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Current Black carbon News and Events

Current Black carbon News and Events, Black carbon News Articles.
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Study finds relationship between racial discipline disparities and academic achievement gaps in US
An increase in either the discipline gap or the academic achievement gap between black and white students in the United States predicts a jump in the other, according to a new study published today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2019-10-16)
Going against the flow around a supermassive black hole
At the center of a galaxy called NGC 1068, a supermassive black hole hides within a thick doughnut-shaped cloud of dust and gas. (2019-10-15)
RUDN University soil scientists found out how abandoned arable land restores
Soil scientists from RUDN University have found that the rate of accumulation of organic carbon in wild, cultivated, and abandoned soils depends mainly on the type and composition of the soil, and, to a lesser extent, on the time elapsed since it was no longer cultivated. (2019-10-15)
Peeping into the black box of AI to discover how collective behaviors emerge
For decades, scientists seeking to explain the emergence of complex group behaviors, such as schooling in fish, have been divided into two camps. (2019-10-15)
UW study advances alignment of single-wall carbon nanotubes along common axis
The researchers used machine-vision automation and parallelization to simultaneously produce globally aligned, single-wall carbon nanotubes using pressure-driven filtration. (2019-10-15)
Study: Self-reported suicide attempts rising in black teens as other groups decline
New study in the journal Pediatrics uncovered rise in self-reported suicide attempts in black teenagers, as well as an accelerating rate in black female teenagers. (2019-10-14)
Breastfeeding disparities among us children by race/ethnicity
Overall rates of breastfeeding increased from 2009 to 2015 but they varied by race/ethnicity in this observational study that used national survey data for nearly 168,000 infants in the United States. (2019-10-14)
Study shows a much cheaper catalyst can generate hydrogen in a commercial device
SLAC and Stanford researchers have shown for the first time that a cheap catalyst can split water and generate hydrogen gas for hours on end in the harsh environment of a commercial electrolyzer -- a step toward clean, large-scale hydrogen production for fuel, fertilizer and industry. (2019-10-14)
New material captures carbon dioxide
The captured CO2 can be converted into useful organic materials. (2019-10-11)
Black holes stunt growth of dwarf galaxies
Astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, have discovered that powerful winds driven by supermassive black holes in the centers of dwarf galaxies have a significant impact on the evolution of these galaxies by suppressing star formation. (2019-10-11)
Children associate white, but not black, men with 'brilliant' stereotype, new study finds
The stereotype that associates being 'brilliant' with white men more than White women is shared by children regardless of their own race, finds a team of psychology researchers. (2019-10-10)
Sunlight degrades polystyrene much faster than expected
Polystyrene persists in the environment for millennia, according to some international governmental agencies. (2019-10-10)
Sunlight degrades polystyrene faster than expected
A study published by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that polystyrene, one of the world's most ubiquitous plastics, may degrade in decades or centuries when exposed to sunlight, rather than thousands of years as previously thought. (2019-10-10)
Study offers solution to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle
New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades. (2019-10-10)
Electrochemistry to benefit photonics: Nanotubes can control laser pulses
An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Laboratory of Nanomaterials at the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) has shown that the nonlinear optical response of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by electrochemical gating. (2019-10-10)
Researchers find multiple effects on soil from manure from cows administered antibiotics
A new study found multiple effects on soils from exposure to manure from cows administered antibiotics, including alteration of the soil microbiome and ecosystem functions, soil respiration and elemental cycling. (2019-10-09)
A new strategy for the synthesis of complex natural products
Chemists from the University of Basel have succeeded in synthesizing two complex natural products from the group of dithiodiketopiperazines (DTPs). (2019-10-09)
Women and black Americans more likely to face severe adult obesity
A multi-national study led by experts at Cincinnati Children's shows how adult severe obesity risk rates vary by sex, race and other factors identifiable in childhood. (2019-10-09)
Graphene substrate improves the conductivity of carbon nanotube network
Scientists at Aalto University, Finland, and the University of Vienna, Austria, have combined graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes into a transparent hybrid material with conductivity higher than either component exhibits separately. (2019-10-09)
Identifying a cyanobacterial gene family that helps control photosynthesis
A new Michigan State University study has identified a family of genes in cyanobacteria that help control carbon dioxide fixation. (2019-10-08)
Black and ethnic minority people face inequality in diabetes treatment
Black and ethnic minority people are not as likely to be prescribed newer medication for Type 2 diabetes and they experience less adequate monitoring of their condition compared to their white peers, new collaborative research from the University of Surrey and Eli Lilly and Company Limited finds. (2019-10-07)
Not long ago, the center of the Milky Way exploded
A titanic, expanding beam of energy sprang from close to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way just 3.5 million years ago, sending a cone-shaped burst of radiation through both poles of the galaxy and out into deep space. (2019-10-06)
Study finds managed forests in new hampshire rich in carbon
A Dartmouth-led study examining carbon stocks in an actively managed mixed wood forest in New Hampshire finds that places with more trees have more carbon stored in both the trees and the soil. (2019-10-03)
How to make carbon pricing palatable to air travellers
Travellers are willing to pay a little more for flights if they know the extra money will be used to address carbon emissions, a new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business has found. (2019-10-03)
Massive filaments fuel the growth of galaxies and supermassive black holes
Based on direct observations researchers have discovered massive filaments between galaxies in a proto-cluster, extending over more than 1 million parsecs and providing the fuel for intense formation of stars and the growth of super massive black holes within the proto-cluster. (2019-10-03)
Ancient genomes provide insight into the genetic history of the second plague pandemic
An international team of researchers has analyzed remains from ten archaeological sites in England, France, Germany, Russia, and Switzerland to gain insight into the different stages of the second plague pandemic and the genetic diversity of Yersinia pestis during and after the Black Death. (2019-10-02)
Decades-long drop in breast cancer death rate continues
A decades-long decline in the breast cancer death rate continues, but has begun to slow in recent years. (2019-10-02)
Study: Carbon emissions soar as tourism reaches new heights
A researcher at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) is examining how the flight routes people take to get to tourist destinations impact the amount of pollution in the air in a newly published study he coauthored in the Annals of Tourism Research. (2019-10-02)
Nuclear war between India and Pakistan would launch a global climate catastrophe
With ongoing tensions between India and Pakistan raising concerns about the possibility of nuclear conflict, even as neither country is likely to initiate without significant provocation, researchers have evaluated both the direct fatalities and global climate anomalies that would result if nuclear war did break out. (2019-10-02)
New research puts Australia at forefront of blue carbon economy
For the first time, scientist have accurately measured the amount of carbon dioxide being absorbed by marine ecosystems in Australia. (2019-10-01)
Study finds rising ozone a hidden threat to corn
By exposing a genetically diverse group of corn plants in the field to future ozone levels, researchers discovered hidden vulnerabilities. (2019-10-01)
New public-private research upends traditional carbon pricing and presents a more effective method for pricing emissions
Newly released public-private research proposes a new method for calculating carbon tax rates based on environmental, economic and social factors, including the costs the public pays for carbon usage such as damage to agriculture, vulnerable coastal infrastructure, and risk to human health. (2019-10-01)
Growing old together: A sharper look at black holes and their host galaxies
The 'special relationship' between supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their hosts -- something astronomers and physicists have observed for quite a while -- can now be understood as a bond that begins early in a galaxy's formation and has a say in how both the galaxy and the SMBH at its center grow over time, according to a new study from Yale University. (2019-09-30)
Does being a 'superwoman' protect African American women's health?
A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers explores whether different facets of being a strong black woman, which researchers sometimes refer to as 'superwoman schema,' ultimately protect women from the negative health impacts of racial discrimination -- or cause more harm. (2019-09-30)
Microbes in warm soils released more carbon than those in cooler soils
Simply by moving tropical soils down a mountainside into warmer environments, a team including Smithsonian scientists Andy Nottingham and Ben Turner discovered that much more CO2 may be released due to increased microbial activity as soils warm. (2019-09-30)
Taxi drivers face highest levels of black carbon compared to other professional drivers
Professional drivers working in congested cities are exposed to black carbon levels that are on average a third higher than would be experienced at a busy roadside, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. (2019-09-28)
Converting CO2 to valuable resources with the help of nanoparticles
An international research team has used nanoparticles to convert carbon dioxide into valuable raw materials. (2019-09-27)
Scientists watch a black hole shredding a star
A satellite searching space for new planets gave astronomers an unexpected glimpse at a black hole ripping a star to shreds. (2019-09-26)
Compute at the speed of light
A new way to achieve integrated photonics--a new device has been developed at the University of Delaware that could have applications in imaging, sensing and quantum information processing, such as on-chip transformation optics, mathematical operations and spectrometers. (2019-09-26)
Found: 'Poster child' for being shredded by a black hole
NASA's TESS has for the first time seen the aftermath of a star that was violently ripped apart by a supermassive black hole. (2019-09-26)
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