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Current Birth defects News and Events

Current Birth defects News and Events, Birth defects News Articles.
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Polyamorous families face stigma during pregnancy and birth
Polyamorous families experience marginalization during pregnancy and birth, but with open, nonjudgmental attitudes from health care providers and changes to hospital policies, this can be reduced, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-10-15)
Heavier birth weight linked to childhood allergies
New research shows that the more a baby weighs at birth relative to its gestational age the higher the risk they will suffer from childhood food allergy or eczema, although not hay fever. (2019-10-15)
Weight-loss surgery cuts risk of birth defects
Children born to women who underwent gastric bypass surgery before becoming pregnant had a lower risk of major birth defects than children born to women who had severe obesity at the start of their pregnancy. (2019-10-15)
Association between weight-loss surgery in women and risk of birth defects in infants
Researchers used national registry data in Sweden to examine the risk of major birth defects in infants born to women who had gastric bypass surgery compared with infants born to women who didn't have the surgery but were similar based on other factors including maternal body mass index and diabetes. (2019-10-15)
Solving the mystery of quantum light in thin layers
Tungsten diselenide emits light with very special properties. Nobody could tell why -- but now, scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have solved the riddle: a combination of atomic defects in the material and microscopic distortion is responsible for the remarkable effect. (2019-10-15)
RUDN researchers proved that flash-memory 'fingerprints' of electronic devices are truly unique
Experts in applied mathematics at RUDN University have experimentally proved that it is possible to accurately identify electronic devices by defects in flash memory cells. (2019-10-14)
Gut immunity more developed before birth than previously thought
The first comprehensive look at the immune system of the fetal gut shows that it is far more developed before birth, and could help develop new maternal vaccines and reveal if we are predisposed to autoimmune diseases before birth. (2019-10-10)
Researchers are finding molecular mechanisms behind women's biological clock
Throughout life, women's fertility curve goes up and down, and in a new study led by the University of Copenhagen, researchers have now shown why. (2019-10-09)
New study challenges our understanding of premature ageing
Disturbances in the function of mitochondrial DNA can accelerate the ageing process in ways that are different than previously thought, according to a new Finnish study published in Nature Metabolism. (2019-10-08)
Prenatal stress could affect baby's brain, say researchers
New research from King's College London has found that maternal stress before and during pregnancy could affect a baby's brain development. (2019-10-08)
Yale study examines shifts in fertility rates among Generation X women
A new, Yale-led study examines shifts in fertility behaviors among Generation X women in the United States -- those born between 1965-1982 -- compared to their Baby Boomer counterparts, and explores whether the fertility of college-educated women is increasing more quickly across cohorts in Generation X than the fertility of their less educated counterparts. (2019-10-08)
New evidence on the mistreatment of women during childbirth
New evidence from a World Health Organization (WHO)-led study in four countries shows more than one-third of women experience mistreatment during childbirth in health facilities. (2019-10-08)
Initiating breastfeeding in vulnerable infants
The benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and child are well-recognized, including for late preterm infants (LPI). (2019-10-07)
The story of thalidomide continues
An international study co-authored by researchers at Tokyo Tech and Tokyo Medical University has unveiled a detailed view of how thalidomide, one of the most notorious drugs ever developed, causes abnormalities in limb and ear development. (2019-10-07)
Fathers-to-be should avoid alcohol six months before conception
Aspiring parents should both avoid drinking alcohol prior to conception to protect against congenital heart defects, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2019-10-03)
High lead levels during pregnancy linked to child obesity, NIH-funded study suggests
Children born to women who have high blood levels of lead are more likely be overweight or obese, compared to those whose mothers have low levels of lead in their blood, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health and Health Resources and Services Administration. (2019-10-03)
Careful monitoring of children following cardiac surgery may improve long-term outcomes
In a medical records study covering thousands of children, a US-Canadian team led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine concludes that while surgery to correct congenital heart disease (CHD) within 10 years after birth may restore young hearts to healthy function. (2019-10-03)
Different views on vaginal birth after previous caesarean section (VBAC)
There is considerable variations in different countries´ health care systems and professionals in the views on vaginal birth after previous caesarean section (VBAC), according to a European study. (2019-10-03)
WVU researchers study link between low birth weight and cardiovascular risk
In a recent study, West Virginia University researcher Amna Umer discovered that if children had a low birth weight, they were more likely to exhibit cardiovascular risk factors in fifth grade. (2019-10-03)
ADHD and risk of giving birth as teenagers
Data were used from about 384,000 girls and women in Sweden (including 6,410 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder) who gave birth for the first time between 2007-2014 to examine whether those with ADHD have an increased likelihood of giving birth as teenagers. (2019-10-02)
Hard as ceramic, tough as steel: Newly discovered connection could help design of nextgen alloys
A new way to calculate the interaction between a metal and its alloying material could speed the hunt for a new material that combines the hardness of ceramic with the resilience of metal. (2019-10-02)
Inventing the world's strongest silver
A team of scientists has made the strongest silver ever--42 percent stronger than the previous world record. (2019-10-02)
Babies have fewer respiratory infections if they have well-connected bacterial networks
Microscopic bacteria, which are present in all humans, cluster together and form communities in different parts of the body, such as the gut, lungs, nose and mouth. (2019-09-30)
Secret-shopper-style study shows online birth control prescription overall safe, efficient
Secret-shopper-style study of nine Web-based and digital-app vendors of contraception scripts shows their services are overall safe and efficient. (2019-09-25)
Scientists observe how acoustic interactions change materials at the atomic level
By using sound waves, scientists have begun to explore fundamental stress behaviors in a crystalline material that could form the basis for quantum information technologies. (2019-09-24)
Outcomes of birth options after a previous cesarean section
A large cohort study of women who have had one or more previous cesarean sections suggests that attempting a vaginal birth in a subsequent pregnancy is associated with higher health risks to both the mother and the infant than electing for another cesarean. (2019-09-24)
One way childhood trauma leads to poorer health for women
Researchers have long known that childhood trauma is linked to poorer health for women at midlife. (2019-09-17)
Defective cilia linked to heart valve birth defects
Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), the most common heart valve birth defect, is associated with genetic variation in human primary cilia during heart valve development, report Medical University of South Carolina researchers in Circulation. (2019-09-16)
Accounting for influencing factors when estimating suicide rates among US youth
Using unadjusted suicide rates to describe trends may be skewed because they are affected by differences in age and year of birth. (2019-09-13)
New metamaterial morphs into new shapes, taking on new properties
Electrochemical reactions drive shape change in new nanoarchitected metamaterial. (2019-09-11)
Numerical simulations probe mechanisms behind sand dune formation
After noticing how the construction of dams significantly alter the hydrodynamics of natural rivers and the resulting downstream riverbed evolution, researchers decided to apply numerical simulations to help determine what's at play in the relationship of sediment motion and flow conditions. (2019-09-10)
Researchers pinpoint animal model proteins important in study of human disease
Little is known about the proteins and cellular pathways that lead to the formation of the human heart or the roles various proteins and pathways might play in cardiac disease. (2019-09-10)
The secret strength of gnashing teeth
There's a method to finite element modeling for materials microarchitecture to make super strong glass. (2019-09-10)
Resilience protects pregnant women against negative effects of stress
Researchers from the University of Granada have, for the first time, analysed the protective role of resilience in pregnancy, by studying the levels of cortisol present in the expectant mother's hair, along with her psychological state. (2019-09-06)
Silicon as a semiconductor: Silicon carbide would be much more efficient
In power electronics, semiconductors are based on the element silicon -- but the energy efficiency of silicon carbide would be much higher. (2019-09-05)
Novel study reveals presence of fungal DNA in the fetal human gut
A recent human study published in The FASEB Journal discovered the presence of fungal communities in the fetal gut. (2019-09-05)
A novel recipe for efficiently removing intrinsic defects from hard crystals
A team of researchers from Osaka University, the Institute for High Pressure Physics and the Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russia), and TU Dresden (Germany), discovered an effective method for removing lattice defects from crystals. (2019-09-04)
Future of LEDs Gets Boost from Verification of Localization States in InGaN Quantum Wells
LEDs made of indium gallium nitride provide better luminescence efficiency than many of the other materials used to create blue and green LEDs, but a big challenge of working with InGaN is its known dislocation density defects that make it difficult to understand its emission properties. (2019-09-04)
Fetching water increases risk of childhood death
Water fetching is associated with poor health outcomes for women and children, including a higher risk of death. (2019-09-03)
Assisted reproduction technology leaves its mark on genes temporarily, study shows
Any effect that assisted reproduction technology has on babies' genes is largely corrected by adulthood, new research led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute has found. (2019-09-02)
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