Nav: Home

Current Black carbon News and Events

Current Black carbon News and Events, Black carbon News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
More sensitive climates are more variable climates, research shows
A decade without any global warming is more likely to happen if the climate is more sensitive to carbon dioxide emissions, new research has revealed. (2019-07-22)
Texas' strategic goal for students' debt burden shows potential promise and pitfalls
College students in Texas who graduated from public universities with a bachelor's degree had, on average, student loan debts that equaled 74% of what they earned in their first-year wages, according to a new study from SMU (Southern Methodist University). The study, which looked at students who started college between 2004 and 2008, also shows that black and Latinx students are predicted to borrow larger amounts of college debt than white students compared to what they'll make in their first job.  (2019-07-22)
Racial disparity in fatal officer-involved shootings
New study finds white officers are not more likely to shoot minority civilians than black or Hispanic officers. (2019-07-22)
The truth behind racial disparities in fatal police shootings
In a sweeping and comprehensive review of every police shooting across the nation, researchers find that white police officers are not more likely to shoot minorities citizens than non-white officers. (2019-07-22)
Teacher treatment of students factors into racial gap in school suspensions
An analysis led by Brown sociologist Jayanti Owens found that different treatment of black and white students accounted for half of the racial gap in school suspensions and expulsions among 5- to 9-year-old children. (2019-07-19)
Study finds maternal race not a factor for children experiencing a 'language gap'
Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute have discovered that race plays no role in the amount and quality of the words mothers use with their children, or with the language skills their children later develop. (2019-07-18)
Study reveals unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest
Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon. (2019-07-18)
High magnetic field of 10T during activated carbon production improves micropore capacity by 35%
Carbon materials such as nanotubes, graphene, activated carbon and graphite are in high demand. (2019-07-17)
Neighborhood environment and health
It is well understood that urban black males are at a disproportionately high risk of poor health outcomes. (2019-07-17)
Lifting the fog on carbon budgets
The concept of a carbon budget has become a popular tool in guiding climate policy since the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report was released in 2014. (2019-07-17)
What counts for our climate: Carbon budgets untangled
The more CO2 we emit from burning coal and oil and gas, the more we heat our climate -- this sounds simple, and it is. (2019-07-17)
One in 270 births have 'dual burden' of prematurity and severe maternal complications
A quarter of women who have serious maternal complications during childbirth also have premature births, posing a 'dual burden' on families, finds research from NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) California Preterm Birth Initiative, and Stanford University. (2019-07-17)
Backed in black: How to get people to buy more produce
Researchers may have figured out the secret to get people to buy more fresh produce: dress veggies up in black. (2019-07-16)
Get up and go bots getting closer, study says
Robotics researchers at the University of California San Diego have for the first time used a commercial 3D printer to embed complex sensors inside robotic limbs and grippers. (2019-07-16)
Research shows black plastics could create renewable energy
New study looks at how plastics can be recycled and could help reduce plastic waste. (2019-07-16)
Meet the six-legged superfoods: Grasshoppers top insect antioxidant-rich list
For the first time, a study has measured antioxidant levels in commercially available edible insects. (2019-07-15)
An entry to optically active oxazolidinones: The use of neutral phosphonium salt catalysts
Oxazolidinones are coveted in the field of pharmacology for their bioactive properties. (2019-07-12)
Researchers reveal mechanisms for regulating temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decompos
Recently, a research team led by Prof. YANG Yuanhe from the Institute of Botany elucidated the mechanisms underlying vertical variations in Q10. Based on the natural gradient of soil profile in Tibetan alpine grasslands, the team collected soil samples at two soil depths and then conducted long-term incubation, SOM decomposition modeling and manipulative experiments. (2019-07-12)
Hear them roar: How humans and chickadees understand each other
Is there something universal about the sounds we make that allows vocal learners -- like songbirds -- to figure out how we're feeling? (2019-07-12)
Shifts to renewable energy can drive up energy poverty, PSU study finds
Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new Portland State University study (2019-07-12)
Hubble uncovers black hole that shouldn't exist
As if black holes weren't mysterious enough, astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found an unexpected thin disk of material furiously whirling around a supermassive black hole at the heart of the magnificent spiral galaxy NGC 3147, located 130 million light-years away. (2019-07-11)
Hubble discovers mysterious black hole disc
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed an unexpected thin disc of material encircling a supermassive black hole at the heart of the spiral galaxy NGC 3147, located 130 million light-years away. (2019-07-11)
Bystander CPR less likely for black kids in poorest neighborhoods
African-American kids from the most disadvantaged areas are about half as likely to receive emergency bystander CPR following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest than white children in disadvantaged or more prosperous neighborhoods. (2019-07-10)
Pair of supermassive black holes discovered on a collision course
Astronomers have spotted a pair of supermassive black holes on a collision course in a galaxy 2.5 billion light-years away. (2019-07-10)
Scientists decode DNA secrets of world's toughest bean
UC Riverside scientists have decoded the genome of black-eyed peas, offering hope for feeding Earth's expanding population, especially as the climate changes. (2019-07-09)
Interstellar iron isn't missing, it's just hiding in plain sight
ASU cosmochemists have found that interstellar iron and carbon form a kind of linked molecule that cloaks the iron -- and helps stabilize large carbon molecules. (2019-07-09)
'You all look alike to me' is hard-wired in us, UCR research finds
We are hard-wired to process -- or not process -- facial differences based on race. (2019-07-08)
Producing graphene from carbon dioxide
The general public knows the chemical compound of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and because of its global-warming effect. (2019-07-08)
Supercomputer shows 'Chameleon Theory' could change how we think about gravity
Supercomputer simulations of galaxies have shown that Einstein's theory of General Relativity might not be the only way to explain how gravity works or how galaxies form. (2019-07-08)
Playfully discover atom manipulation
The team of Toma Susi at the University of Vienna uses an electron microscope to manipulate strongly bound materials with atomic precision. (2019-07-08)
Study: Some stereotypes seem to be universally applied to biracial groups in the US
A new Northwestern University study has found evidence that there are some stereotypes that seem to be universally applied to biracial groups in the U.S. (2019-07-08)
Breaching a 'carbon threshold' could lead to mass extinction
Carbon dioxide emissions may trigger a reflex in the carbon cycle, with devastating consequences, study finds. (2019-07-08)
BU finds police shooting racial disparities reflect segregation
Racial residential segregation is the predominant factor that explains why some cities have greater racial disparities in fatal police shootings than others, according to a new study by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers published in the Journal of the National Medical Association. (2019-07-08)
NASA-NOAA satellite sees smoke from multiple fires in New Mexico
The USFo rest Service's Gila National Forest reported four naturally caused fires on July 4, 2019, and three of them generated enough smoke to be seen from space by satellite. (2019-07-05)
Area for restoring trees far greater than imagined and 'best climate change solution available'
In the first study to quantify how many trees the Earth can support, where, and how much carbon they could store, researchers report that Earth could support enough additional trees to cut carbon levels in the atmosphere by nearly 25% -- levels not seen for almost a century. (2019-07-04)
How trees could save the climate
Around 0.9 billion hectares of land worldwide would be suitable for reforestation, which could ultimately capture two thirds of human-made carbon emissions. (2019-07-04)
Black (nano)gold combat climate change
By using the techniques of nanotechnology, we transformed golden gold to black gold, by simply changing the size and gaps between gold nanoparticles. (2019-07-03)
Trendy on eight legs: Jumping spider named after fashion czar Karl Lagerfeld
New to science species of Australian jumping spider was named after Hamburg-born fashion icon Karl Lagerfeld (1933-2019) after the arachnid reminded its discoverers of the designer. (2019-07-02)
Bionic catalysts to produce clean energy
A biohybrid material that combines reduced graphene oxide with bacterial cells offers an eco-friendly option to help store renewable energy. (2019-07-02)
The new racial disparity in special education
Racial disparity in special education is growing, and it's more complex than previously thought. (2019-07-02)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".