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Current Black hole News and Events

Current Black hole News and Events, Black hole News Articles.
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Hospitalizations among dialysis patients are higher in areas with more black residents
Patients receiving hemodialysis at facilities located in residential areas with a high percentage of Black residents have a higher rate of hospitalization. (2019-11-09)
Arctic shifts to a carbon source due to winter soil emissions
A NASA-funded study suggests winter carbon emissions in the Arctic may be adding more carbon into the atmosphere each year than is taken up by Arctic vegetation, marking a stark reversal for a region that has captured and stored carbon for tens of thousands of years. (2019-11-08)
New study suggests 'Pac-Man-like' mergers could explain massive, spinning black holes
Scientists have reported detecting gravitational waves from 10 black hole mergers to date, but they are still trying to explain the origins of those mergers. (2019-11-08)
Investigation of oceanic 'black carbon' uncovers mystery in global carbon cycle
An unexpected finding published today in Nature Communications challenges a long-held assumption about the origin of oceanic black coal, and introduces a tantalizing new mystery: If oceanic black carbon is significantly different from the black carbon found in rivers, where did it come from? (2019-11-07)
Unless warming is slowed, emperor penguins will be marching towards extinction
Emperor penguins are some of the most striking and charismatic animals on Earth, but a new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has found that a warming climate may render them extinct by the end of this century. (2019-11-07)
Millions of seabirds rely on discarded fish
Millions of scavenging seabirds survive on fish discarded by North Sea fishing vessels, new research shows. (2019-11-07)
Black, Hispanic women report more pain postpartum but receive less opioid medication
Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women were significantly more likely to report higher pain scores compared to non-Hispanic white women during the postpartum period. (2019-11-06)
Black holes sometimes behave like conventional quantum systems
A group of Skoltech researchers led by Professor Anatoly Dymarsky have studied the emergence of generalized thermal ensembles in quantum systems with additional symmetries. (2019-11-05)
Study calculates links between prescription medications and risk for suicide
A review of 922 prescription medications taken by almost 150 million people over an 11-year period shows that just 10 of these drugs were associated with an increased rate of suicide attempts. (2019-11-05)
NASA's TESS presents panorama of southern sky
The glow of the Milky Way -- our galaxy seen edgewise -- arcs across a sea of stars in a new mosaic of the southern sky produced from a year of observations by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS). (2019-11-05)
Scientists may have discovered whole new class of black holes
New research shows that astronomers' search for black holes might have been missing an entire class of black holes that they didn't know existed. (2019-10-31)
Traffic exhaust at residential address increases the risk of stroke
High levels of traffic exhaust at one's residence increases the risk of stroke even in low-pollution environments, according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and other universities in Sweden. (2019-10-30)
The secrets behind a creepy photographic technique
In the 1960s, a French artist named Jean-Pierre Sudre began experimenting with an obscure 19th-century photographic process, creating dramatic black-and-white photographs with ethereal veiling effects. (2019-10-30)
When money is scarce, biased behavior happens faster
Discrimination may happen faster than the blink of an eye, especially during periods of economic scarcity, according to a new study from Cornell University. (2019-10-29)
Children's race may play role in treatment for acute gastroenteritis in emergency departments
New research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2019 National Conference & Exhibition suggests that the treatment children receive in US emergency departments for acute gastroenteritis with dehydration, a common childhood illness, may differ based on their race. (2019-10-25)
First in-depth study of marine fungi and their cell-division cycles emerges from MBL
A first deep dive into the diversity of marine fungi and their cell division cycles has been published by a collaborative team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, revealing unusual cell cycles, cell division patterns, and polarity. (2019-10-25)
Insight-HXMT team releases new results on black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries
Scientists with the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (Insight-HXMT) team presented their new results on black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries during a press conference held Oct. (2019-10-25)
For better research results, let mice be mice
Animal models can serve as gateways for understanding many human communication disorders, but a new study from the University at Buffalo suggests that the established practice of socially isolating mice for such purposes might actually make them poor research models for humans, and a simple shift to a more realistic social environment could greatly improve the utility of the future studies. (2019-10-24)
Widely used health algorithm found to be racially biased; remedying in progress
A nationally deployed healthcare algorithm -- one of the largest commercial tools used by health insurers to inform health care decisions for millions of people each year -- shows significant racial bias in its predictions of the health risks of black patients, researchers report. (2019-10-24)
Widely used health care prediction algorithm found to be biased against blacks
A new study finds that a type of software program that determines who gets access to high-risk heath care management programs routinely lets healthier whites into the programs ahead of blacks who are less healthy. (2019-10-24)
US corn yields get boost from a global warming 'hole'
The global average temperature has increased 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit over the last 100 years. (2019-10-24)
How much cardiovascular disease among black adults is attributable to hypertension?
Estimating the proportion of cardiovascular disease (CVD) cases among black adults associated with hypertension was the focus of this observational study. (2019-10-23)
How to spot a wormhole (if they exist)
Whether wormholes exist is up for debate. But in a paper in Physical Review D, physicists describe a technique for detecting these pathways. (2019-10-23)
Biological material boosts solar cell performance
Next-generation solar cells that mimic photosynthesis with biological material may give new meaning to the term 'green technology.' Adding the protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to perovskite solar cells boosted the efficiency of the devices in a series of laboratory tests, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-10-22)
Stormy cluster weather could unleash black hole power and explain lack of cosmic cooling
'Weather' in clusters of galaxies may explain a longstanding puzzle, according to a team of researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2019-10-17)
Study finds relationship between racial discipline disparities and academic achievement gaps in US
An increase in either the discipline gap or the academic achievement gap between black and white students in the United States predicts a jump in the other, according to a new study published today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2019-10-16)
Scientists discover method to create and trap trions at room temperature
A University of Maryland-led team chemically engineered carbon nanotubes to synthesize and trap trions at room temperature. (2019-10-16)
Strong storms can generate earthquake-like seismic activity
Researchers have discovered a new geophysical phenomenon where a hurricane or other strong storm can produce vibrations in the nearby ocean floor as strong as a magnitude 3.5 earthquake. (2019-10-16)
The 7 types of sugar daddy relationships
University of Colorado Denver researcher looks inside 48 sugar daddy relationships to better understand the different types of dynamics, break down the typical stereotype(s) and better understand how these relationships work in the United States. (2019-10-15)
Going against the flow around a supermassive black hole
At the center of a galaxy called NGC 1068, a supermassive black hole hides within a thick doughnut-shaped cloud of dust and gas. (2019-10-15)
Peeping into the black box of AI to discover how collective behaviors emerge
For decades, scientists seeking to explain the emergence of complex group behaviors, such as schooling in fish, have been divided into two camps. (2019-10-15)
Study: Self-reported suicide attempts rising in black teens as other groups decline
New study in the journal Pediatrics uncovered rise in self-reported suicide attempts in black teenagers, as well as an accelerating rate in black female teenagers. (2019-10-14)
Astronomers use giant galaxy cluster as X-ray magnifying lens
Astronomers at MIT and elsewhere have used a massive cluster of galaxies as an X-ray magnifying glass to peer back in time, to nearly 9.4 billion years ago. (2019-10-14)
Breastfeeding disparities among us children by race/ethnicity
Overall rates of breastfeeding increased from 2009 to 2015 but they varied by race/ethnicity in this observational study that used national survey data for nearly 168,000 infants in the United States. (2019-10-14)
Black holes stunt growth of dwarf galaxies
Astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, have discovered that powerful winds driven by supermassive black holes in the centers of dwarf galaxies have a significant impact on the evolution of these galaxies by suppressing star formation. (2019-10-11)
Children associate white, but not black, men with 'brilliant' stereotype, new study finds
The stereotype that associates being 'brilliant' with white men more than White women is shared by children regardless of their own race, finds a team of psychology researchers. (2019-10-10)
What doesn't crack them makes them stronger
It sounds a bit strange, but some materials become stronger when subjected to stress. (2019-10-10)
Women and black Americans more likely to face severe adult obesity
A multi-national study led by experts at Cincinnati Children's shows how adult severe obesity risk rates vary by sex, race and other factors identifiable in childhood. (2019-10-09)
Black and ethnic minority people face inequality in diabetes treatment
Black and ethnic minority people are not as likely to be prescribed newer medication for Type 2 diabetes and they experience less adequate monitoring of their condition compared to their white peers, new collaborative research from the University of Surrey and Eli Lilly and Company Limited finds. (2019-10-07)
Not long ago, the center of the Milky Way exploded
A titanic, expanding beam of energy sprang from close to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way just 3.5 million years ago, sending a cone-shaped burst of radiation through both poles of the galaxy and out into deep space. (2019-10-06)
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