Nav: Home

Current Birds News and Events

Current Birds News and Events, Birds News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Newly discovered virus infects bald eagles across America
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown virus infecting nearly a third of America's bald eagle population. (2019-10-18)
Wind turbine design and placement can mitigate negative effect on birds
Wind energy is increasingly seen as a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, as it contributes to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. (2019-10-18)
First scientific description of elusive bird illuminates plight of Borneo's forests
Scientists with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and collaborators surveying the birdlife of Borneo have discovered a startling surprise: an undescribed species of bird, which has been named the spectacled flowerpecker. (2019-10-17)
The moon determines when migratory birds head south
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that the presence or absence of moonlight has a considerable bearing on when migratory birds take flight in the autumn. (2019-10-16)
Warmer nights prompt forest birds to lay eggs earlier in spring
Rising night-time temperatures are causing woodland birds to build nests and lay eggs earlier in springtime, research shows. (2019-10-16)
Study helps pinpoint what makes species vulnerable to environmental change
Researchers from Princeton University affiliated with PEI reported that a bird species' ability to adapt to seasonal temperature changes may be one factor in whether it can better withstand environmental disruption. (2019-10-16)
Rare 'itinerant breeding' behavior revealed in California bird
Only two bird species have ever been shown to undertake what scientists call 'itinerant breeding': nesting in one area, migrating to another region, and nesting again there within the same year, to take advantage of shifting food resources. (2019-10-15)
Investing in love and affection pays off for species that mate for life
A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by biologists at the University of Chicago and the University of North Carolina explains how sexual cooperation and bonding evolves in bird species that form pair bonds. (2019-10-14)
The impact of human-caused noise pollution on birds
Anthropogenic noise pollution (ANP) is a globally invasive phenomenon impacting natural systems, but most research has occurred at local scales with few species. (2019-10-11)
Removing invasive mice from the Farallon Islands would benefit threatened birds
New research from Point Blue Conservation Science shows the significant negative impact that invasive, non-native house mice on the Farallon Islands are having to the threatened ashy storm-petrel. (2019-10-10)
Fairy-wrens change breeding habits to cope with climate change
Warmer temperatures linked to climate change are having a big impact on the breeding habits of one of Australia's most recognisable bird species, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU). (2019-10-10)
Reef fish caring for their young are taken advantage of by other fish
Among birds, the practice of laying eggs in other birds' nests is surprisingly common. (2019-10-09)
New parents? Tired of nighttime feedings? Bees can relate
Bumble bees tasked with caring for larvae and pupae sleep less than colony members who do not care for the young. (2019-10-03)
Implanted memories teach birds a song
A new songbird study that shows memories can be implanted in the brain to teach vocalizations -- without any lessons from the parent. (2019-10-03)
Daddy daycare: Why some songbirds care for the wrong kids
Interspecific feeding -- when an adult of one species feeds the young of another -- is rare among songbirds, and scientists could only speculate on why it occurs, but now, Penn State researchers have new insight into this behavior. (2019-10-03)
Mob mentality rules jackdaw flocks
Jackdaws are more likely to join a mob to drive off predators if lots of their fellow birds are up for the fight, new research shows. (2019-10-01)
Purple martin migration behavior perplexes researchers
Purple martins will soon migrate south for their usual wintertime retreat, but this time the birds will be wearing what look like little backpacks, so scientists can track their roosting sites along the way. (2019-09-30)
Bateman's cowbirds
Researchers at Illinois have discovered that cowbirds conform to Bateman's Principle, despite investing no energy into parental care. (2019-09-30)
Collapse of desert bird populations likely due to heat stress from climate change
Last year, UC Berkeley biologists discovered that bird populations in the Mojave Desert had crashed over the past 100 years. (2019-09-30)
T. rex used a stiff skull to eat its prey
A Tyrannosaurus rex could bite hard enough to shatter the bones of its prey. (2019-09-25)
Bird droppings defy expectations
Prevailing wisdom ranks uric acid as the primary ingredient in bird 'poop,' which is comprised mostly of urine. (2019-09-24)
Jackdaws learn from each other about 'dangerous' humans
Jackdaws can learn from each other to identify 'dangerous' humans, new research shows. (2019-09-24)
Discovery of sorghum gene that controls bird feeding could help protect crops
A single gene in sorghum controls bird feeding behavior by simultaneously regulating the production of bad-tasting molecules and attractive volatiles, according to a study publishing Sept. (2019-09-23)
Diving birds follow each other when fishing
Diving seabirds watch each other to work out when to dive, new research shows. (2019-09-23)
Nearly three billion fewer birds in North America since 1970
North America has lost nearly three billion birds since 1970, according to a new report, which also details widespread population declines among hundreds of North American bird species, including those once considered abundant. (2019-09-19)
Genetically tailored instruction improves songbird learning
A new UC San Francisco study conducted in songbirds demonstrates that what at first appear to be genetic constraints on birds' song learning abilities could be largely eliminated by tailoring instruction to better match the birds' inborn predispositions. (2019-09-18)
Coastal birds can weather the storm, but not the sea
Coastal birds survive because their populations can absorb impacts and recover quickly from hurricanes--even storms many times larger than anything previously observed. (2019-09-18)
Scientists identify previously unknown 'hybrid zone' between hummingbird species
We usually think of a species as being reproductively isolated -- that is, not mating with other species in the wild. (2019-09-17)
Global warming makes it harder for birds to mate, study finds
New research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and University of Porto (CIBIO-InBIO) shows how global warming could reduce the mating activity and success of grassland birds. (2019-09-17)
Scientists discover one of world's oldest bird species in Waipara, New Zealand
The ancestor of some of the largest flying birds ever has been found in Waipara, New Zealand. (2019-09-17)
Why do birds migrate at night?
Researchers found migratory birds maximize how much light they get from their environment, so they can migrate even at night.  (2019-09-12)
Conservation of a Central American region is critical for migrating birds
A new paper in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, published by Oxford University Press, identifies a previously overlooked area that is critical for conservation: the region between southern Mexico and Guatemala where songbirds fuel up for a grueling flight across the Gulf of Mexico. (2019-09-12)
Controversial insecticides shown to threaten survival of wild birds
New University of Saskatchewan research shows how the world's most widely used insecticides could be partly responsible for dramatic declines in farmland bird populations. (2019-09-12)
Neonicotinoid insecticides cause rapid weight loss and travel delays in migrating songbirds
Songbirds exposed to imidacloprid, a widely used neonicotinoid insecticide, exhibit anorexic behavior, reduced body weight and delays in their migratory itinerary, according to a new study. (2019-09-12)
Squirrels listen in to birds' conversations as signal of safety
Grey squirrels eavesdrop on the chatter between nearby songbirds as a sign of safety, according to a paper by Marie Lilly and colleagues at Oberlin College in the United States, publishing Sept. (2019-09-04)
Birds in serious decline at Lake Constance
In the past 30 years, the number of breeding pairs in the region has dropped by 25 percent from 465,000 in the eighties to 345,000 by 2012. (2019-09-03)
Slowed metabolism helps geese fly high
A few years before NASA astronaut Jessica Meir began learning to fly a spacecraft for her upcoming trip to the International Space Station, she was in flight-training of a different kind: teaching bar-headed geese how to fly in a wind tunnel at the University of British Columbia. (2019-09-03)
Native birds in South-eastern Australia worst affected by habitat
New research has found that habitat loss is a major concern for hundreds of Australian bird species, and south-eastern Australia has been the worst affected. (2019-09-02)
New insights into genetic basis of bird migration
A gene newly associated with the migratory patterns of golden-winged and blue-winged warblers could lend insight into the longstanding question of how birds migrate across such long distances. (2019-08-28)
Using artificial intelligence to track birds' dark-of-night migrations
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Cornell University have unveiled a machine learning system called 'MistNet' to extract bird data from the radar record and to take advantage of the treasure trove of bird migration information in the decades-long radar data archives. (2019-08-28)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.