success as those living in forests according to research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Animal Ecology. (2020-05-18)
Analysis of bird species reveals how wings adapted to their environment and behavior
Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behavior, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements, led by the University of Bristol. (2020-05-18)
Early Bird uses 10 times less energy to train deep neural networks
Rice engineers have found a way to train deep neural networks for a fraction of the energy required today. (2020-05-18)
Scientists discover why some birds live fast and die young
Size, safety and parenting all have an impact on how quickly a species of bird matures, according to new research from the University of Sheffield that could help scientists to understand and predict how animals will respond to climate breakdown and the destruction of habitats. (2020-05-14)
Microscopic feather features reveal fossil birds' colors and explain why cassowaries shine
Some birds are iridescent because of the physical make-up of their feathers, but scientists had never found evidence of this structural color in the group of birds containing ostriches and cassowaries -- until now. (2020-05-13)
Early experiences determine how birds build their first nest
Early life experiences of zebra finches have a big effect on the construction of their first homes, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Science and the University of St. (2020-05-12)
Birds take flight with help from Sonic hedgehog
Flight feathers are amazing evolutionary innovations that allowed birds to conquer the sky. (2020-05-06)
Arctic wildlife uses extreme method to save energy
The extreme cold, harsh environment and constant hunt for food means that Arctic animals have become specialists in saving energy. (2020-04-28)
Plastic pollution reaching the Antarctic
Food wrapping, fishing gear and plastic waste continue to reach the Antarctic. (2020-04-28)
How birds evolved big brains
An international team of evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the great auk, and modern birds. (2020-04-23)
Hummingbirds show up when tropical trees fall down
When the tree fell that October in 2015, the tropical giant didn't go down alone. (2020-04-23)
Revealed: the secret life of godwits
To find out more about birds such as the black-tailed godwit, ecologists have been conducting long-term population studies using standardized information on reproductive behaviour--such as dates of egg-laying or hatching and levels of chick survival. (2020-04-20)
Spider venom key to pain relief without side-effects
Molecules in tarantula venom could be used as an alternative to opioid pain killers for people seeking chronic pain relief. (2020-04-13)
Black rhinos eavesdrop on the alarm calls of hitchhiking oxpeckers to avoid humans
In Swahili, red-billed oxpeckers are called Askari wa kifaru, or 'the rhino's guard.' Now, a paper appearing April 9 in the journal Current Biology suggests that this indigenous name rings true: red-billed oxpeckers may behave like sentinels, sounding an alarm to potential danger. (2020-04-09)
How does habitat fragmentation affect Amazonian birds?
The Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project (BDFFP), located near Manaus, Brazil, began in 1979 and is the world's longest-running experimental study of tropical forest fragments. (2020-04-08)
Researchers assess bird flu virus subtypes in China
The avian influenza virus subtype H16N3 is currently detectable in many countries. (2020-04-08)
Innovative birds are less vulnerable to extinction
Bird species that have the capacity to express novel foraging behaviors are less vulnerable to extinction than species that do not, according to a collaborative study involving McGill University and CREAF Barcelona and published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-04-06)
Climate change may be making migration harder by shortening nightingales' wings
The Common Nightingale, known for its beautiful song, breeds in Europe and parts of Asia and migrates to sub-Saharan Africa every winter. (2020-04-01)
Surprising hearing talents in cormorants
The great cormorant has more sensitive hearing under water than in air. (2020-04-01)
Prehistoric artifacts suggest a Neolithic era independently developed in New Guinea
New artifacts uncovered at the Waim archaeological site in the highlands of New Guinea -- including a fragment of the earliest symbolic stone carving in Oceania -- illustrate a shift in human behavior between 5,050 and 4,200 years ago in response to the widespread emergence of agriculture, ushering in a regional Neolithic Era similar to the Neolithic in Eurasia. (2020-04-01)
Six million-year-old bird skeleton points to arid past of Tibetan plateau
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found a new species of sandgrouse in six to nine million-year-old rocks in Gansu Province in western China. (2020-04-01)
When warblers warn of cowbirds, blackbirds get the message
This is the story of three bird species and how they interact. (2020-03-31)
Microelectronics for birds
Ornithologists and physicists from St Petersburg University have conducted an interdisciplinary study together with colleagues from Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Biological Station Rybachy of the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. (2020-03-30)
Big brains or many babies: How birds can thrive in urban environments
Having bigger brains isn't the only strategy for success for birds adapting to urban habitats. (2020-03-25)
Prehistoric artifacts suggest a neolithic era independently developed in New Guinea
New artifacts uncovered at the Waim archaeological site in the highlands of New Guinea -- including a fragment of the earliest symbolic stone carving in Oceania -- illustrate a shift in human behavior between 5,050 and 4,200 years ago in response to the widespread emergence of agriculture, ushering in a regional Neolithic Era similar to the Neolithic in Eurasia. (2020-03-25)
Research shows most bird feed contains troublesome weed seeds
Many millions of homeowners use feeders to attract birds. But a two-year study featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management suggests there may be one unintended consequence to this popular hobby. (2020-03-20)
'Wonderchicken' fossil from the age of dinosaurs reveals origin of modern birds
The oldest fossil of a modern bird yet found, dating from the age of dinosaurs, has been identified by an international team of palaeontologists. (2020-03-18)
Crop diversity can buffer the effects of climate change
Stanford researchers found that farms with diverse crops planted together provide more secure, stable habitats for wildlife and are more resilient to climate change than the single-crop standard that dominates today's agriculture industry. (2020-03-18)
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