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Current Birth control News and Events

Current Birth control News and Events, Birth control News Articles.
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Point-of-care diagnostic for detecting preterm birth on horizon
A new study provides a first step toward the development of an inexpensive point-of-care diagnostic test to assess the presence of known risk factors for preterm birth in resource-poor areas. (2019-10-22)
Born premature, how common to be adult with no major health conditions?
This observational study looked at how common it was for people born premature to become adults without any major health conditions such as asthma, hypertension, diabetes and epilepsy, all of which have been associated with preterm birth. (2019-10-22)
Children are more likely to have higher blood pressure by age six if their mother used snus, a Swedish, powdered tobacco product, during pregnancy
Children exposed to Swedish snus (a moist, powdered tobacco placed between the gums and upper lip) in the womb have higher systolic blood pressure than children not exposed to nicotine products during fetal development. (2019-10-16)
Polyamorous families face stigma during pregnancy and birth
Polyamorous families experience marginalization during pregnancy and birth, but with open, nonjudgmental attitudes from health care providers and changes to hospital policies, this can be reduced, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-10-15)
Both Democrat and Republican likely voters strongly support sex education in schools
Democrats and Republicans disagree on many policies but not on sex education for teenagers, a Rutgers-led national survey finds. (2019-10-15)
Heavier birth weight linked to childhood allergies
New research shows that the more a baby weighs at birth relative to its gestational age the higher the risk they will suffer from childhood food allergy or eczema, although not hay fever. (2019-10-15)
Weight-loss surgery cuts risk of birth defects
Children born to women who underwent gastric bypass surgery before becoming pregnant had a lower risk of major birth defects than children born to women who had severe obesity at the start of their pregnancy. (2019-10-15)
Association between weight-loss surgery in women and risk of birth defects in infants
Researchers used national registry data in Sweden to examine the risk of major birth defects in infants born to women who had gastric bypass surgery compared with infants born to women who didn't have the surgery but were similar based on other factors including maternal body mass index and diabetes. (2019-10-15)
Gut immunity more developed before birth than previously thought
The first comprehensive look at the immune system of the fetal gut shows that it is far more developed before birth, and could help develop new maternal vaccines and reveal if we are predisposed to autoimmune diseases before birth. (2019-10-10)
Prenatal stress could affect baby's brain, say researchers
New research from King's College London has found that maternal stress before and during pregnancy could affect a baby's brain development. (2019-10-08)
Yale study examines shifts in fertility rates among Generation X women
A new, Yale-led study examines shifts in fertility behaviors among Generation X women in the United States -- those born between 1965-1982 -- compared to their Baby Boomer counterparts, and explores whether the fertility of college-educated women is increasing more quickly across cohorts in Generation X than the fertility of their less educated counterparts. (2019-10-08)
New evidence on the mistreatment of women during childbirth
New evidence from a World Health Organization (WHO)-led study in four countries shows more than one-third of women experience mistreatment during childbirth in health facilities. (2019-10-08)
High lead levels during pregnancy linked to child obesity, NIH-funded study suggests
Children born to women who have high blood levels of lead are more likely be overweight or obese, compared to those whose mothers have low levels of lead in their blood, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health and Health Resources and Services Administration. (2019-10-03)
Different views on vaginal birth after previous caesarean section (VBAC)
There is considerable variations in different countries┬┤ health care systems and professionals in the views on vaginal birth after previous caesarean section (VBAC), according to a European study. (2019-10-03)
WVU researchers study link between low birth weight and cardiovascular risk
In a recent study, West Virginia University researcher Amna Umer discovered that if children had a low birth weight, they were more likely to exhibit cardiovascular risk factors in fifth grade. (2019-10-03)
Teens taking oral contraceptives may be at increased risk for depressive symptoms
In a study published in JAMA Psychiatry, investigators report that there was no association between oral contraceptive use and depressive symptom severity in the entire population they studied (ages 16 through 25). (2019-10-02)
ADHD and risk of giving birth as teenagers
Data were used from about 384,000 girls and women in Sweden (including 6,410 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder) who gave birth for the first time between 2007-2014 to examine whether those with ADHD have an increased likelihood of giving birth as teenagers. (2019-10-02)
Gut bacteria is key factor in childhood obesity
New information published by scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Health suggests that gut bacteria and its interactions with immune cells and metabolic organs, including fat tissue, play a key role in childhood obesity. (2019-10-02)
Discovered new regulation for infant growth
Researchers at the University of Bergen in Norway have identified new genetic signals for the regulation of how infants grow. (2019-10-01)
Antidepressants linked to heightened pregnancy related diabetes risk
Taking antidepressants while expecting a baby is linked to a heightened risk of developing diabetes that is specifically related to pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-10-01)
Babies have fewer respiratory infections if they have well-connected bacterial networks
Microscopic bacteria, which are present in all humans, cluster together and form communities in different parts of the body, such as the gut, lungs, nose and mouth. (2019-09-30)
Analyses of newborn babies' head odors suggest importance in facilitating bonding
A team led by Kobe University Professor Mamiko Ozaki has become the first to identify the chemical makeup of the odors produced by newborn babies' heads. (2019-09-27)
Secret-shopper-style study shows online birth control prescription overall safe, efficient
Secret-shopper-style study of nine Web-based and digital-app vendors of contraception scripts shows their services are overall safe and efficient. (2019-09-25)
Outcomes of birth options after a previous cesarean section
A large cohort study of women who have had one or more previous cesarean sections suggests that attempting a vaginal birth in a subsequent pregnancy is associated with higher health risks to both the mother and the infant than electing for another cesarean. (2019-09-24)
One way childhood trauma leads to poorer health for women
Researchers have long known that childhood trauma is linked to poorer health for women at midlife. (2019-09-17)
Accounting for influencing factors when estimating suicide rates among US youth
Using unadjusted suicide rates to describe trends may be skewed because they are affected by differences in age and year of birth. (2019-09-13)
Simple model captures almost 100 years of measles dynamics in London
A simple epidemiological model accurately captures long-term measles transmission dynamics in London, including major perturbations triggered by historical events. (2019-09-12)
Resilience protects pregnant women against negative effects of stress
Researchers from the University of Granada have, for the first time, analysed the protective role of resilience in pregnancy, by studying the levels of cortisol present in the expectant mother's hair, along with her psychological state. (2019-09-06)
Novel study reveals presence of fungal DNA in the fetal human gut
A recent human study published in The FASEB Journal discovered the presence of fungal communities in the fetal gut. (2019-09-05)
Fetching water increases risk of childhood death
Water fetching is associated with poor health outcomes for women and children, including a higher risk of death. (2019-09-03)
Assisted reproduction technology leaves its mark on genes temporarily, study shows
Any effect that assisted reproduction technology has on babies' genes is largely corrected by adulthood, new research led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute has found. (2019-09-02)
First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives
By analyzing the fossilized teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, a team of scientists led by the universities of Bristol (UK) and Lyon (France) have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives. (2019-08-29)
Teen birth control use linked to depression risk in adulthood
Women who used oral contraceptives during adolescence are more likely to develop depression as adults, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia. (2019-08-28)
Autism rates increasing fastest among black, Hispanic youth
Autism rates among black and HIspanic children are catching up to and, in many states, exceeding rates among white youth, who have historically had higher prevalence, a new study shows. (2019-08-28)
What we don't know about prenatal opioid exposure
'Will the baby be OK?' In cases of prenatal opioid exposure, the answer is unclear. (2019-08-28)
Pregnant women of color experience disempowerment by health care providers
A new study finds that women of color perceive their interactions with doctors, nurses and midwives as being misleading, with information being 'packaged' in such a way as to disempower them by limiting maternity healthcare choices for themselves and their children. (2019-08-27)
From cradle to grave: postnatal overnutrition linked to aging
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have found a new answer to an old question: how can overnutrition during infancy lead to long-lasting health problems such as diabetes? (2019-08-26)
Five things you might not want to mix with birth control (video)
Many forms of birth control are hormone-based--but not everything mixes well with those hormones. (2019-08-22)
China's two-child policy has led to 5.4 million extra births
The introduction of China's universal two-child policy, that permits all couples to have two children, has led to an extra 5.4 million births, finds a study in The BMJ today. (2019-08-21)
Scientists unlock secrets of maternal/fetal cellular communication during pregnancy
Researchers have unlocked mysteries surrounding how a pregnant mother's cells and her fetus' cells communicate throughout pregnancy. (2019-08-21)
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