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Current Birds News and Events, Birds News Articles.
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Biologist leads pioneering study on stress
A biologist at Louisiana State University conducted a pioneering research study that could help us to better understand the role of dopamine in stress resilience in humans through analyzing wild songbirds. (2019-07-19)
How puffins catch food outside the breeding season
Little is known about how seabirds catch their food outside the breeding season but using modern technology, researchers at the University of Liverpool and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology have gained new insight into their feeding habits. (2019-07-17)
Birds of a feather flock together to keep their options open, say scientists
Why did you choose your job? Or where you live? (2019-07-16)
Long live the long-limbed African chicken
For generations, household farmers in the Horn of Africa have selectively chosen chickens with certain traits that make them more appealing. (2019-07-16)
Avian malaria behind drastic decline of London's iconic sparrow?
London's house sparrows (Passer domesticus) have plummeted by 71% since 1995, with new research suggesting avian malaria could be to blame. (2019-07-16)
More farmers, more problems: How smallholder agriculture is threatening the western Amazon
Small-scale farmers are posing serious threats to biodiversity in northeastern Peru -- and the problem will likely only get worse. (2019-07-15)
Bird with unusually long toes found fossilized in amber
Meet the ancient bird that had toes longer than its lower legs. (2019-07-11)
New species of lizard found in stomach of microraptor
A team of paleontologists led by Professor Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with researchers from the Shandong Tianyu Museum of Nature, have discovered a new specimen of the volant dromaeosaurid Microraptor zhaoianus with the remains of a nearly complete lizard preserved in its stomach. (2019-07-11)
Lovebirds ace maneuvers in the dark
In order to navigate extreme crosswinds in the dark, lovebirds only need a single point of light. (2019-07-09)
Unlocking secrets of the ice worm
WSU researchers have identified an ice worm on Vancouver Island that is closely related to ice worms 1,200 miles away in southern Alaska. (2019-06-26)
The case of the poisoned songbirds
Researchers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Wildlife Investigations Laboratory present their results from a toxicological investigation into a mortality event involving songbirds in a new publication in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. (2019-06-26)
Former war refugee maps habitat for West African bird
Former war refugee Benedictus Freeman is lead author of a new paper in the peer-reviewed journal Avian Research that projects the geographic distribution of the bird through 2050. (2019-06-26)
Pine woodland restoration creates haven for birds in Midwest, MU study finds
Researchers from the University of Missouri have shown in a new study that restoration of pine woodlands, through the combined use of intentional, managed fires and strategic thinning of tree density, has a strikingly beneficial effect on a diverse array of birds, some of which are facing sharp declines from human-driven impacts like climate change and habitat loss. (2019-06-25)
Blue color tones in fossilized prehistoric feathers
Examining fossilized pigments, scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered new insights into blue color tones in prehistoric birds. (2019-06-25)
Additions, deletions, & changes to the official list of North American birds
The latest supplement to the American Ornithological Society's checklist of North and Middle American birds is being published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, and it includes several major updates to the organization of the continent's bird species. (2019-06-24)
Parental care has forced great crested grebes to lay eggs with an eye on seagulls
Ornithologists from St Petersburg University, Elmira Zaynagutdinova and Yuriy Mikhailov, studied the features of the great crested grebes (Podiceps cristatus) nesting in the nature reserve 'North Coast of the Neva Bay'. (2019-06-21)
Spiders risk everything for love
A biology study finds that blue jays can easily spot wolf spiders engaged in their courtship rituals. (2019-06-20)
Study reveals key locations for declining songbird
Many of North America's migratory songbirds are declining at alarming rates. (2019-06-19)
Research shows wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat
We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent seabirds from accessing the most important of habitats: their nests. (2019-06-19)
A songbird's fate hinges on one fragile area
Researchers were surprised to find that a migratory songbird that breeds in the eastern and central United States is concentrated during winter in just one South American country. (2019-06-19)
Successful 'alien' bird invasions are location dependent
Whether 'alien' bird species thrive in a new habitat depends more on the environmental conditions than the population size or characteristics of the invading bird species, finds a new UCL-led study. (2019-06-19)
Monitoring biodiversity with sound: How machines can enrich our knowledge
For a long time, ecologists have relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. (2019-06-18)
The fellowship of the wing: Pigeons flap faster to fly together
New research publishing June 18 in the open-access journal, PLOS Biology, led by Dr. (2019-06-18)
Baby pterodactyls could fly from birth
A breakthrough discovery has found that pterodactyls, extinct flying reptiles also known as pterosaurs, had a remarkable ability -- they could fly from birth. (2019-06-12)
The brains of birds synchronize when they sing duets
Vocal control areas in the brain of weaver birds fire in time when they sing together. (2019-06-12)
Fracking causes some songbirds to thrive while others decline
A paper soon to appear in The Condor: Ornithological Applications, published by Oxford University Press, finds that some songbird species benefit from the spread of fracking infrastructure while others suffer. (2019-06-11)
Love songs from paradise take a nosedive
The Galápagos Islands finches named after Charles Darwin are starting to sing a different tune because of an introduced pest on the once pristine environment. (2019-06-11)
Past climate change pushed birds from the northern hemisphere to the tropics
Researchers have shown how millions of years of climate change affected the range and habitat of modern birds, suggesting that many groups of tropical birds may be relatively recent arrivals in their equatorial homes. (2019-06-10)
Bird personalities influenced by both age and experience, study shows
For birds, differences in personality are a function of both age and experience, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-06-06)
Working landscapes can support diverse bird species
Privately-owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (2019-06-05)
Gene-edited chicken cells resist bird flu virus in the lab
Scientists have used gene-editing techniques to stop the bird flu virus from spreading in chicken cells grown in the lab. (2019-06-04)
New research explores the mechanics of how birds flock
Wildlife researchers have long tried to understand why birds fly in flocks and how different types of flocks work. (2019-06-04)
Pathogens may have facilitated the evolution of warm-blooded animals
Animals first developed fever as a response to infections: the higher body temperatures primed their immune systems. (2019-06-04)
Feathers came first, then birds
New research, led by the University of Bristol, suggests that feathers arose 100 million years before birds -- changing how we look at dinosaurs, birds, and pterosaurs, the flying reptiles. (2019-06-03)
Some songbird nests are especially vulnerable to magpie predation
A new study has revealed a range of factors that cause a variation in predation by magpies on farmland songbirds. (2019-05-29)
Mass die-off of puffins recorded in the Bering Sea
A mass die-off of seabirds in the Bering Sea may be partially attributable to climate change, according to a new study publishing May 29 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Timothy Jones of the citizen science program COASST at University of Washington, Lauren Divine from the Aleut Community of St. (2019-05-29)
Birds perceive 'warm' colors differently from 'cool' ones
Birds may not have a word for maroon. Or burnt sienna. (2019-05-29)
Study predicts shift to smaller animals over next century
Researchers at the University of Southampton have forecast a worldwide move towards smaller birds and mammals over the next 100 years. (2019-05-23)
Gas vs. electric? Fuel choice affects efforts to achieve low-energy and low-impact homes
If you want to make your home as energy-efficient and green as possible, should you use gas or electric for your heating and cooling needs? (2019-05-23)
Baby tiger sharks eat songbirds
Tiger sharks have a reputation for being the 'garbage cans of the sea' -- they'll eat just about anything, from dolphins and sea turtles to rubber tires. (2019-05-21)
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