Nav: Home

Current Birth defects News and Events

Current Birth defects News and Events, Birth defects News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Home monitoring program improves survival between surgeries for babies with certain heart defects
Home monitoring programs for infants who have undergone the first of multiple surgeries to mend a single ventricle heart defect - called the 'interstage' period - have led to a 40% decrease in deaths. (2020-08-11)
Racial, socioeconomic disparities fuel increased infant mortality rates in California
While infant mortality rates (IMR) decreased overall from 2007 to 2015 in California, disparities in infant death rates have increased in some groups, including among obese mothers, those who smoke and African American women, according to a new study published in PLOS One. (2020-08-11)
Stellar egg hunt with ALMA
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) took a census of stellar eggs in the constellation Taurus and revealed their evolution state. (2020-08-07)
Embryonic heart development: Unprecedented insight from 4D OCT
Thanks to innovations in light-based technology, fresh insights are now available into the biomechanics of mammalian cardiogenesis--and in particular, the pumping dynamics of the mammalian tubular embryonic heart. (2020-08-06)
Are we medically intervening in maternity care when we don't need to?
Researchers from the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Trinity College Dublin have provided an international perspective on differences in key birth interventions as part of a European research network which aims to understand and contextualise physiological labour and birth. (2020-08-06)
HPV vaccination linked to lower risk of precancerous condition
Vaccination against the human papilloma virus (HPV) reduces the risk of a condition that often leads to cervical cancer, according to an analysis of Danish health registry data. (2020-08-05)
Blood test could diagnose baby brain damage just hours after birth
An early blood test could detect which babies deprived of oxygen at birth are at risk of serious neurodisabilities like cerebral palsy and epilepsy. (2020-08-04)
HIIT programs show benefits for those with Down syndrome
Incorporating high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, into exercise programs for individuals with Down syndrome may help achieve critical health outcomes in a more time-efficient manner, according to new researcher. (2020-08-04)
Child sleep problems associated with impaired academic and psychosocial functioning
A new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found that sleep disturbances at any age are associated with diminished well-being by the time the children are 10 or 11 years old. (2020-08-03)
COVID-19 may cause deadly blood clots
COVID-19 may increase the risk of blot cots in women who are pregnant or taking estrogen with birth control or hormone replacement therapy, according to a new manuscript published in the Endocrine Society's journal, Endocrinology. (2020-07-29)
Nondestructive positron beams probe damage, support safety advances in radiation environments
A multi-institution team has used positron beams to probe the nature of radiation effects, providing new insight into how damage is produced in iron films. (2020-07-29)
Iron deficiency during infancy reduces vaccine efficacy
About 40 percent of children around the globe suffer from anaemia because they do not consume enough iron. (2020-07-28)
'Etch-a-Sketching' critical p-n nano-junctions for 2D Semiconductor diode
Elisa Riedo, professor at the New York University (NYU) Tandon school of Engineering led an international team that used thermal scanning probe lithography (t-SPL) to fabricate state-of-the-art ''p-n junctions'' on a single atomic layer of molybdeunum disulfide (MoS2) a transition metal dichalcogenide. (2020-07-28)
Medicaid-covered mothers have less say in birthing experience: BU study
Giving birth in the United States is a radically different experience based on race and income, illustrated most brutally by the Black and Indigenous maternal mortality crisis. (2020-07-28)
Solving materials problems with a quantum computer
Scientists at Argonne and the University of Chicago have developed a method paving the way to using quantum computers to simulate realistic molecules and complex materials. (2020-07-28)
Vacancy dynamics on CO-covered Pt(111) electrodes
USTC reported in situ video-STM observations of additional point defects in the presence of this dynamic CO adlayer. (2020-07-25)
Big brains and dexterous hands
Primates with large brains can master more complex hand movements than those with smaller brains. (2020-07-24)
Le Bonheur Children's Hospital trial: Intravenous indomethacin more effective for hsPDAs
Le Bonheur and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center neonatologists, led by Jennifer M. (2020-07-22)
"Winter is coming": The influence of seasonality on pathogen emergence
Seasonal fluctuations drive the dynamics of many infectious diseases. For instance, the flu spreads more readily in winter. (2020-07-21)
Race and ethnicity did not affect outcomes for new moms with COVID-19, finds study
Hispanic mothers had higher rates of COVID-19 than other groups of women, but ethnicity had no effect on outcomes among women with COVID-19 who delivered at two hospitals in northern Manhattan. (2020-07-21)
First in-depth insights into parturition in rhinos
Scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research together with zoo veterinarians closely monitored 19 pregnant white rhinos in six European zoos and recorded timelines for pre-birth development, milk production, hormone levels, gestation length and documented the onset of parturition, different stages of labour and foetal position at birth. (2020-07-20)
Mutant zebrafish reveals a turning point in spine's evolution
A chance mutation that led to spinal defects in a zebrafish has opened a little window into our own fishy past. (2020-07-20)
Research helping to improve detection of disease in newborn babies
New research will help health-care practitioners to more accurately diagnose disease and illness in newborn babies from urine samples, according to a study by researchers at the University of Alberta and the Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas. (2020-07-16)
Study of natural gas flaring finds high risks to babies
Researchers from USC and UCLA have found that exposure to flaring -- the burning off of excess natural gas -- at oil and gas production sites is associated with 50% higher odds of preterm birth, compared with no exposure. (2020-07-15)
Cost prevents one in five US women from using their preferred contraception
Recent Supreme Court Ruling Will Increase Birth Control Costs for Many Women, Make it Less Likely They Will Use the Birth Control They Want (2020-07-13)
Airplane noise appears to negatively impact fetal health
For the first time, researchers have provided a causal estimate linking high-level noise exposure to another key health challenge: low birth weight (< 2,500 grams or approximately 5.5 pounds). (2020-07-13)
A dual antenatal therapy benefits extreme preterm babies better than either alone or none
Researchers, led by Samuel Gentle, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics in the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, report that antenatal treatment with both magnesium sulfate and corticosteroids together yields an increased benefit for children born at 22 to 26 weeks of gestation, compared to no antenatal treatment or with either therapy alone. (2020-07-13)
New biomarker for dementia diagnosis
Medical researchers in the UK and Australia have identified a new marker which could support the search for novel preventative and therapeutic treatments for dementia. (2020-07-10)
Women who deliver by C-section are less likely to conceive subsequent children
Women who deliver their first child by cesarean section (C-section) are less likely to conceive a second child than those who deliver vaginally, despite being just as likely to plan a subsequent pregnancy, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (2020-07-09)
Bacteria in infants' first stool may indicate their risk of obesity
Meconium--the earliest stool of an infant -- is composed of materials ingested during the time the infant spends in the uterus. (2020-07-08)
Regulating the properties of MAPbBr3 single crystal via voltage and application
Defect density is one of the most significant characteristics of perovskite single crystals (PSCs) that determines their optical and electrical properties, but few strategies are available to tune this property. (2020-07-08)
Scaling up the quantum chip
MIT researchers have developed a process to manufacture and integrate 'artificial atoms,' created by atomic-scale defects in microscopically thin slices of diamond, with photonic circuitry, producing the largest quantum chip of its type. (2020-07-08)
Measuring tape is a critical tool for following Zika virus-exposed children
A simple measuring tape could be the key to identifying which children could develop neurological and developmental abnormalities from Zika virus exposure during gestation. (2020-07-07)
The risk of cerebral palsy linked to IVF has more than halved in the past two decades
Fifteen years ago a large population study from Denmark found a significantly increased risk of cerebral palsy in infants born as a result of assisted reproduction. (2020-07-07)
Great expectations: Patients overestimate success in IVF
Couples embarking on IVF to treat their infertility tend to overestimate their chance of success, according to a prospective study of 69 couples having at least their second treatment attempt. (2020-07-07)
New link between calcium and cardiolipin in heart defects
To function properly, the heart needs energy from cells' powerhouses, the mitochondria. (2020-07-07)
Low-threshold topological nanolasers based on the second-order corner state
Topological lasers are immune to imperfections and disorder, which are mostly at microscale. (2020-07-06)
Herpesvirsuses hedge their bets to optimize survival
In a new paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Gladstone researchers detail how cytomegalovirus enters its dormant state: by varying the levels of some proteins in its viral particles. (2020-07-06)
Apgar score effective in assessing health of preterm infants
The vitality of preterm infants should be assessed with an Apgar score, a tool used to measure the health of newborns immediately after birth. (2020-07-02)
Researchers develop computational model to build better capacitors
Researchers have developed a computational model that helps users understand how changes in the nanostructure of materials affect their conductivity - with the goal of informing the development of new energy storage devices for a wide range of electronics. (2020-07-01)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Our Relationship With Water
We need water to live. But with rising seas and so many lacking clean water – water is in crisis and so are we. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around restoring our relationship with water. Guests on the show include legal scholar Kelsey Leonard, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier, and community organizer Colette Pichon Battle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#569 Facing Fear
What do you fear? I mean really fear? Well, ok, maybe right now that's tough. We're living in a new age and definition of fear. But what do we do about it? Eva Holland has faced her fears, including trauma and phobia. She lived to tell the tale and write a book: "Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.